Author Topic: Mutschli #1  (Read 1750 times)

Offline Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,220
  • Cheeses: 201
  • Contemplating cheese
Re: Mutschli #1
« Reply #15 on: July 21, 2013, 10:04:01 AM »
In any case, it's easy and this is a great cheese! (and it's entirely enjoyable after only 2 months!)
Kudos to your success! Looks great. Don't you love it when a cheese comes together?

I've been doing Beauforts (made #8 this week) and see similar attributes. I may have to give this style a try. You've encouraged me. A cheese for that. :)

the inclusions are mechanical not propionic but it still tastes really good.
I had to go back and check...you didn't add any Propioni shermanii, correct? You were relying on any that would come from the raw milk, I assume.

-Boofer-
« Last Edit: July 21, 2013, 10:09:27 AM by Boofer »
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline Smurfmacaw

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: San Diego
  • Posts: 229
  • Cheeses: 25
  • Default personal text
Re: Mutschli #1
« Reply #16 on: July 21, 2013, 10:48:32 AM »
I was surprised at how well this one came out.  I didn't add any propionii since I didn't have any and the recipe didn't call for any.  I really enjoyed cutting the curds using the swiss style.  I'm going to use raw goat milk for the next one (I'll probably end up in 7th level of some alpine hell for doing so) but I know it's really fresh unlike what I can get at the health food grocery store.

Next time I'm going to add a little PLA to get the bacteria going and maybe a pinch of propionii just to see how it affects things.  I'm not sure how much, if any the milk has around here.

While it isn't as "in your face" as a really well aged alpine cheese, it is very good in only two months.  I had some commercial Beaufort d'alpage a couple of weeks ago which was insanely good but it was aged for at least 8 or 9 months (maybe longer, I'll have to check).

Let's see....fun make, tolerant to variations in the make, ready relatively quickly and it's good.......definitely on the make again soon list. 

We also had it on some braised tri tip sandwiches and it was a good melter too.  Highly recommended.

Offline Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,220
  • Cheeses: 201
  • Contemplating cheese
Re: Mutschli #1
« Reply #17 on: July 21, 2013, 10:51:31 AM »
Let's see....fun make, tolerant to variations in the make, ready relatively quickly and it's good.......definitely on the make again soon list. 

We also had it on some braised tri tip sandwiches and it was a good melter too.  Highly recommended.
What a salesman! :)

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.

Offline Smurfmacaw

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: San Diego
  • Posts: 229
  • Cheeses: 25
  • Default personal text
Re: Mutschli #1
« Reply #18 on: July 21, 2013, 11:16:35 AM »
Make one.....you know you want to.  You won't be sorry.  I need to try a Beaufort.

Offline Alpkäserei

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Indiana/Kanton Bern
  • Posts: 600
  • Cheeses: 62
  • Default personal text
    • https://www.facebook.com/Kaesereigrimwald
Re: Mutschli #1
« Reply #19 on: July 21, 2013, 03:50:55 PM »
Its ok, we make goat Mutschli too.

In the Alps, the goat came before the cow. So goat cheeses are well known and important.

Mutschli actually may be an example of the direct application of goat's milk recipes to cow's milk. and if this is true, it is the prototype of all of our beloved Alpine cheeses. At the very least, it is very very similar to the ancient prototype. This is even reflected in its terrribly incosequential and non-specific name. Mutschli is a word that pretty much just mean a small loaf of something. In Central Switzerland, thy have Mutchlie only it is a little round loaf of bread!
Guät git's dr schwiizer Chäser


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline John@PC

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Hartsville, SC
  • Posts: 435
  • Cheeses: 36
  • Default personal text
    • Perfect Cheese
Re: Mutschli #1
« Reply #20 on: July 23, 2013, 06:59:53 AM »
That result deserves another cheese.  Hope your mother-in-law enjoyed it!  Last week I made my first Emmental; well, it started out as an Emmental but I forgot add the PS with the cultures :P.  Threw a bit in when I realized the error (it was after cutting the curds) and will still do the warm aging bit called for but doubt if I get much if any CO2 generation.

Like you I like to finish pressing the cheese without cloths. I've been cutting the pips off but it's hard when the cheese is soft.  Like the way yours look so I'll leave them be from now on.

Offline Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,220
  • Cheeses: 201
  • Contemplating cheese
Re: Mutschli #1
« Reply #21 on: July 23, 2013, 07:38:43 AM »
Like you I like to finish pressing the cheese without cloths. I've been cutting the pips off but it's hard when the cheese is soft.  Like the way yours look so I'll leave them be from now on.
I used to trim off the nubbins but then found that they disappear, more or less, with periodic washing and rubbing of the rind.

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.

Offline Smurfmacaw

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: San Diego
  • Posts: 229
  • Cheeses: 25
  • Default personal text
Re: Mutschli #1
« Reply #22 on: July 23, 2013, 03:23:43 PM »
Actually what I'd like to find or make is a finishing mold.  Do all the presses with cheesecloth to meet draining and acidification requirements and then just prior to brining or drying, an hour in a smooth mold of the proper dimensions and presto, a nice looking cheese.  Might have to see how that will work out with some makeshift molds and see if it's doable.

I think a goat mutschlii will be the make of the day on Friday.  I think I'll use thermo C and maybe a pinch of PS.  I've got to figure out the rennet with raw milk though.  I used a third less last make than I do normally and raw goat is even faster to coagulate than raw cow.  For PH milk I use somewhere around 39 drops.  For raw cow I use 33 drops and last week I used 25 and it still coagulated in 9 minutes flat.  (all in three gallons and yes, I know a drop isn't a standardized volume but it all comes from one bottle so the drop size should be approximately the same....when this bottle runs out then I'll have to readjust.)

Anyone thing there should be any major adjustments by using goat milk (other than the rennet)?

Offline Alpkäserei

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Indiana/Kanton Bern
  • Posts: 600
  • Cheeses: 62
  • Default personal text
    • https://www.facebook.com/Kaesereigrimwald
Re: Mutschli #1
« Reply #23 on: July 23, 2013, 04:32:20 PM »
The traditional form for a Mutschli is often what is called Vätterli,
This is a solid round mold with open top and bottom.

Originally they were made of wood, depending on how high up beech, maple, or fir. Now they are usually a high density plastic.

So if you can find a solid mold with an open bottom, that's what I would use.

Form factor is whatever will give you a 4 to 6 inch thick cheese. Width is entirely up to personal preference.
Guät git's dr schwiizer Chäser

Offline Smurfmacaw

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: San Diego
  • Posts: 229
  • Cheeses: 25
  • Default personal text
Re: Mutschli #1
« Reply #24 on: July 26, 2013, 02:41:09 PM »
That does beg the question - are there any good sources of vatterli?


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline John@PC

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Hartsville, SC
  • Posts: 435
  • Cheeses: 36
  • Default personal text
    • Perfect Cheese
Re: Mutschli #1
« Reply #25 on: July 27, 2013, 06:44:03 PM »
I found this link that was pretty interesting.  It did have reference to the wooden mold:
Quote
The cheese is placed into a “Vaetterli,” a wooden cheese mold. The cheese loaves are turned upside down a few times over the course of a day
It doesn't mention the type of cheese but it does make for good reading (with equally good pictures).  Maybe one day I can become a "foodie" and travel to all corners of the world sampling cheese ^-^.

Offline Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,220
  • Cheeses: 201
  • Contemplating cheese
Re: Mutschli #1
« Reply #26 on: July 28, 2013, 01:14:55 AM »
I found this link that was pretty interesting.
What link?

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.

Offline John@PC

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Hartsville, SC
  • Posts: 435
  • Cheeses: 36
  • Default personal text
    • Perfect Cheese
Re: Mutschli #1
« Reply #27 on: August 05, 2013, 04:12:50 PM »
Here's the link Boofer.   Sorry for the oversight.