Author Topic: Goat's milk Gouda  (Read 731 times)

Offline Digitalsmgital

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Goat's milk Gouda
« on: October 20, 2013, 10:37:41 PM »
Oh yeah, baby! I have room in my absurd "cave" for one more project and I have a good feeling about this one!

This forum is a veritable cavalcade of pertinent information...if I retained half of what I have read in these past few weeks then I am a true Cheesehead already. Here is today's project in a nutshell:

Ambient temps 85 F Humidity 72%
Listened to Bob Dylan, Django Reinhardt, Hot Club of Cowtown
Imbibed Corona Extra, Corzo Anejo

Milked goats Saturday 10/19

2.2 Galons US raw goats milk
1/4 t Meso II powder
1/16 t FD
1/2 t Calcium Chloride
1/2 t veal rennet

medium brine

brought milk to room temp
heated in water bath to 86 F
pitched starters waited 45 minutes
added calcium chloride in 1/4 cup distilled water
rennet in 1/4 cup distilled water

waited one hour instead of the 45 minutes in the recipe, still flying blind ph-wise but wanted to give the FD time to start its magic
clean break! cut curds to 1/2 inch very soft!
stir 5 minutes
settle 5 minutes
Ladle out 2 cups whey
add 140 F distilled water to raise temp to 92 F
wash ten minutes  let curds settle ladle out whey to expose curds then add 140 F water to raise temp to 98 F
stir 20 minutes at 98 F
let rest ten minutes for curds to knit

By now I needed a little Spock's Beard and Pink Floyd

Put the curds into my home made press and pressed under warm whey for 1/2 hour at 10 pounds
flipped and re-dressed and pressed at 15 pounds for 8 hours

It looks really good, am brining it overnight and its  air-dry tomorrow while I go to work
« Last Edit: October 22, 2013, 10:47:55 AM by Digitalsmgital »
Regards, Dave


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Offline Digitalsmgital

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Re: Goat's milk Gouda
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2013, 08:28:50 PM »
No one is biting the bait today, huh?  ;D

I have not taken any classes on cheese making, never seen a tutorial on pressing in whey, nor have I read (as I should) the Forum section on forming cheese...so when I put the tails of the cloth into the mold arbitrarily, and took it out after a half-hour, the wheel was a disaster as seen in the photo! I thought I must take a picture to document my foolishness, then I took another to blame the alcohol (I was drinking beer, not tequila)

The cheese came out of the 8 hour pressing looking passable, great, even!

I am learning as I go, from mistakes and successes. Mostly mistakes, I guess!
Regards, Dave

Offline Pete S

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Re: Goat's milk Gouda
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2013, 08:42:56 PM »
  I always learn more from my mistakes than from my successes.     Pete
THE MORE I LEARN----THE MORE THERE IS TO LEARN---PETE

Offline Digitalsmgital

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Re: Goat's milk Gouda
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2013, 10:50:32 AM »
so here is a photo of the cheese after the second press and air drying. Clearly I need to read up on how to dress and press!
Regards, Dave

Offline Digitalsmgital

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Re: Goat's milk Gouda
« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2013, 11:24:49 AM »
Cut this one open today after 66 days in the cave, couldn't wait plus buddies are hearing of my renewed cheesey reputation.  ;D

Only my second cheese, I was concerned that it would be too dry after trying to expel more whey out of the curd during the wash. The recipe says add 140 F water to wash the curds and raise the temp to 98, I went to 101 F. It was certainly drier than my first washed-rind attempt, and drier than a typical young gouda but within the limits of the style. Just have to imagine it is aged six months.

The goat's milk really makes this young gouda flavorful. I love it, and the wife does too.
Regards, Dave


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Offline scasnerkay

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Re: Goat's milk Gouda
« Reply #5 on: December 24, 2013, 11:44:39 AM »
Congratulations on an enjoyable gouda! How fantastic that you were able to milk goats and make cheese the next day. There is my fantasy...
Susan

Offline Schnecken Slayer

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Re: Goat's milk Gouda
« Reply #6 on: December 24, 2013, 12:10:40 PM »
That looks really good although you didn't mention what you were listening to when you tried it.   O0
-Bill
One day I will add something here...

Offline Digitalsmgital

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Re: Goat's milk Gouda
« Reply #7 on: December 24, 2013, 01:37:20 PM »
Congratulations on an enjoyable gouda! How fantastic that you were able to milk goats and make cheese the next day. There is my fantasy...

I know now how lucky I was...my buddies small herd is dry now and I am using P&H in the interim.  :(

That looks really good although you didn't mention what you were listening to when you tried it.   O0

LOL it seemed pertinent at the time, the tequila speaking I guess!
Regards, Dave

Offline Geo

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Re: Goat's milk Gouda
« Reply #8 on: December 25, 2013, 03:20:58 PM »
Lucky man, to have had the chance to milk goats and use the milk for cheese. And you know that chance will come again!

The cheese does look fabulous, and I'm sure you learned a lot making it.

Offline sarak

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Re: Goat's milk Gouda
« Reply #9 on: January 03, 2014, 09:04:12 AM »
I can't wait to make goat milk gouda!  I have a Nigerian dwarf momma who gives me almost 2 quarts a day.  I always wait until after her morning milking, then use that milk to complete the volume for whatever cheese I am planning.  I am not good at documenting the process, but I am trying to do it in a more standardized format.  I think I will add music and what ever I may be imbibing to the form.  :)  Better yet - what about naming each cheese based on these variables?  Like "Mumford-Stout-Havarti"?  Actually, that reminds me, I had an AMAZING goat milk gouda that used imperial stout somehow... mmmmm....


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Offline Digitalsmgital

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Re: Goat's milk Gouda
« Reply #10 on: January 03, 2014, 09:53:05 PM »
I think I will add music and what ever I may be imbibing to the form.  :)  Better yet - what about naming each cheese based on these variables?  Like "Mumford-Stout-Havarti"? 


I like it!

So mine would be Spock's Goat Corzo Gouda Añejo!  ;D
Regards, Dave

Offline botanist

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Re: Goat's milk Gouda
« Reply #11 on: February 10, 2014, 04:07:22 PM »
Hi there fellow goat person!  You can see by my atavar what breed I have at www.caloakgoats.com

Gouda, Goat’s milk   adapted from cow milk version in Karlin's 'Artisan Cheese Making at Home'

My goat's milk Gouda (made many times, sometimes smoked or 'blued') is adapted from Karlin's 'Artisan Cheese Making at Home'.  I've eaten these anywhere from 2-16 months aged, sometimes vacuum-packed or waxed, all good.  Depending on how high the butterfat and protein content (stage of lactation), the yield can vary but is usually the yield is about 4.5-5# milk to 1# cheese.  I usually go for 3-4 gallons of milk (8#/gallon) for a batch (or up to 6 gallons) and like to press in large to extra large tomme molds using the pneumatic press my husband built me. 

For 3.75-4 gallons of milk:

1/4 teaspoon MM100 added to milk at 84F in waterbath, allow to hydrate on milk surface for ~2 min and then stir in gently with up and down motion, 20 strokes with cheese ladle.

Ripen 45 min at 84F

Add 3/4-1 teaspoon (higher amount with low solids milk, lower amount with high solids milk) CaCl2 in 1/4 cup water (I pasteurize my milk) and stir in as above.
Add 3/4-1 teaspoon (higher amount with low solids milk, lower amount with high solids milk) animal rennet in 1/4 cup water and stir in as above.
   
Clean break in about 45 minutes with high solids milk, can take up to 75 minutes with low solids milk.  Be sure you have firm curd.  Cut into 1” curds in 2 directions and let rest 5 minutes.  Cut again in all directions into ½” curds and let rest 5 minutes.  Stir slowly and gently 15 minutes while bringing curd to 86F. Rest 5 minutes and during that time heat ~1 gallon water to 130 F.  Ladle off about 1/3 of the whey and replace with hot water gradually, bringing the curd temperature up to 92 F while stirring slowly and gently over a 15 min. period.  Let settle, then remove whey down to the level of the curd.  Add 110 F water to bring the curd temperature up to 95-96 F and stir 20-30 min. at that temperature, with longer stirring time for desired drier, longer-aging cheese.  Let settle 10 minutes to knit together at the bottom of the pot.

Prepare a pot or deep pan to accommodate mold(s) so that 1-2” of whey can cover the molds for initial period of forming cheese.  Place damp Plyban-lined (or fine cheesecloth) mold(s) into pot/pan.  Scoop enough whey out from curd to half-fill the molds+pan, leaving the rest of the hot whey with the curd.  By hand, break curd mass into 1" chunks, distributing in mold and moderately pressing by hand to fill in gaps.  Fold tails over and smooth, covering with follower.  Add 6-8# weight to follower (gallon jug of water weighs 8#), or ~5-6# weight per 1# final cheese weight.  Allow to press lightly under whey for 15 min.  Remove mold(s) from whey and press as follows, depending on size of 'make':

8" tomme mold -- press at 10# for 30 min, unwrap, flip, rewrap and press at 15# for 6-8 hr

Extra large tomme mold (4-7 gallons milk) -- press at 10# for 30 min, turn and redress.  Press 15# for 30 min, turn and redress, then press at 25# for 30 min, turn and then 25# for 8 hours for largest volume (6-7 gallons milk) for moist, short-aged Gouda, or up to 50# for 8 hours for drier, long-aged Gouda. 

Actually, I usually remove the Plyban before the long press and leave it off as I'd rather get the little blips all over the cheese that can later be rubbed off than have Plyban folds in the cheese surface.

Brine in 18% salt brine for ~3-4 hours/lb cheese, flipping once during brining, at 50-55 F.  Air-dry at room temp (but not above 72F) on sterilized rack in loosely covered plastic container until dry to the touch (2-7 days, flipping a couple of times per day and removing any moisture from container).  Ripen at 50-55 F, 85% RH (relative humidity) for 1 week, turning daily, then wax coat (or vacuum seal) and age at 55-64 F and 80-85% RH for at least 2 months, turning weekly.  If any moisture shows in the vacuum-sealed package, open, air dry at 55 F 1 day and reseal.  Some very small internal holes (eyes) may develop during aging (these are different from curd ‘pockets’ where curd was not well-knitted).  Eyes are more likely to develop at higher temperatures.  The cheese will be ripe in 60 days to 6 months for moist cheese, or 1-4 years for drier cheese. 

Do not air-dry near any other fermented foods (bread dough, beer) as yeasts will be picked up from the air and may later grow on the rind as a contaminant.

The main changes from cow milk recipes is slightly lower CaCl2 and rennet amount and ~2 degrees F lower final temperature during 'make'.  Also goat milk curd tends to be softer so requires very gentle handling.

Cheers!
before goats, store bought milk = chevre & feta, with goats, infinite possibilities, goatie love, lotta work cleaning out the barn!