Author Topic: Frozen milk  (Read 650 times)

Offline shotski

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Frozen milk
« on: May 25, 2013, 11:23:06 PM »
I have a few gallons of milk and no time and was wondering if anyone had tried to freeze milk and then make cheese?

Thanks

John


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Offline Spellogue

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Re: Frozen milk
« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2013, 11:44:34 PM »
I've frozen sheep's milk and had excellent results when making cheese with it.  I haven't tried making cheese with goat or cow's milk that's been frozen, but I hear that those milks' structures will be compromised by freezing and will not result in a good set.  The sheep's milk looks and acts the same for me before and after it is frozen and thawed.

If your milk would otherwise be a loss you might try it and see what happens.  You'd only be out your time if it didn't work at all.
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Offline shotski

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Re: Frozen milk
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2013, 09:04:20 AM »
Thanks for the feed back Spellogue. I guess I will be going the experiment route

John

Offline jwalker

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Re: Frozen milk
« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2013, 09:29:05 AM »
We used to live way out in the bush country , we would buy milk in bulk in the nearest tow and freeze it.

I found that it starts to separate after freezing , we would have to mix it very well to make it drinkable again.

The longer it was frozen , the more it would separate , so perhaps if it's not frozen too long , it may be fine.

Let us know how it works out , I would be interested myself , I just turned down 10 gallons of fresh milk two days ago , I just don't have time to make cheese right now , and I was afraid to freeze it , but maybe next time...........?

Cheers and good luck , Jim.
No..........I'm not a professional CheeseMaker , but I play one on TV.

Offline shotski

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Re: Frozen milk
« Reply #4 on: May 26, 2013, 09:50:26 AM »
"I found that it starts to separate after freezing , we would have to mix it very well to make it drinkable again."

I have noticed the same and was thinking of mixing it 50 / 50 with fresh milk when making the cheese, and then seeing if the yield is the same.


John

P.S. I have not forgotten about the mustard yellow bean recipe, I like you have been very busy.


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Offline jwalker

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Re: Frozen milk
« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2013, 10:37:04 AM »
I have another offer of 4 gallons of fresh cows milk , I pick it up today , I have a fridge on the porch that is about 38 degrees , near freezing , I am hoping it will keep a week or ten days at that temperature.

Does anyone know how long it can be kept ?

The producers say milk will keep for 5-7 days after the "best before" date , so how long is the "best before" term ?

I was searching the net for an answer and did find this :

Unfortunately, freezing milk isn’t a great option. Freezing is not recommended because freezing destabilizes the molecular structure and the resulting product will be less desirable than the fresh product. If you do freeze your milk it will keep for about 3 Months in the freezer. When thawed, the texture and color will be altered, it will be lumpy and yellow but the product will remain safe.

Cheers , Jim.
No..........I'm not a professional CheeseMaker , but I play one on TV.

Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Frozen milk
« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2013, 04:08:04 PM »
Bacteria grow even at 38F or refrigerator temperatures. These are generally not pathogens, but spoilage bacteria. That's why milk "sours" in your frig. In the case of raw milk there will probably be natural lactic bacteria, mesos and thermos as well. So even though milk might "keep" the bacteria can create off flavors and acidity complications. This is especially true if using raw milk, so you shouldn't wait too long to make cheese. From raw milk, I wouldn't wait more than 2-3 days - TOPS.
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Offline Tiarella

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Re: Frozen milk
« Reply #7 on: May 27, 2013, 06:00:39 AM »
Bacteria grow even at 38F or refrigerator temperatures. These are generally not pathogens, but spoilage bacteria. That's why milk "sours" in your frig. In the case of raw milk there will probably be natural lactic bacteria, mesos and thermos as well. So even though milk might "keep" the bacteria can create off flavors and acidity complications. This is especially true if using raw milk, so you shouldn't wait too long to make cheese. From raw milk, I wouldn't wait more than 2-3 days - TOPS.

Hi Sailor,  I try to use my raw goat milk within 3 days but because of my schedule I've sometimes chosen to take a chance and use milk as many as 5 days old because it would all go to waste otherwise so it seemed worth a try.  So far it's made lovely tommes and Caerphilly cheeses as well as some ashes bloomies.
- Kathrin

Offline jwalker

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Re: Frozen milk
« Reply #8 on: May 27, 2013, 08:04:14 AM »
Bacteria grow even at 38F or refrigerator temperatures. These are generally not pathogens, but spoilage bacteria. That's why milk "sours" in your frig. In the case of raw milk there will probably be natural lactic bacteria, mesos and thermos as well. So even though milk might "keep" the bacteria can create off flavors and acidity complications. This is especially true if using raw milk, so you shouldn't wait too long to make cheese. From raw milk, I wouldn't wait more than 2-3 days - TOPS.

Thanks sailor , I just had 5 gals raw fresh cows milk given to me yesterday , I will just have to make time for it this week.

Quote
in the case of raw milk there will probably be natural lactic bacteria, mesos and thermos as well.

So, If I were to pasteurize it , it could be kept longer ?

Cheers , Jim.
No..........I'm not a professional CheeseMaker , but I play one on TV.

Offline Spellogue

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Re: Frozen milk
« Reply #9 on: May 27, 2013, 10:36:05 AM »
Yes, I'm my experience pasteurized milk will last longer than raw milk under refrigeration, 4-5+ days longer.  We mainly pasteurize only the milk that we are feeding back to kids and keep the milk intended for human consumption raw.  Side by side the raw milk will go "off" much quicker.  I will note that clabbered raw milk is not foul like spoiled pasteurized milk which putrefies.  We are confident feeding clabbered raw milk to some of the livestock (pigs, chickens, turkeys).  They do well on it.  It looks similar to the kefir I make.  I haven't been tempted to eat it, as much as a Polish Aunt suggested I should.

We keep our raw milk at 40F and use it within 4 days.  If I'm making a natural culture cheese I use fresh raw from an evening milking and let it sit at room temperature for up to 12 hrs.  I will then often blend the ripened milk with refrigerated raw milk.  I've heard of 24 hr ripenings, but haven't felt the need to go there being satisfied with the results I'm getting already.  I've made nice cheeses with fresh, unripened raw milk and no starter cultures too. 

I have a few gallons of goat milk in the freezer awaiting soap making that I can't seem to find the time to do.  I understand that frozen milk is more desirable than fresh for soap making.  If you try frozen milk for cheesemaking and it doesn't work you might try soap making with any remainder.
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Offline Oberhasli

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Re: Frozen milk
« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2013, 02:49:50 PM »
I make cheese quite often from frozen raw goat milk.  But, the trick is to make sure you heat the milk up to a high enough temperature to reincorporate the fat globules into milk.  I usually pasteurize my defrosted milk and then when it is cooled, proceed to make cheese from it.  I tried, years ago, to make chevre from frozen milk and it turned out badly.  Chevre recipes only call for the milk to get to about 75 degrees.  It wasn't hot enough to reblend all of the milk particles.  So, now I heat it up and cool it to use for cheese and it works fine.

Bonnie
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Offline Spellogue

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Re: Frozen milk
« Reply #11 on: May 27, 2013, 07:56:03 PM »
I tried, years ago, to make chevre from frozen milk and it turned out badly.  Chevre recipes only call for the milk to get to about 75 degrees.  It wasn't hot enough to reblend all of the milk particles.  So, now I heat it up and cool it to use for cheese and it works fine.
What types of cheeses have worked for you using frozen goat milk?  Hard, washed curd, bloomies, pasta filata's?  I suppose it couldn't hurt to try freezing some for winter makes.  We usually dry our goats off before Nov. 1st.  Come January I get antsy to make cheese again.
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Offline stratocasterdave

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Re: Frozen milk
« Reply #12 on: May 28, 2013, 08:30:53 AM »
I once had a couple gallons of frozen sheep milk.  When thawed it was completely separated.  Instead of dumping it, I strained it and put it in the press.  It knitted well and I brined and put it in my cave.

I will try my claber cheese in a year!  Who knows!

Offline Oberhasli

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Re: Frozen milk
« Reply #13 on: May 28, 2013, 09:52:09 AM »
Response to Spellogue- I have made cams, crottins, chevre and fetas from my frozen milk. 
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