Author Topic: Milk After Pasteurizing - Have To Cool To Fridge Temp Or Just Regular Cheese Making Temperature?  (Read 716 times)

Offline jwalker

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I have available one again , another 4 gallons free milk.

I did a search but didn't find the answer , so here goes.........

If I pasteurize it , and then make cheese directly afterward , do I have to bring the temperature way down to cool it first , or can I just bring it down to the recipes starting point for adding starter , say 86 degrees , and then start the cheese making process from there ?

Was thinking of making some less aged cheese this time so wanted to be sure it was safe.

Thank , Jim.
No..........I'm not a professional CheeseMaker , but I play one on TV.


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Offline H-K-J

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I think I  read somewhere that you can do this, they used the low heat pasteurizing method cooled the milk down to the proper temp added the starters and continued on with the recipe.
can't remember were I read it, I am thinking it was 101 recipes for making cheese : everything you need to know explained simply / by Cynthia M. Martin.
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Offline Spellogue

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Sure.  If you are going straight into your make from the pasteurization process you only need to take the milk down to your target start temperature.  I do that. No need to chill to 38F only to bring it immediately back up to 86F.  A quick chill after pasteurization is intended to reduce the risk of contamination in milk that will be stored for later use. The chilling isn't intended to change the structure of the milk per se, only to slow unwanted biological processes.

Likewise, when I use raw milk straight from a milking I take the milk straight to my starting temp.  e.g. up to 90F or down to 72F.  Depending on ambient temp that day, the milk that I bring straight into the kitchen from the 'milking parlor' normally hovers somewhere around 82F.
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Offline jwalker

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Thanks guys , that's what I was hoping to hear. ;D

More cheese on the way !

Cheers , Jim.
No..........I'm not a professional CheeseMaker , but I play one on TV.

Offline curdgirl

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I don't know if this helps but I know of a very small scale commercial cheese maker (in Canada) who exclusively uses standard supermarket P/H milk. He doesn't re-pasteurise and he's making various cheeses including aged cheddar types and selling at farmers markets etc..
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