Author Topic: Non-homogenized milk trouble  (Read 538 times)

Offline scasnerkay

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Non-homogenized milk trouble
« on: October 27, 2013, 11:26:30 PM »
I made a caerphilly type today, and I tried a few different ideas with this make, trying to integrate some of what I thought I heard with the recent class with Gianaclis Caldwell....
I started with the usual pasteurized, not homogenized milk. As usual, it had very thick/solid fat plugs at the top of the container, into which I had to poke holes in order to get the milk to pour out.
One of the points made in the class was that previously chilled milk, which is then heated to 122 F and held there for 5 mins, has better coagulation during the make. So, I figured that would help re-integrate the fat back into the milk as well.
However, the process of heating the milk, and then cooling it back down to the correct make temp (88 F) easily added 2 hours to the process.  And, it did melt the fat, but that seemed a bigger problem as I had this oil slick on top of the milk! Previously I just removed the lumps of fat that did not want to play nice.
As far as coagulation went, I did not notice an appreciable difference in the curd from the usual, and yield seemed the same.
I had noticed that the fat softened up and seemed to meld back in at around 95 F. So, on the next make with this kind of milk I think I will hold the containers in warm water in the sink while prepping my equipment, and see if that helps soften. I don't think I will try heating to 122F as that just added way too much time for not much change.
Susan


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Offline Boofer

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Re: Non-homogenized milk trouble
« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2013, 08:59:49 AM »
I started with the usual pasteurized, not homogenized milk. As usual, it had very thick/solid fat plugs at the top of the container, into which I had to poke holes in order to get the milk to pour out.
I've seen that with milk that is less fresh. As the milk sits in the dairy case, the viscous but fluid cream hardens at the top of the bottle. I have found that I can get the milk to assimilate (resistance proves futile) the cream if I vigorously shake the bottle and dislodge the impacted cream. Fresher milk will have more fluid cream and not present the plug problem. My store has creamline milk delivered on a certain day and that's the day I target to pick up my cheesemaking milk. Also, I always ensure that the milk I select has been rotated and has the longest pull-date.

I've had the oil slick and, if they are there, I too will skim the mini icebergs of cream on the milk surface. Sometimes the resulting grease slick (somehow reminds me of Jefferson Starship...) will result in a cheese that has a morge-repellent rind. That dissipates after a few washings though.

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Offline Spoons

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Re: Non-homogenized milk trouble
« Reply #2 on: October 28, 2013, 01:33:38 PM »
Knowing when the milk comes in helps. If I know I`ll make cheese on a given weekend, I call the natural food store where I buy the milk and place an order (instead of just buying what`s on the shelf). I know they receive the milk on thursdays, so I know it`s only about 2 days old by the time I use it to make cheese. Its a bit of added trouble, but I haven't had a plug problem since. Maybe I`ve been lucky so far, but that seems to have solved the plug problem.
- Eric

Offline pfarms

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Re: Non-homogenized milk trouble
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2013, 12:40:07 PM »
I am still new at making cheese, however, this is an issue that I have dealt with for about two years now.  The best way to get non homogenized, pasteurized milk to reintegrate is heat only to about 96F.  If you want the easiest way, just put in jars as you say in a water bath at about 106F.  Once around 96F just swirl or shack gently.  They will meld back together pretty easily.  Oh, and that hardened cream in the top of the milk, I usually (if it is around that long) take that and put it in a jar and freeze it.  Once I have a full jar I make butter with that.  It gives an extremely great yield.  I noticed that it takes approximately three days for that hardened cream to form on the top of the milk.  At least from my cows.  The oil slick I see on my milk anytime I heat it over about 105F.  I have yet to make cheese with homogenized milk. 

Offline Spoons

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Re: Non-homogenized milk trouble
« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2013, 01:40:58 PM »
I noticed that I only get fat plugs on whole milk. When I buy 35% non-homogenized heavy cream, I get a few lumps, but never a stubborn plug.
- Eric


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Offline pfarms

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Re: Non-homogenized milk trouble
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2013, 02:43:16 PM »
I have noticed that too.  I have a theory, but nothing more then that.  When I separate my milk to get cream I use a cream separator.  I noticed that I always have the heaviest thickest parts left in the plates.  I scrap that and put it in my jars too.  But I also noticed it seems to break it up a bit too from the force of the separator.  Granted, here there is no place to purchase non homogenized milk, so it is only my own milk I can attest to.  So, maybe it is something in the processing of the cream.