Author Topic: Hi from northwestern Nebraska. USA  (Read 193 times)

Offline Pete S

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Hi from northwestern Nebraska. USA
« on: September 17, 2013, 11:16:38 AM »
  I am Pete and this is my first post. I really enjoy this form and have spent a lot of time searching and reading.  I have been making cheese for about 3 months now. (Not counting cottage cheese and pressed cheese made with the separated milk, 40 years ago when we had milk cows and sold the cream).       
     My  question is about my Stilton? It has the taste of the Roquefort but no bluing. I added PR  only.       
It is in a container with a fog on the inside of the lid (90+RH) at55 to 60 D . It is 5 weeks old.
    The other 3 blues that I have made blued up in a week .
     I used the recipe in Tim Smith's book Making Artisan Cheese

        Pete
THE MORE I LEARN----THE MORE THERE IS TO LEARN---PETE


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Offline H-K-J

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Re: Hi from northwestern Nebraska. USA
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2013, 01:17:13 PM »
Hi Pete welcome to the forum,
I don't think anything is wrong with your Stilton, I had one that I made with a slurry from a store bought Stilton and it never really blued up
It still has the Roquefort flavor but very little in the blue department, to me anyway, the wife say's she likes it as well as my other blues and that I should just enjoy and quit bein so damn picky  :-X
Your temps and R/H are right on, I have waited up to 11 weeks to open one (that one bit back :P) the wife said it was a little strong but alas it was gone in a very short time  ^-^
Have fun and be sure to share your cheesy pix's (some people on the forum get persnickety if yuh don't ;))
"Happiness is not the absence of conflict,
But the ability to cope with it."

Offline Pete S

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Re: Hi from northwestern Nebraska. USA
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2013, 01:34:09 PM »
 Thanks for the welcome
 I made this cheese before I found this forum,so I have no pictures.
I like my blues before they get to strong. I also like them strong but do not use as much.
I also have not yet built up a large enough inventory so my cheeses get opened young. I am working to remedy that
          Pete
THE MORE I LEARN----THE MORE THERE IS TO LEARN---PETE

Offline Pete S

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Re: Hi from northwestern Nebraska. USA
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2013, 08:43:05 PM »
I found this in another post by Alpaserie


Alpkäserei
Traditional Washing -The hows, whys, whens, whats, and what not (by request)
« on: December 20, 2012, 04:38:04 PM »

The idea of a washed rind is to create a cheese surface that will not allow any mold, yeast, or pathogens to grow on its surface. By washing the outside of a cheese, we contribute to a series of chemical changes that over a period of weeks transform the rind into a protective shell that helps to preserve the inside of the wheel and protect it from harm of any sort.
You could liken the process of washing to that of putting on a coat. By adding this outer layer, we allow the cheese to stand up to a variety of conditions that it would not be able to if we left it naked.

So again, the principle here is to wrap the cheese in a protective coating.
Some people do this with a foreign substance, namely wax, or accomplish a similar thing with oil. But what we want here is to turn the cheese itself into a rind.

To do this, we rely on bacteria, namely b. linens, either natural to the environment around us or introduced from some outside source via culture powders, etc. These little bugs will consume the cheese and break down its solids to produce a sort of slimy goo. In German, this is called Schmier. We want to form this smear, and wipe it around and keep it growing. If done properly, a good smear will cover a mulitude of evil ranging from minor rind flaws to inconsistent rh.


  If  B. linens retards mold could this be why I am not getting any mold on my Stilton? I did have a light growth of  b. linens on it
 I have several b linens cheeses in their own container in my cave

     Pete
THE MORE I LEARN----THE MORE THERE IS TO LEARN---PETE

Offline Pete S

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Re: Hi from northwestern Nebraska. USA
« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2013, 06:18:17 PM »
  I hope that I have figured out how to post pictures
If this works this is my cave.
                                                 Pete
THE MORE I LEARN----THE MORE THERE IS TO LEARN---PETE


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