Author Topic: Dry salting  (Read 494 times)

Offline tal_d1

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Dry salting
« on: November 12, 2013, 05:08:29 AM »
At the last year and a half i made cheese many time most of
them are Gouda and Gruyere and Parmesan. The common to those cheese i made
is the lack of salinity, not even a little. I tried 20% and 23% brine,
12 hours or 24 hours in brine (for 1.6 kg of cheese), i adjust the
acidity of the brine but my cheese always turn out with
no salinity.
So i thought to try dry salting the curds just before the pressing (like cheddar)
but i do not know how this will influence the process and
the acidity development.


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Re: Dry salting
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2013, 09:28:36 AM »
I would try everything else first before dry salting the curd

Make your brine fully saturated, just dissolve salt until no more will go in.

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Offline jwalker

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Re: Dry salting
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2013, 09:40:19 AM »
To ensure your brine is fully saturated , make sure there is an inch or so of undissolved salt in the bottom at all times , also add some Calcium Chloride and a little vinegar (I find it helps tighten up the rind nicely).

I usually brine a 4 pound cheese overnight , 12 hours or more.

Salting the curds before molding may change the major characteristics of the cheese.
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Offline tal_d1

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Re: Dry salting
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2013, 10:16:00 AM »
I tried fully saturated and i add Calcium Chloride and a vinegar.
I never tried 17% or 18%  brine and i red that less salt
increase salt uptake.

Offline Pete S

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Re: Dry salting
« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2013, 03:10:56 PM »
Quote


Salting the curds before molding may change the major characteristics of the cheese.

  Cheddar and almost all blue's are curd salted so I think it will not ruin the cheese.
I think that it would change the characteristics of the cheese( but how)?
  I asked that in a thread I started. I got a lot of great information on what salting at different stages does but no answers as to how it would affect the cheese.
  I have salted the curds on the last 8 or 9 cheeses that I have made and cannot tell any differences as of yet.

  brineing is a problem for me. I have no room to store the brine and no good way to dispose of it. Pete
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Offline jwalker

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Re: Dry salting
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2013, 05:26:56 PM »


  brineing is a problem for me. I have no room to store the brine and no good way to dispose of it. Pete

You don't dispose of the brine , you re-use it , and look after it.
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Offline Pete S

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Re: Dry salting
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2013, 05:40:33 PM »
  I thought you had to keep it in the refrigerator.  Or can you just keep it at room temp. Pete
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Re: Dry salting
« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2013, 08:10:36 PM »
Storage temp: Refrigerated
Brining temp: Slightly higher than cave temp 13-15C... Or so I've read.
- Eric

Offline Pete S

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Re: Dry salting
« Reply #8 on: November 12, 2013, 08:45:03 PM »
  That is what I thought.  My refrigerator space is limited. some times I have to keep milk in coolers with freezer packs for a day or so till I can make cheese.  Pete
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Offline tal_d1

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Re: Dry salting
« Reply #9 on: November 13, 2013, 02:04:48 AM »
Quote
I have salted the curds on the last 8 or 9 cheeses that I have made and cannot tell any differences as of yet.

Hi Pete, can you give some Details about the cheeses you made that way ? what kind
of cheeses and how they turned out ?
Thanks.


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Offline jwalker

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Re: Dry salting
« Reply #10 on: November 13, 2013, 05:40:33 AM »
  That is what I thought.  My refrigerator space is limited. some times I have to keep milk in coolers with freezer packs for a day or so till I can make cheese.  Pete

Actually refrigeration is just a personal preference , some cheese makers have large amounts of brine , too much to keep in a refrigerated area.

They strain/filter and occasionally boil it if needed , if it's fully saturated , it's usually not a problem , I've been keeping mine saturated and in a cool space and straining/boiling ocasionally with no problem , in fact I like the aspect a good brine adds to the cheese.

This is fron RC's website: "I keep my brine here for a year or two. If it gets moldy or starts looking somewhat bad, I simply bring it to a boil and refilter it.
Dumping this heavy load of salt down the drain is hard on the water treatment system. I feel that a good brine gets better with time. In Italy and France, I see the recirculation and filtering of brine almost everywhere. When asked, some cheese makers say they can not remember changing the brine.

Most people keep the brine tanks covered and filter it when it looks dirty or cloudy. Others use a system of constant recirculation through filters. I filter mine with cotton balls back into gallon jugs between my small cheese making batches. I do check the brine pH and saturation regularly. The calcium level is not an issue after the first batch or so since some calcium will always be coming out of fresh cheese until an equilibrium is reached between curd and brine. Remember to keep the brine cool because at warmer temperatures some molds will grow (halophillic .. salt tolerant). Also, if the brine saturation drops below 16%, there are many molds that can grow in this. Remember, if you see this happen, just boil and filter the brine and correct the situation.
I tend to use funnels."
« Last Edit: November 13, 2013, 05:45:50 AM by jwalker »
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Offline Pete S

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Re: Dry salting
« Reply #11 on: November 13, 2013, 09:02:06 AM »
Quote


Hi Pete, can you give some Details about the cheeses you made that way ? what kind
of cheeses and how they turned out ?
Thanks.


  Of the last 9 cheeses I have maid 3 would have normally have been curd salted (2 blues & a cheddar)
the others (2 Jacks 2 Caerphilly  a Gouda & a Hard Alpine).
  I have opened a Jack & Caerphilly ,both were normal for there age,( we eat them young ).
 The alpine is being wash along beside another 2 weeks older that was put in brine. They seem to be developing the same.
 The Gouda has been coated & is in the cave,along with the other Jack &Caerphilly.
  I have not noticed any thing different with them yet, we will see.  Pete
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