Author Topic: Pasteurization Temp & Time vs Curd Strength & Protein To Fat Ratio Discussion  (Read 4162 times)

Offline RenaissanceM

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I see. Very informative graph. If I were to go by the graph, at around 78 deg Celsius (assuming less than 15 seconds) there shouldn't be significant denaturing? Unless that small of a difference is enough to make a difference? I do add 0.015% to 0.02% CaCl2 and do the floc test to make sure I'm letting it set enough but still get the shattering effect. Would increasing my calf rennet powder above the manuf. specs make a difference? I use the higher end of 3 g per 100L recommended amount and the curd does floculate at a reasonable time...then again I don't have a good frame of reference as to what good firm curd should look like. :(

Sailor: I guess I will keep looking for other brands made by other producers even though here in Canada the market is pretty much controlled by three major producers (which I've tried them all). My last hope is the non-homogenized 174 F milk.

thanks for the info.


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Offline linuxboy

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Perhaps LB can give us a formula for figuring out the P/F ratio when adding NFD powder. Hint, hint. Oh no it's a segue. ::)


http://www.danlac.com/news/standardizing-milk-cheesemaking

someone already did it for me :)
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Offline bbracken677

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Bumping this thread due to it being informative as heck, not to mention fascinatingly interesting.

I dont even remember how I got to this, but dang, I am glad I did.

Online Alpkäserei

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to quote sailor
'i am using the Mennonite connection as part of my own marketing'
this feels weird to me
because I'm a mennonite.
dont you love being used as an advertising ploy?   ;D

but seriously, we dont mind. its nice for us. makes it easier to sell stuff...
Guät git's dr schwiizer Chäser

Offline Sailor Con Queso

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 :) ;) :D

Not a ploy. When customers ask me where my milk comes from, I proudly tell them it comes from a Mennonite farm - best milk in Kentucky, seriously. Everyone immediately knows that they are all natural and don't use antibiotics, steroids, or hormones. Cows are all pastured and grass fed. This Mennonite family actually laughs when people talk about being "organic". To them it's just a natural way of doing things and they don't consider "organic" as anything special. The big producers who boast about being "organic" are the ones with the disingenuous marketing ploy.

Alp - don't feel weird, feel proud.
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Online JeffHamm

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Re: Pasteurization Temp & Time vs Curd Strength & Protein To Fat Ratio Discussion
« Reply #20 on: September 21, 2013, 02:02:44 AM »
Hi,

I've been searching around to find information on protein to fat ratios for various types of cheeses when I found this thread.  Linuxboy mentions that for parm Parmesan 1.25:1 would be the target, and if I read the link he mentions above correctly, they suggest for Cheddar 0.95:1.  Do we have any other recommended targets for various cheeses?  I notice we often discus floc multiplier and pH targets and culture strains, but we seem to overlook this fairly important tidbit of information.  I've been searching the board for awhile, but I think this is the only thread I've found (but I'm not it's not the only one there is) where this is mentioned specifically in terms of numbers for specific cheeses.  I would like to bring this information together into a "suggested starting point" table if we could.

Thanks. 

- Jeff
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Offline linuxboy

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Re: Pasteurization Temp & Time vs Curd Strength & Protein To Fat Ratio Discussion
« Reply #21 on: September 21, 2013, 03:27:37 AM »
https://www.uoguelph.ca/foodscience/content/table-61-some-cheese-varieties-some-characteristics-composition-and-suggested-ratio-protei-0

here. Just a starting point, though. Has to work for the recipe. We typically use PF, casein:fat and other markers in recipe formulation to help hit identity targets for standards.
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Online JeffHamm

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Re: Pasteurization Temp & Time vs Curd Strength & Protein To Fat Ratio Discussion
« Reply #22 on: September 21, 2013, 01:36:44 PM »
Fantastic!  That's exactly what I was looking for and more!  Thanks a lot Pav.  A cheese to you.  I'll be spending some time today updateing my make book with this information.

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.