Author Topic: Kaas je kaasje  (Read 246 times)

Offline Hansadutta

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Kaas je kaasje
« on: December 03, 2013, 04:24:03 PM »
The recipe for Gouda I am using comes from the book Kaas je kaasje written by Joop Rademaker. It means “cheese your little cheese”. The book is originally from 1982 but it has been updated by his brother (I believe) in 1987 according to the knowledge of these times!
It is a small book with only 1 recipe! But with this recipe it explains quite a lot about the steps in making cheese.
Normally I believe that I don’t have much to add to this forum but probably some of you are interested in an at least 30 year old recipe of a dead dutch cheese maker. His book is sold here in all cheese supplies stores but now he can live forever in the internet. That must be worth something!

Due to logistical issues I make small cheeses. This was made with 5 litres raw milk. I will give you his recipe for 9 litres.

Milk 9 litres
Add mesophylic culture 1% or buttermilk 2%
Heat milk to 29 C
Add 36 drops of rennet (2,25gr)
Leave for 30 minutes
Cut and let rest 10 minutes (Not clear how big to cut but he mentions pea size)
Remove whey. 3 litres
Add hot water to 33 C while stirring (Water should be 75-80 C)
Stir 10 min
Remove again 3 litres whey.
Add hot water again to 36 C. He warns here about not exceeding 37 C. It kills the bacteria and causes a defect in the finished cheese.
Stir 10 min
Cover and let ripen 30 min
Fill the mold. (Place the mold in the whey and fill it there)
Place the mold up side down for 10 minutes
Place cheese in a press and press for 30 minutes with half pressure. (For cheeses 500 or 1000 gram, press with 750 gram or 1500 gram weight)
Turn cheese and press with full pressure (1500 gram or 3000 gram) for 3,5 hours
Let ripen covered but without cheese cloth for 8 – 10 hours
Put cheese in brine for 6 – 12 hours.
Coat cheese after 24 hours
Keep cheese in a cool not too dry space for example your basement. Turn daily for a few weeks. Weekly later.


Each step has it’s own small chapter in the book with some how and why’s. I tried to add the important remarks.

I made it this way a few times and unfortunately did not have the patience to let it mature. Eaten after a few months it is also a beautiful cheese. Tasty, soft, young.
I don’t know if it is a Dutch habit but what we do is the following: We cut the cheese in blocks of about 2x2cm and gobble it away with some mustard. Sharp French mustard or (for an old sharper cheese) better a mustard with some honey.
BUT if you want to taste cheese it is so much better to take the cheese out of the refrigerator 20 minutes on beforehand and cut the cheese in chipmunk size blocks (Not he size of an actual chipmunk) and eat them next to a glass of wine like you would eating grapes of a vine saying AAHHH all the time MAYBE sometimes mixing it with OOHH but that is still a bit controversial. It really increases the experience!

What I was most surprised about was the pressing mentioned in the recipe. As you can see it is only very lightly pressed compared to recipes found in other books.
The pictures are of a cheese that should have become a blue gouda as described in Tim Smiths book. (Made accoring to kaas je kaasje of course) Unfortunately the holes did not remain their holiness so the blue stayed on the outside but it did make a nice tasting rind not affecting the gouda feel and taste.

Hansadutta









« Last Edit: December 03, 2013, 04:31:33 PM by Hansadutta »


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Offline Pete S

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Re: Kaas je kaasje
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2013, 05:18:22 PM »
  I made Tim's  Blue Gouda and it came out like yours but it had a mild blue taste.
It was very  good and I will make it again using this recipe.
 I press most of my cheeses lighter then most call for.   Pete
THE MORE I LEARN----THE MORE THERE IS TO LEARN---PETE

Offline hoeklijn

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Re: Kaas je kaasje
« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2013, 05:47:19 AM »
Nice cheese Hans! You always choose for a natural rind without coating?
- Herman -

Offline Hansadutta

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Re: Kaas je kaasje
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2013, 07:00:38 AM »
Hi Herman,

Thanks. When I started making cheese I used coating because I thought that the cheeses needed to be protected from the evil outside world. Now I realize that they can take care of themselves I usually do not use coating. I probabaly will use it when I want to make a cheese that needs to be aged for a long time but at the moment I make cheeses which do not require much ageing. Furthermore I like the taste and texture of the rind.

By the way; This cheese was supposed to be a blue gouda but the holes closed before the blue got in.

Offline hoeklijn

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Re: Kaas je kaasje
« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2013, 07:42:55 AM »
LOL, a silent follower of the "cheese of the month" subject on the dutch forum???
- Herman -


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