Author Topic: Geo candidum strain descriptions  (Read 1322 times)

Offline Tiarella

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Geo candidum strain descriptions
« on: June 26, 2013, 05:41:31 AM »
I am hoping someone(s) can either share experiences or point me in the correct direction of information that will educate me about Geo strains so that I can choose without it being a complete guess.  I have looked up Geo info and everyone seems to say about the same thing....certain ones they say are more like mold, others they say are more like yeasts but no one says what that means.  Flavor and aroma are both mentioned but not with any detail.

I'd love to know more about how the yeast versus mold types  differ and why/when I'd choose one over the other.  If there are other differences as far as impact on the cheese, ability to fend off wild bacteria/mold/yeast, or other considerations I'd love to know about those too.  Anyone? 

Thanks, Kathrin

Offline jerryg

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Re: Geo candidum strain descriptions
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2013, 12:25:47 PM »
In my very limited experience, Geo 15 (usually described as most yeast-like of the popular strains) gives me the best result when making goat cheeses without PC.
Produces a a very soft body, little rind and tangy flavor. Geo 13 & 17 are generally recommended to work in conjunction with PC.
I'm sure that others on the board can offer more technical info.

Jerry

Offline FRANCOIS

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Re: Geo candidum strain descriptions
« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2013, 05:43:56 PM »
Attached are specifications and some details on all of the geo strains that Danisco offers.  Start by having a look at these, note that not all my by available in your country.  The most common are 13, 15 and 17.

Offline meyerandray

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Re: Geo candidum strain descriptions
« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2013, 12:04:32 AM »
Thank you all for a great thread!!! :)
I wish there were a more smiley smiley face  ;)

Offline Tiarella

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Re: Geo candidum strain descriptions
« Reply #4 on: June 27, 2013, 05:48:35 AM »
Attached are specifications and some details on all of the geo strains that Danisco offers.  Start by having a look at these, note that not all my by available in your country.  The most common are 13, 15 and 17.

Thank you SO much Francois!   :). This is a great start of beginning to feel like I can know a little bit about the differences.  Someday I hope someone shares an experiment of the same cheese make and same affinage conditions but different Geo strains and then takes photos and taste notes.  I know there are so many other variables that might affect future makes but the comparison would be so educational. 

Offline Tiarella

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Re: Geo candidum strain descriptions
« Reply #5 on: June 27, 2013, 06:00:52 AM »
Celine,  I think I can feel your real smile, the one on your face, in many of your posts.  I feel your lovely joyous presence in your posts.....even your frustrated with PC posts!  :D  You feel like such good company on the forum.   ^-^

Offline meyerandray

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Re: Geo candidum strain descriptions
« Reply #6 on: June 27, 2013, 08:56:06 AM »
Thanks Kathrin!  If I can find the same distributor who can give me at least 3-4 different strains of geo, I would be more than happy to do that experiment and share my experience.  I have been pretty busy lately, so I haven't been able to dedicate much time to finding cultures and plan what I want to order etc, but as soon as I get around to it, I will publish!
I found the thread about the cheeseshop guy, it was a thread I started, "toma blue with pink accents", let me know if you post there or somewhere else?  I am very curious, and KNOW you were showered with praise, and most likely a big push to get yourself legal so he could buy your cheeses  :)
PPS I am marinating a very yummy leg of lamb and thinking about you.  Mine comes from my neighbor and is delicious, I can only imagine how good your own taste!

Offline tsago

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Re: Geo candidum strain descriptions
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2013, 02:51:37 PM »
I am hoping someone(s) can either share experiences or point me in the correct direction of information that will educate me about Geo strains so that I can choose without it being a complete guess.  I have looked up Geo info and everyone seems to say about the same thing....certain ones they say are more like mold, others they say are more like yeasts but no one says what that means.  Flavor and aroma are both mentioned but not with any detail.

I'd love to know more about how the yeast versus mold types  differ and why/when I'd choose one over the other.  If there are other differences as far as impact on the cheese, ability to fend off wild bacteria/mold/yeast, or other considerations I'd love to know about those too.  Anyone? 

Thanks, Kathrin

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Re: Geo candidum strain descriptions
« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2014, 05:56:19 PM »
Tiarella, if you've not seen her work, I'd really recommend Sr. Noella Marcellino, "The Cheese Nun," who's dissertation was on this very critter, in all its variety.  I have somewhere, I think, a wonderful paper, too, on cascading rind flora.  Anyway, just a thought, if you've not seen her yet.
- Paul

Offline Tiarella

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Re: Geo candidum strain descriptions
« Reply #9 on: January 13, 2014, 07:09:36 PM »
Tiarella, if you've not seen her work, I'd really recommend Sr. Noella Marcellino, "The Cheese Nun," who's dissertation was on this very critter, in all its variety.  I have somewhere, I think, a wonderful paper, too, on cascading rind flora.  Anyway, just a thought, if you've not seen her yet.

I would like to read her work but I haven't gotten to it yet.  What I have heard about her is inspiring.  Right now my reading time is spent delving into Mark Shephard's work in forest agriculture.  Fascinating.  Spent a day listening to him at the New England Organic Farmer's Winter Conference.  I don't have enough milk to make cheese so I'm mostly reading farming books right now. I will read the Cheese Nun book soon......as soon as I can read it without crying because I'm inspired but milkless.

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Re: Geo candidum strain descriptions
« Reply #10 on: January 13, 2014, 11:16:33 PM »
Wow, Tiarella, though I'm disheartened to read of your dearth of milk, I'm grateful for the nod towards Mark Shephard and his work...totally unknown to me.  Cheese to you, and, I hope, more milk.

The Cheese Nun video is a nice interlude, I think it was PBS(?), if you can get ahold of it. 

Good luck!  I'm just getting my feet wet again (no, seriously, no pun intended) with pasteurized, store-bought milk...but hope to start working again with fresh milk soon. 

All the best,

Paul
- Paul

Offline Tiarella

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Re: Geo candidum strain descriptions
« Reply #11 on: January 14, 2014, 12:24:29 PM »
Paul, thank you for the cheese!  I didn't even have to make cheese for that one.   ;D 

Pun intended or not, I can't resist:
The problem with getting your feet wet while making cheese is that they usually start sticking to the floor because the wetness is whey.  At least, that's my experience.   :-\

Mark Shepard  (I've corrected my spelling on his last name now) is doing some very cool stuff.  Here's a few ways to read/hear what he's doing.
a 2 plus hour video of him presenting 
Mark Shepard on Restoration Agriculture

one of his websites: http://www.forestag.com/
thumbnail description of his work in this Amazon book description:
http://www.amazon.com/Restoration-Agriculture-Mark-Shepard/dp/1601730357
his farm website: http://www.newforestfarm.net/  (interesting to see the meat he sells.  Extremely good quality of animal care and quality of feed/forage as well as lifestyle.  Good prices too.  If we didn't already raise our own meat and if we lived close enough I'd buy from him.

Check out his work.  Inspiring and elegant in it's design.