Author Topic: Special Medical Diets: Nonfat cheese  (Read 596 times)

Offline tellner

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Special Medical Diets: Nonfat cheese
« on: July 11, 2013, 04:18:45 AM »
I have a friend who is on the Ornish diet which means no more than 10% of calories can be fat, and the only animal product he can have is nonfat milk. So far my experiments have been tentative and only partially successful. Does anyone have any suggestions for cheeses which lend themselves to being made with nonfat milk? Will lipase added to regular whole milk really break down the fats enough for these needs?


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Offline Tomer1

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Re: Special Medical Diets: Nonfat cheese
« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2013, 08:12:10 AM »
That's very unhealthy. she should stop this diet.    Proper way to lose weight is high protein, medium carbs (preferably whole grains), lots fiber from veg, min 1.5 L\day water and at least 30-40 min of aerobics 3-4 times a day. heart rate should be based on the person's fitness level, age and general health.

Lipase doesn't break up fats per say but simply transforms one type of fat (3 chain type of acid) to a different type (single chain).  calorie content will not change.

Tasty Non fat cheeses is the holygrail of commercial\industrial cheese making. 
But basically gouda, parmesan and semi lactic ripened cheeses (perhaps much more difficult to get proper texture)  and fresh lactic cheeses can be made with 0% fat milk.
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Offline linuxboy

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Re: Special Medical Diets: Nonfat cheese
« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2013, 08:49:58 AM »
Tomer, it might be for cardiovascular health reasons not weight loss. Ornish diet has decent support in literature for reducing cardiovascular disease risk.
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Offline tellner

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Re: Special Medical Diets: Nonfat cheese
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2013, 11:43:13 PM »
Tomer, it's for cardiovascular health, not weight loss. Ornish has a good record for reducing arterial plaque.

Your suggestions on cheeses to experiment with are GREATLY appreciated.

Offline Tomer1

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Re: Special Medical Diets: Nonfat cheese
« Reply #4 on: July 12, 2013, 08:47:56 AM »
Quote
Ornish diet has decent support in literature for reducing cardiovascular disease risk.

Really? I should look it up. I dont see how avoiding fat all togther can be healthy... seems like both your HDL and LDL will be low.
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Offline tellner

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Re: Special Medical Diets: Nonfat cheese
« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2013, 09:54:47 PM »
About 10% of calories ate still from fat unders this diet. Just not animal or saturated vegetable fat

Offline Geo

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Re: Special Medical Diets: Nonfat cheese
« Reply #6 on: August 11, 2013, 04:59:53 PM »
Hi Tellner,

I'm not deliberately on the Ornish diet but I have an intolerance to saturated fats so have a fat intake similar to Ornish levels. For me, eating saturated fats hurts so I quickly learn what I can and can't eat.

I'm a very new cheesemaker so can't speak to making cheese from nonfat milk, but I can tell you what works for me in terms of consumption. Most commercial cheeses are out for me, but I do find I can eat a little parmesan because of its lower fat content. I've also had success with home-made feta and halloumi made from low-fat milk - but they will, of course, increase salt intake if that's an issue.