Author Topic: Camembert  (Read 1103 times)

Offline Smurfmacaw

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Camembert
« on: July 15, 2013, 10:29:15 PM »
Had some extra time on my hands Yesterday so I made up a Camembert (two actually).

1 gallon raw cow's milk
2.5 oz Flora Danica mother culture
1/8 tsp SAM 3
1/32 tsp Geo 13
9 drops single strength calf rennet (diluted)

Heated the milk to 90 degrees and added the starter and molds.
Ripened for 75 minutes
added rennet
floc in 15 minutes - floc multiplier of 6
Cut in 3/4 inch cubes and let heal for 10 minutes.
Stirred for 20 minutes
let settle for 10 minutes
ladled into two 4.5 inch moulds
did the flipping routine
this morning i salted each cheese with 1 tsp of salt
This evening they were dry enough so I put a little ash (liked the way the valencay's look and wacheese website says it helps prevent slipskin....but mostly I like the way the valencay's look)

Into the cave they went.

Here's a pic before the ash.  I think the aspect ratio came out pretty much right on. 



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Offline Spellogue

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Re: Camembert
« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2013, 06:29:35 AM »
Yes.  Looks like your form factor is spot on for  Camembert.  I'm curious about the ash on this one.  Any picks yet?   I've never had a slipskin on an ash rinded cheese either.  All my ashes bloomies have been semi-lactic so far.  I've had a few un-ashed ones go toady on me this year.  I might try it on a renneted cheese soon.
I can resist anything but temptation.      ~ Oscar Wilde

Offline Smurfmacaw

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Re: Camembert
« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2013, 09:34:05 AM »
I'll post a pic today.  The PC is just starting to come in.  I just did the ash because I like the way it looks but if it has benefits then even better.

Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Camembert
« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2013, 09:57:02 AM »
Ash buffers the acidity and makes the environment less favorable to slip skin.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com

Online JeffHamm

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Re: Camembert
« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2013, 02:39:08 PM »
Nice looking pair of cams.  I'm curious to see how they look and turn out with the ash. 

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.


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Offline Spellogue

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Re: Camembert
« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2013, 04:42:57 PM »
Ash buffers the acidity and makes the environment less favorable to slip skin.

 I do like what ash does for the cheese.  And such a striking presentation.   Well worth the mess in working with it.. 
I can resist anything but temptation.      ~ Oscar Wilde

Offline John@PC

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Re: Camembert
« Reply #6 on: July 19, 2013, 07:45:50 PM »
I've "ashed" my last bries because it's fun (kind of like playing in a mud puddle but messier) and does seem to contribute to a good result.  Best of all it does give that signature black outline under the over-mold when you cut and serve.  Also, there's something about going from a matte black  surface to a fuzzy-white! 

Offline Smurfmacaw

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Re: Camembert- pics
« Reply #7 on: July 19, 2013, 10:36:56 PM »
Ok, the pics.  They were pretty much black but i lightened up on the ash after Yoav mentioned ash making people teeth turn black from eating the cheese.  Even so, the mold is coming in fast.  Not nearly as fast as the valencays but it is there.  I was going to put an ash layer in the goat caerphilly but it was just too chunky before the first press so I passed.  This will be the basis of a nut crusted fried camembert that we all love.


Offline Smurfmacaw

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Re: Camembert - MOre mold
« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2013, 06:49:21 PM »
Ok,

they've pretty much covered themselves with mold now.....both look the same so only one pic.  One is promised to one of the people that work with me and the other is destined to be macadamia nut crusted and fried camembert (when you have a pet Hyacinth Macaw, you have plenty of macadamia nuts....the trick is cracking them.....easy for him, not so easy for me and my hammer.)  ONce I do it I'll post a pic and the recipe.  Easy and very good.  I really like the way they are going.  Looking for any advice on how they should feel at the peak of ripeness.  I'm planning on letting them go another 7 or 8 days in the 53 degree cave and the in the fridge that I've raised the temp without the food police's knowledge.......  >:D

I have to say that I really like the bloomies both for the make and for the cool changes (eating them is icing on the cake).


Offline Spellogue

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Re: Camembert
« Reply #9 on: July 24, 2013, 12:42:41 PM »
As much as some have come up sooner, my optimum age for cams usually doesn't  start until they hit a least 5 weeks.  Two and a half or three weeks sounds too early to me.  Much depends on your conditions though.  I keep them rather cool (45-48F-ish) and so 6-8 weeks is common for me. 

The corners will ripen first.  If the cheese is still firm overall but the corners start leaking, things are going too fast.  If that were the case I'd reduce temp and RH.  The cheese will be much firmer at cave temp than at serving temp.  If you're really unsure of it's state you can bring it up to temp and see how yielding it is, but that can be dicey if done too often. 

I'm not sure about the impact the ash will have on the overall viscosity of he cheese.  My Valencays normally stay firm through maturity.  I hope others will weigh in on this note.
I can resist anything but temptation.      ~ Oscar Wilde


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Offline SueF

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Re: Camembert
« Reply #10 on: August 08, 2013, 02:06:07 AM »
been having problems getting mould on camembert, I have it in wine fridge with correct temp ,but low humidity,I have had conflicting info my first lesson was to put 3 tsp  of water in ( plastic with drain mat in) incubator seal lid ,no luck there.
Then told keep incubator dry always wipe lid if moisture appears.
 The next one said to place a damp paper towel in incubator. Can anyone tell me the right way please

Offline jerryg

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Re: Camembert
« Reply #11 on: August 08, 2013, 11:46:28 AM »
Assuming you followed an appropriate recipe... if you are ripening in a sealed plastic container, a small dish of water within should provide ample humidity.
How long has the cheese been in the cave?

Offline SueF

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Re: Camembert
« Reply #12 on: August 08, 2013, 05:47:18 PM »
yes the recipe is ok ,I follow exactly, the container holds 4 camembert, but it has been taking 3 weeks  plus to get a very light  uneven cover . I Have thrown out 3 batches over the past 6 months  as I left them in for an extended time to get more mould and they got very slimy, but I am determined to get it right. I think I have had to much moisture.

Offline Smurfmacaw

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Re: Camembert
« Reply #13 on: August 09, 2013, 06:50:31 PM »
I put mine in tupperware bowls with lids.  The cheese keeps the humidity up if the lid is on and you can control the humidity by not putting the lid all the way on.  I'm shooting for a light condensation after 8 hours in the cave.  I pat them down lovingly twice per day so they get an air exchange then so they don't suffocate and start making ammonia.

I'm trying a different way to regulate the humidity in the caves and if that works out I'll just keep one at high humidity for the ones that need it an the other cave somewhat dryer for the hard cheeses.

I lowered the temp in one of the caves because I had to go out of town for a week or so and I didn't want them sitting in the household fridge at 36 degrees.  My daughter is turning them for me daily.  They are sitting at about 44-46 degrees.

Offline SueF

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Re: Camembert
« Reply #14 on: August 09, 2013, 09:20:38 PM »
How long before you start to get mould ?