Author Topic: Anyone has experience with Lysozyme?  (Read 483 times)

Offline Danbo

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Re: Anyone has experience with Lysozyme?
« Reply #15 on: January 12, 2015, 10:45:57 AM »
I found the following on the site http://life.gaiam.com/article/vegan-vegetarian-macrobiotic-whats-difference:

Lacto-Vegetarians eat no meat or eggs but does eat dairy products. Dairy products include cows’ milk and any food you can make from cows’ milk, such as ice cream, yogurt, cheese, cottage cheese, sour cream, butter, and so on. Other animal products, such as goat cheese, are also included.

Offline Spoons

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Re: Anyone has experience with Lysozyme?
« Reply #16 on: January 12, 2015, 02:51:22 PM »
Lacto-vegetarians... oh god, they have a sub-species. LOL!

Aaah, now it all makes sense.  Reminds me of the vegetarians who eat bacon although I forget their rationale...it's not about dietary concerns in that situation.  Thanks for explaining....just glad everyone is eating something.......   ;)

Those would be called "swinus-vegetarians" according to the trendy sub-vegetarian groups. ;)

Offline Kern

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Re: Anyone has experience with Lysozyme?
« Reply #17 on: February 18, 2015, 08:21:54 PM »
Danbo, do you have a link where to buy lysozyme? I can't find any in north america.


It is available in the US from http://morewinemaking.com/view_product/15499//Lysozyme_-_150g.  Their supplier is Scott Laboratories in Petaluma, CA.  www.scottlab.com.  But, I am confused about a statement in the tech data sheet on the Scott Lab website:

"Lysozyme is a naturally occurring enzyme isolated from egg whites. It is used in wine to inhibit lactic acid bacteria. Lysozyme degrades the cell wall of gram-positive bacteria such as
Oenococcus, Pediococcus, and Lactobacillus.  Due to their protective external membranes, Lysozyme is not effective against gram-negative bacteria like Acetobacter . It also has no activity
against yeast.

Lysozyme’s effectiveness depends not only on the type of bacteria, but also the number of cells present. Unlike SO2, Lysozyme is more effective at higher pH’s when lactic acid bacteria growth is favored. "

Many of the thermophilic bacteria are Lactobacillus strains (delbruekii, helveticus, etc.).  So, how can Lysozyme kill Clostridium bacteria and not zap the thermophillic bacteria in the process?

Offline Kern

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Re: Anyone has experience with Lysozyme?
« Reply #18 on: February 18, 2015, 08:50:22 PM »
I have bought some Lysozyme powder to use in my hard and semi hard cheeses to protect them against late blooming etc.: www.lysolac.com/about.html

Does anyone in here have experience with Lysozyme


I am really confused about this product.  While websites connected with Lysolac (brand name for lysozyme) talk about it being added to milk in the vat to prevent late blowing these same websites mention that it kills lactobacillus and streptococcus thermophilus bacteria (ST, LB, LBL, LH, LBC - the thermophilic bacteria we are so fond of using).  I'm not sure how to reconcile this apparent contradiction.  :-\ 

Offline Danbo

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Re: Anyone has experience with Lysozyme?
« Reply #19 on: February 18, 2015, 11:53:47 PM »
That sounds strange... I haven't had any trouble using it...