Author Topic: My 5th Gouda  (Read 1283 times)

Offline H-K-J

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Re: My 5th Gouda
« Reply #15 on: October 22, 2013, 10:21:01 AM »
Whey nice Jeff, it is looking good :)
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Online JeffHamm

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Re: My 5th Gouda
« Reply #16 on: October 22, 2013, 12:06:08 PM »
Thanks guys!  It's not gouda anymore, but it's looking promising.   And yes Boofer, it has taken on an interesting translucence.  The linens are responsible for that.  Oh well, I'll get a gouda right one of these times, but will have some interesting sidelines on the whey! :)

- Jeff.
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Online JeffHamm

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Re: My 5th Gouda
« Reply #17 on: November 26, 2013, 11:43:02 PM »
Hi,

Well, this is around 87 days old, so I figure that's long enough.  It is now 1020g, and measures roughly 14.7 x 5.0 cm, for a volume of 848 cm3 and density of 1.20 g/cm3.  The paste is very flexible, and the cheese has some give to it when you press in the middle of the faces.  There is a mild, but definate, linens flavour.  Not over powering, so a good one to introduce people to the taste of a washed rind cheese.  The white paste has a nice sheen to it, and almost glistens, which I've had before from similar washed rind gouda makes.  This time, however, there is no ammonia, or any off flavours.  It is a very nice, flavourful cheese, and I'm very pleased with it. This would be a very good second or third cheese on a tasting plate.   Vanessa says it's ok, but washed rinds are not her thing (she prefers aged cheddars, blues, and brie, while washed rinds are "ok" at best!) 

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline GlennK

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Re: My 5th Gouda
« Reply #18 on: November 27, 2013, 04:52:10 AM »
Is that density change expected?  What does that represent?  Moisture loss during aging?  It's a thing of beauty though!  A cheese to ya!
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Offline Boofer

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Re: My 5th Gouda
« Reply #19 on: November 27, 2013, 07:51:19 AM »
Good job, Jeff!

Only 87 days old? That rind looks way older than that...very dense at the outer markers.

Vanessa says it's ok, but washed rinds are not her thing (she prefers aged cheddars, blues, and brie, while washed rinds are "ok" at best!) 
Perhaps you just haven't hit upon the washed rind cheese that Vanessa can't turn away from. ;)

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Offline Spoons

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Re: My 5th Gouda
« Reply #20 on: November 27, 2013, 08:09:10 AM »
Nice job on the cheese, Jeff! Glad it turned out as flavorful as it did!
- Eric

Offline DrChile

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Re: My 5th Gouda
« Reply #21 on: November 27, 2013, 10:24:21 AM »
Wow.. that looks fantastic.

Trent

Online JeffHamm

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Re: My 5th Gouda
« Reply #22 on: November 27, 2013, 11:42:28 AM »
Thanks all!  I think the high density is due, in part, to the rind shrinking and compressing the cheese.  I wanted the b.linens to calm down once they were well established, and not leave the surface wet and smeary.  That required the humidity to be lower, and hence the thickish rind.  Having washed the thick coat of linens off has left the rind edible, at least on the faces, the edge is a bit thick and chewy (but edible).  Needs a good brushing first, though, as there are some wild moulds that just taste, well, mouldy.  Remove them and it's all good.

I've got a few really nice wild rinds going this year, ones that look very rustic and well aged even though the cheese is only a few months old.  I tend to just brush back mould as it develops and, unless I'm into a washing the rind routine (which is not for every cheese), I never wash away moulds with brine and/or vinegar.  The brushing works to keep the moulds from getting out of hand, though it eventually ages the rind.  At least, that's what I think might be happening.  Otherwise, I've just been lucky! ;)

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.