Author Topic: Gouda Recipe - Metric conversion  (Read 427 times)

Offline bgreen

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Gouda Recipe - Metric conversion
« on: July 10, 2013, 02:32:41 AM »
Hi all i found what looks like a great Gouda recipe on these boards from "Likesspace."  The link is found here....  http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,2826.0.html

It talks of using 4 gallons of milk... would this be equivalent to 16 litres.  I understand there are several different measures for milk depending if it is USA or other.  Any advise would be great.   Cheers Bruce





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Offline jwalker

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Re: Gouda Recipe - Metric conversion
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2013, 07:41:15 AM »
One US gallon is 3.785 liters.

One Canadian (Imperial) Gallon is 4.546 liters.

So one would want to make sure what the original recipe was quoted in.
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Gouda Recipe - Metric conversion
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2013, 08:09:14 AM »
Hi Bruce. You would also do well to consider linuxboy's recipe. I've used it and had good results.

It calls for 3 gallons which might be translated to 11-12 liters.

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Offline Schnecken Slayer

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Re: Gouda Recipe - Metric conversion
« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2013, 11:03:47 AM »
I have used the recommendations on the cultures and they have worked fine. eg 1/4 tsp per 10 Litres.
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Offline bgreen

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Re: Gouda Recipe - Metric conversion
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2013, 07:04:40 PM »
Hi all

Thanks again for the quick replies... and the willingness to share your knowledge.  Schnecken and JWalker thanks for clarying.

Boofer thanks for your suggestion re the other recipe too... i've had a look and it looks good.. but as always a few more questions....

Firstly Linxboy talks about using milk that has the right fat content..... i was intending using raw farm milk as i have a great supply.... is this essential.... seems a shame to be watering it down with store bought low fat milk or is there some other easy way of reducing the fat content?

Secondly i dont know that i can get MM100 or similar in NZ.... i can get and have Flora Danica, do i need to use both?

The brining process he talks about... referred to his chart but couldnt quite understand it.... what percentage brine solution is recommended?

I was looking at using a 1.8kg round mould with Top Diameter: 16 cm, Bottom Diameter: 15.4 cm, Height: 15.7 cm... would this be a good choice?

Thanks for your help in clarifying these points

Regards Bruce


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Online JeffHamm

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Re: Gouda Recipe - Metric conversion
« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2013, 07:25:44 PM »
Hi Bruce,

Flora Danica should be fine; FD has Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris in addition to Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis (which make up MM100).  Strains and amounts of each may differ, but basically, you'll be good with just FD.  It's tough to get many of the cultures here in NZ as not a lot of suppliers bring them in.  CottageCrafts has a few, and I've had good service from them and delivery charges are minimal (I have no connection to them other than having bought stuff).  Still, I often use buttermilk or yogurt that I get from the store and those will do (buttermilk is usually made with similar cultures as FD, but in different proportions and different strains, so it's not identical, but it works). 

The mould should be fine for 10-11 makes.  I use a similar one for mine of that size.

To reduce your fat content, you could let the cream come to the surface, then remove some of it (say, about half).  You could use your removed cream to make butter, or a small batch of cream cheese (or just put it over strawberries or use in your coffee, etc).  Look forward to hearing how it goes.

- Jeff


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Offline bgreen

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Re: Gouda Recipe - Metric conversion
« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2013, 08:47:36 PM »
Hi Bruce,

Flora Danica should be fine; FD has Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris in addition to Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis (which make up MM100).  Strains and amounts of each may differ, but basically, you'll be good with just FD.  It's tough to get many of the cultures here in NZ as not a lot of suppliers bring them in.  CottageCrafts has a few, and I've had good service from them and delivery charges are minimal (I have no connection to them other than having bought stuff).  Still, I often use buttermilk or yogurt that I get from the store and those will do (buttermilk is usually made with similar cultures as FD, but in different proportions and different strains, so it's not identical, but it works). 

The mould should be fine for 10-11 makes.  I use a similar one for mine of that size.

To reduce your fat content, you could let the cream come to the surface, then remove some of it (say, about half).  You could use your removed cream to make butter, or a small batch of cream cheese (or just put it over strawberries or use in your coffee, etc).  Look forward to hearing how it goes.

- Jeff

Jeff thanks for that.....I get most of my supplies from cottage crafts and have found them very good to deal with.  Thats a great idea re reducing the cream.... quite simple and logical... i had actually considered that... but thought rather than look a bit too basic..... i would ask!  Will keep you updated with progress... thanks again... cheers bruce