Author Topic: beer and cheese  (Read 1378 times)

Offline hoeklijn

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beer and cheese
« on: October 20, 2013, 04:43:46 AM »
Yesterday it was time for an experiment again: I made two Gouda's, 1 kilo each, following the normal recipe, but I added 2 spoons of salt to the curd before pressing. After pressing one of them was put in a special dark beer that is traditionally made in autumn (called bock-beer) and one in so called Krieken-beer, which is a red beer flavoured with cherries. They will stay there for at least 24 hours.
And I made 2 lovely labels for them:
- Herman -

Offline jwalker

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Re: beer and cheese
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2013, 10:04:25 AM »
Right on Herman , I was wondering myself about adding salt to a Gouda instead of brining , it will be interesting to see how yours turn out.

Nice labels too by the way , they look very professional.

I made a four pound Gouda yesterday , and will be making another today.

Show us some photos of these soon.
No..........I'm not a professional CheeseMaker , but I play one on TV.

Offline hoeklijn

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Re: beer and cheese
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2013, 02:41:31 AM »
Quickly some images:
In the bock-beer

In the "Krieken-beer

"Just out of the beer

Bock weighting 1244 gram

Kriek weighting 1359 gram
- Herman -

Offline JimSteel

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Re: beer and cheese
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2013, 07:56:38 AM »
The Goudse Kriek looks amazing.  I wonder how far the cherry colour permeated into the paste.  Good luck with these!

Offline Tomer1

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Re: beer and cheese
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2013, 02:10:40 PM »
Quote
but I added 2 spoons of salt to the curd before pressing.
That could slow down acidification.

A better idea is press as usuall and make a beer-brine. if you want more beer flavor then do another beer soak with 2% so not to leach salt from the cheese.  remember to add calcium.
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Offline Pete S

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Re: beer and cheese
« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2013, 03:06:16 PM »
  I thought that part of the reason for salting was to slow down acidification      Pete
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Offline hoeklijn

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Re: beer and cheese
« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2013, 01:38:22 AM »
Quote
but I added 2 spoons of salt to the curd before pressing.
That could slow down acidification.

A better idea is press as usuall and make a beer-brine. if you want more beer flavor then do another beer soak with 2% so not to leach salt from the cheese.  remember to add calcium.

I know. Made Cabra al Vino both ways. But I like the Cabra's that are "curd salted" better than the ones that are "wine brined" , so I decided to try the same with beer.
Both are smelling delicious so far...
- Herman -

Offline Pete S

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Re: beer and cheese
« Reply #7 on: October 22, 2013, 02:20:52 AM »


I know. Made Cabra al Vino both ways. But I like the Cabra's that are "curd salted" better than the ones that are "wine brined" , so I decided to try the same with beer.
Both are smelling delicious so far...
[/quote]

  What is the difference in the cheese if you salt the curd rather than brine it later.  I have asked this in another topic that I have posted yesterday. ( in questions )   Pete
THE MORE I LEARN----THE MORE THERE IS TO LEARN---PETE

Offline Tomer1

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Re: beer and cheese
« Reply #8 on: October 22, 2013, 05:05:30 AM »
iS

I know. Made Cabra al Vino both ways. But I like the Cabra's that are "curd salted" better than the ones that are "wine brined" , so I decided to try the same with beer.
Both are smelling delicious so far...

Is it possible that the curd salted has higher pH (which can be a risk of late acidification\bloating))?   
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Online Boofer

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Re: beer and cheese
« Reply #9 on: October 22, 2013, 08:26:28 AM »
Oh, Herman...these Goudas look great!  :D

I'll be very curious to see the rind development. No, wait...they'll be cream-coated, right?

I'd also like to hear what the beer contributes to the cheese overall: flavor, texture, smell.

How long to age?

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Offline hoeklijn

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Re: beer and cheese
« Reply #10 on: October 22, 2013, 12:12:22 PM »
  What is the difference in the cheese if you salt the curd rather than brine it later.  I have asked this in another topic that I have posted yesterday. ( in questions )   Pete
I found it hard to control the balance between wine and salt. The cheese from the wine-brine was too salty and did not have so much wine in flavour and smell. Curd salted cheese was much much better, so why continue experimenting with a wine-brine... Didn't experience problems with acidity.
Had the same source for the goat milk and followed about the same recipe...
- Herman -

Offline hoeklijn

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Re: beer and cheese
« Reply #11 on: October 22, 2013, 12:15:43 PM »
Oh, Herman...these Goudas look great!  :D

I'll be very curious to see the rind development. No, wait...they'll be cream-coated, right?

I'd also like to hear what the beer contributes to the cheese overall: flavor, texture, smell.

How long to age?

-Boofer-

Duh, of course they will be cream-coated, they are Gouda's.
We only sell waxed Gouda's for a lot of money to American tourists  >:D
I think they wil age about 6 to 9 weeks....
- Herman -

Offline hoeklijn

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Re: beer and cheese
« Reply #12 on: November 04, 2013, 12:54:50 AM »
Ok, and here they are, coated and ready, with some adjusments to the labels...
- Herman -

Offline Geo

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Re: beer and cheese
« Reply #13 on: November 04, 2013, 01:45:50 AM »
The labels look just fabulous, Herman!

Online Boofer

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Re: beer and cheese
« Reply #14 on: November 04, 2013, 08:15:27 AM »
Very professional, Herman!

Perhaps that's what's missing in my cheeses...pretty labels. ;)

A cheese to you for dressing up a couple of already classy cheeses.

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Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.