Author Topic: Quartirolo - Soft Cheese Mystery  (Read 559 times)

Offline jeads

  • Young Cheese
  • **
  • Location: Paraguay, SA
  • Posts: 9
  • Cheeses: 0
  • Default personal text
Quartirolo - Soft Cheese Mystery
« on: April 30, 2013, 09:23:19 PM »
Hey everyone.  I joined a few days ago and am glad i did.  a wealth of resources here.

Just a quick intro.  I have been making "cheese" for a few years now but no real effort or volume.  Then my wife and i moved to Paraguay, South America to volunteer at an Agricultural High School.  I have a background in restaurant and management, she is a graphic designer.  Within a few days I realized that there was a serious problem in the cheese factory as all the cheese tasted the same and they were either rotten or on their way there quickly.  I looked around, saw serious cleanliness problems and brought them up for consideration. Nothing changed. That was 8 months ago and with different staff.  Now management staffing has changed and  they have reviewed my recommendations and started taking my suggestions seriously and have asked me to oversee production a month ago.  We produce 160 liters (40gal) of milk a day and make about half into cheese.  other into caramel and yogurt.  This has given me a ton of milk to play with and i have to say that we have had some early successes.  The non-sucesses quickly get eaten by the 150 students! 

We make colby, Cheddar, greek feta, and two cheeses traditional here.  one of those is the mystery.  It is called quartirolo or Cuartirolo. I cannot tag it in my head or find out how to make it.  It is very creamy, sort of like soft mozz (the dry kind, not water bath mozz) or hard brie ,but not strong at all.  almost has no distinct flavor profile.  mostly the creaminess that is distinctive. here is a description that i have found for it.

Quartirolo
background/Description: This is a soft, sweet and fast-ripening cheese that originated in Lombardy, Italy. The cheese is consumed mainly as a dessert, alone or combined with sweet jellies. It is also used as an appetizer and in pizzas and sandwiches to a lesser degree. It is classified within a group together with Taleggio and Crescenza.
The Argentina Food Code defines Quartirolo (Cuartirolo) cheese as follows: “A fresh product, fatty, made with whole or standardized milk, acidified by lactic bacteria cultures and coagulated by rennet and/or specific enzymes.”

The following characteristics are also established for Quartirolo cheese:
• Moisture: Between 45% and 55% • Mass: Uncooked, molded, pressed, salted and ripened • Paste or body: Solid, somewhat elastic, soft, slightly acid-paste,
mild flavor, pleasant; uniformly yellowish, rind slightly consistent,
whole, smooth or rough • Form: Cylindrical or square, flat • Ripening time and weight: 20 days minimum for cheese weighing
less than 2.5 kg (5.5 pounds) and 30 days minimum for cheese weighing between 2.5 kg and 5 kg (5.5 and 11 pounds)
When the fat content in dry matter reaches a minimum of 50%, the cheese can be called Cremoso (creamy). Generally the finished cheese has a square form 22 to 24 cm (8.7 to 9.5 inches) long and 6 to 7 cm (2.4 to 2.8 inches) high, weighing between 3 and 4 kg (6.6 and 8.8 pounds), and moisture is 50% to 55%.


Any ideas how to make this or where to start?

Thank so much.  I look forward to your ideas.

John


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline linuxboy

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Ukiah, CA
  • Posts: 3,986
  • Cheeses: 198
  • www.wacheese.com
    • Washington Cheese Guild
Re: Quartirolo - Soft Cheese Mystery
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2013, 10:37:25 PM »
This sounds like stracchino. Aka crescenza. Fresh, soft, mostly unripened cheese. We have a few recipes here on the forum IIRC.
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.

Offline jeads

  • Young Cheese
  • **
  • Location: Paraguay, SA
  • Posts: 9
  • Cheeses: 0
  • Default personal text
Re: Quartirolo - Soft Cheese Mystery
« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2013, 08:37:20 AM »
Thanks.

I actually had searched the forum a few times but just now noticed that the search box said "this topic"  so i was not returning any results.  But i now just found a wealth of posts and will sort through them now.

John