Author Topic: First Ever Bloomy Rind Cheese  (Read 2115 times)

Offline Smurfmacaw

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Re: First Ever Bloomy Rind Cheese
« Reply #15 on: July 13, 2013, 11:43:24 AM »
Thanks Sepllogue,

I'm kind of shooting for the artisan one I got at our local cheese monger. Pretty much like you described.  I'm hoping this one turns out popular with the family since it's actually quite a fun make.  I've got a reliable source for raw goat milk that I trust their hygiene so next batch will be from raw milk to see what the difference is in taste.  I am planning on putting it in the warmest part of my refridgerator on the 10th day after the make which is tomorrow.


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Offline Tiarella

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Re: First Ever Bloomy Rind Cheese
« Reply #16 on: July 13, 2013, 07:59:33 PM »
Wow, this stuff grows fast.  I guess I'll post the daily adventures of the Annette pyramids.

Tiarella, you mentioned in another thread that you were using your SAM-3 up and saving your better PC.  Why do you consider SAM -3 inferior to other strains?

cheers

Mike

Hey Mike, sorry for the delay.  My partner is away all week, I've  had two goats due to birth (only one has popped so far) and lots of fruit to pick so I'm a bit scattered.  I guess that Yoav/iratherfly feels like all the cheese suppliers started pushing it and he wasn't sure why and had the opinion that it's not that interesting of a culture.  It is anti-Mucor and he felt that wasn't a good enough reason to use it but try comparing it's description to other PC varieties such as Neige and VB (not sure if I remembered that name right).

I've used three types so far but haven't done side by side testings.

Offline Smurfmacaw

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Re: First Ever Bloomy Rind Cheese
« Reply #17 on: July 13, 2013, 08:10:37 PM »
Sounds like having goat babies is even harder and more stressful then having kids......er, wait a minute......

all humor aside, the mold is growing great.  Now i have to figure out how to age it correctly.  Tomorrow it will have a most excellent mold coverage, that I've been patting down, so should I wrap it in cheese paper or should I move the mini cave to the fridge in the big house?  I have high hopes but I'm going to make some raw goat valancey's to see how the taste compares.  I really like this style of cheese.  I've got an amazing fried nut crusted Brie/Camembert recipe that just demands I make some more cheese.

This is way too much fun.

Offline Tiarella

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Re: First Ever Bloomy Rind Cheese
« Reply #18 on: July 13, 2013, 09:37:07 PM »
I agree that making cheese is way too much fun!   :D  I think it's Bob that keeps his in his cave and never wraps them.  I usually pat them down and then wrap or at least move to a cooler place for the next stage.  I guess it depends upon how verdant your PC is.  (although "verdant" implies green but you know what I mean, right?)  If the PC is thick it's probably best to age at a cooler temp to slow down the process and avoid slipskin.  I'm off to check on the Goodyear Blimp goat.  I hope she doesn't have more than four kids this time.  If she does, I'll mail some to you and you can have your own source of raw goat milk.   >:D

Offline Spellogue

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Re: First Ever Bloomy Rind Cheese
« Reply #19 on: July 13, 2013, 11:36:34 PM »
Personally, I don't bother to wrap them until/unless I'm going to transport them or present them to someone.  I keep them in a minicave until they're ready to be eaten. I would keep an eye on them and vent for a bit lower RH than for a Camembert and move to even cooler temps if necessary to keep growth slow.  The rind will usually look to have hit a stasis at some point, but there will still be active ripening under the surface.  When possible  I find it nice to make 5-6 of these at a time so that I can eat them at about 7-10 day intervals starting at about 4-5 weeks, until I determine they've peaked. That's subjective thing, but it's also very interesting trying them at different stages.

I've only ever made them with raw milk from our goatherd.  We keep Nigerians like Tiarella does.  I'm curious to hear about your comparison of a raw make to a pasteurized one.
I can resist anything but temptation.      ~ Oscar Wilde


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Offline Smurfmacaw

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Re: First Ever Bloomy Rind Cheese
« Reply #20 on: July 14, 2013, 06:10:13 PM »
Thanks Spellogue,

you caused me to do a little more research and it seems the zeitgeist says that wrapping in paper only accelerates ammoniation if done too early.  I've got it in the fridge now in it's own box.  My daughter gets a kick out of me patting the mold down but I guess it's the little things that entertain your kids......sometimes though I think the ones with hooves might be less trouble........

Offline Spellogue

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Re: First Ever Bloomy Rind Cheese
« Reply #21 on: July 14, 2013, 09:49:49 PM »
My daughter gets a kick out of me patting the mold down but I guess it's the little things that entertain your kids...

That's it!  Start them early on fostering that love of cheese.
I can resist anything but temptation.      ~ Oscar Wilde

Offline Smurfmacaw

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Re: First Ever Bloomy Rind Cheese
« Reply #22 on: July 16, 2013, 12:28:09 PM »
Ha, they are amused at all the cheese pictures I take too.  Oh well, they are coming around to where they like different styles of cheese.  The pyramids are looking pretty good.  I'v got them on the top shelf in the refrigerator, just put a thermometer in there this morning so I will know what the temp really is when I get home.  Patting the mold down gently every day to keep it under control.  Ripening box has mild condensation so I'm estimating 90-95% rh.


Offline Tiarella

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Re: First Ever Bloomy Rind Cheese
« Reply #23 on: July 17, 2013, 02:15:31 PM »
They look great!!!!   :D

Offline Smurfmacaw

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Re: First Ever Bloomy Rind Cheese
« Reply #24 on: July 19, 2013, 10:42:38 PM »
Next question.......


My refrigerator is too cold I think......about 36-38 degrees.  Am I right about that?  My wife the nurse is a food safety nazi so raising the temp in the fridge isn't going to fly.  Will keeping it that cold totally arrest the ripening or just delay it?  Also, I've moved it back to my ripening fridges at 53 degrees.  Will that cause damage or will it just make it ripen faster and it'll be ok?  If that is the case then I'm good to go.  I may be able to rearrange the cheeses and cool one of my cheese fridges down somewhat. 


Ideas?

Mike


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Offline Tiarella

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Re: First Ever Bloomy Rind Cheese
« Reply #25 on: July 20, 2013, 05:55:20 AM »
I think you're fine with it in one of your aging caves.  I usually drop the temp a bit because I don't think it'll ruin anything else.  I figure natural caves have some natural variation even though it's buffered by earth temp.  I have also aged them in a regular fridge at normal fridge temp and they've worked out fine too.  Slows it down for less chance of slipskin.  I've done them both wrapped and in mini caves in the kitchen fridge.

Offline Smurfmacaw

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Re: First Ever Bloomy Rind Cheese
« Reply #26 on: July 23, 2013, 06:33:31 PM »
Started to get a slight ammonia smell....used my wife's nose, she is very sensitive to all aromas.  So raised the temp in the fridge in the house to 40 or so (hope she doesn't read this) and am going to age it a little slower.  How thick should I shoot for on the gooeyness under the rind?  The gooey part is my favorite but the creamy chevre in the middle is a close second.   Don't want to push the envelope on who can eat it though....I know some cheese snobs like the ammonia to the point you can clean your floor with it but I really am not a fan of strongly ammoniated cheeses.

Offline linuxboy

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Re: First Ever Bloomy Rind Cheese
« Reply #27 on: July 23, 2013, 06:38:32 PM »
Quote
I know some cheese snobs like the ammonia to the point you can clean your floor with it
Really? Everyone I know considers it a fault in all cheeses. Some slight amount is tolerable sometimes, but nobody actually likes it that I know of.
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.

Offline Smurfmacaw

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Re: First Ever Bloomy Rind Cheese
« Reply #28 on: July 23, 2013, 06:53:09 PM »
I read somewhere that real cheese snobs like them to the verge of not being able to stand the ammonia....I'll see if i can find where I read that.  I agree that it is not what I consider a good taste.

Offline Smurfmacaw

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Re: First Ever Bloomy Rind Cheese
« Reply #29 on: July 23, 2013, 07:10:36 PM »
Aha,

it was from the wiki.

"After ~4 weeks age, the smell of ammonia will become apparent while the creamy golden interior will become ever-more liquid. This is the preferred age of B/C snobs. But eventually, even the hardiest of B/C-lovers will concede defeat to an odor that is “not far removed from wet gym kit that has been allowed to fester undisturbed inside a plastic bag for more than a week”. If the cheese reaches this stage, it should be thrown out, or buried."

Personally the smell of ammonia is not desired.