Author Topic: Mild cheese  (Read 334 times)

Online steffb503

  • Catskill Mts, NY State, USA
  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Posts: 499
  • Cheeses: 9
    • M & S Farm
Mild cheese
« on: July 31, 2013, 01:36:06 PM »
What would you say is a mildest aged cheese. Pressed, and aged?


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline Spellogue

  • Michael
  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Ohio
  • Posts: 303
  • Cheeses: 14
  • Default personal text
Re: Mild cheese
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2013, 02:58:43 PM »
Gouda, or most clean rinded washed curd cheeses come to mind as mild cheeses for me.
Beyond aging conditions and keeping lipase and mold adjuncts out of the make , I think starter selection and lactic treatment contribute a lot to the sharpness and flavor profile of a cheese.  I've made some nice mild cheeses with raw goat milk using no commercial starter.

Guessing you're looking to make and gift some cheese to someone with timid taste buds, no?
I can resist anything but temptation.      ~ Oscar Wilde

Online steffb503

  • Catskill Mts, NY State, USA
  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Posts: 499
  • Cheeses: 9
    • M & S Farm
Re: Mild cheese
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2013, 06:06:05 AM »
I have some customers telling me the cheese is too sharp for them. I love sharp cheese so I guess I am creating cheese I like but not everyone does. If I had a mild cheese I feel I could accommodate more customers.
Thanks

Offline Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,222
  • Cheeses: 201
  • Contemplating cheese
Re: Mild cheese
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2013, 09:28:57 AM »
Do you have examples of some of the cheeses you make that others say are too sharp? If you provided make details here I'm sure other opinions might help.

Along with Gouda, Tilsit and Saint Paulin have been mild but flavorful cheese styles for me. I haven't made Butterkaese but I would imagine it also fits into that category.

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.

Offline jwalker

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Creston BC Canada
  • Posts: 648
  • Cheeses: 66
  • I thought I was indecisive , now I'm not so sure!
Re: Mild cheese
« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2013, 10:31:56 AM »
What would you say is a mildest aged cheese. Pressed, and aged?

What do you consider "aged" ?

I just made and tried my first Caerphilly , it is very mild , with the texture of a more aged cheese , mine was only a month old and very good , they can be aged a lot longer though.

From a commercial standpoint , I would think it would be a good choice because of the mildness and short aging period.

So far everyone who has tried mine , really likes the mildness and the aged texture.
No..........I'm not a professional CheeseMaker , but I play one on TV.


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline WovenMeadows

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Saranac, NY
  • Posts: 162
  • Cheeses: 5
  • Default personal text
Re: Mild cheese
« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2013, 11:26:53 AM »
Any of the washed-curd types (washed early in the make process) will get you there - Gouda, Edam, Havarti, Butterkase, etc. Plus the texture is probably the closest of a "real" cheese to an American (Processed) Cheese, which could be the norm for some folks. Colby- and Jack-types, washed later in the process (after some acidification in the vat) are also mild but with more hints of cheddar-type flavor.

Its also hard to know what someone means by "sharp", as it seems to be the only way to describe cheese that some people know. For some "sharp" means full and complex flavors, for some it means the tang of acidity, and so on. It can be hard to pinpoint what someone finds disagreeable about a certain style.

Online steffb503

  • Catskill Mts, NY State, USA
  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Posts: 499
  • Cheeses: 9
    • M & S Farm
Re: Mild cheese
« Reply #6 on: August 02, 2013, 05:48:42 AM »
I guess I will try the Caerphilly again. I made some a while back and found it was not to my liking, pbobaly not enough flavor.
I will give it another try.

I normally make a Edam, Emmenthal and a Blue.


Offline Sailor Con Queso

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Kentucky
  • Posts: 2,538
  • Cheeses: 127
    • Boone Creek Creamery
Re: Mild cheese
« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2013, 12:54:24 PM »
Edam and Emmenthal are both pretty mild cheeses. If your customers are describing them as "sharp" they are probably tasting residual acidity. There are many things that can cause that, but you should take a careful look at your make procedures and aging. Caerphilly is a little tangy, especially when young, so that may not satisfy your customers.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com