Author Topic: Laughing Cow?  (Read 459 times)

Offline Papaclaude

  • Young Cheese
  • **
  • Location: Ottawa, Canada
  • Posts: 12
  • Cheeses: 3
  • Default personal text
Laughing Cow?
« on: November 18, 2013, 09:58:00 AM »
My granddaughters love "Laughing Cow" cheese. I'm looking for a recipe for something of similar texture and mild taste. Can anyone help me?


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Online Spoons

  • Sailing The Seas of Cheese
  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Ottawa, ON, Canada
  • Posts: 627
  • Cheeses: 47
  • Default personal text
Re: Laughing Cow?
« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2013, 12:13:08 PM »
La Vache Qui Rit is a mixture of Creme cheese and Gruyere. So basically two, maybe even 3 cheeses blended together, but aged separately. I don't know what the blending process is for such a mixture.

- Eric

Offline Papaclaude

  • Young Cheese
  • **
  • Location: Ottawa, Canada
  • Posts: 12
  • Cheeses: 3
  • Default personal text
Re: Laughing Cow?
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2013, 01:48:26 PM »
Thanx. We'll give that a try and experiment with mixtures. I'll report back.

Offline FRANCOIS

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Posts: 788
  • Cheeses: 71
  • Default personal text
Re: Laughing Cow?
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2013, 06:29:36 PM »
Laughing cow is a processed cheese.

Offline jwalker

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Creston BC Canada
  • Posts: 646
  • Cheeses: 66
  • I thought I was indecisive , now I'm not so sure!
Re: Laughing Cow?
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2013, 10:34:37 PM »
Processed cheese is made from natural cheeses that may vary in degree of sharpness of flavor. Natural cheeses are shredded and heated to a molten mass. The molten mass of protein, water and oil is emulsified during heating with suitable emulsifying salts to produce a stable oil-in-water emulsion. Depending on the desired end use, the melted mixture is then reformed and packaged into blocks, or as slices, or into tubs or jars.

Sodium citrate, phosphates, and tartrate,  are used in the manufacture of processed cheese.
So you may need some of this:    http://www.amazon.com/WillPowder-Sodium-Citrate-16-Ounce-Jar/dp/B00250Y9Y6
 
I have also read that cheese can be canned very well , and will continue to age in the jar , I hope to try some soon and see for myself , as we regularly do some pressure canning.
That would also be considered "processed".
No..........I'm not a professional CheeseMaker , but I play one on TV.


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,196
  • Cheeses: 195
  • Contemplating cheese
Re: Laughing Cow?
« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2013, 09:06:57 AM »
As an alternative, I would suggest giving Saint Paulin/Port Salut a try. With a few tweaks, you could approach the texture and creaminess of the processed Laughing Cow. It's a pretty easy cheese to make.

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.

Online Spoons

  • Sailing The Seas of Cheese
  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Ottawa, ON, Canada
  • Posts: 627
  • Cheeses: 47
  • Default personal text
Re: Laughing Cow?
« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2013, 10:29:17 AM »
Saint-Paulin is my favorite cheese to eat. I live in a small condo, the smell of it is often overwhelming. I envy you Boof! I wish I could make some Saint-Paulin, or even keep some in the fridge.

I do agree though, Saint-Paulin has the right texture (even better IMO). The taste is quite different from the Laughing Cow though... maybe add a sharp lipase to a Saint-Paulin?
- Eric

Offline Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,196
  • Cheeses: 195
  • Contemplating cheese
Re: Laughing Cow?
« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2013, 08:08:00 AM »
Saint-Paulin is my favorite cheese to eat. I live in a small condo, the smell of it is often overwhelming. I envy you Boof! I wish I could make some Saint-Paulin, or even keep some in the fridge.

I do agree though, Saint-Paulin has the right texture (even better IMO). The taste is quite different from the Laughing Cow though... maybe add a sharp lipase to a Saint-Paulin?
Really? Overwhelming smell? Nah!

There's no lipase in the cheese. It's a mild cheese. I wonder if the Saint-Paulin you ate had some age on it. The aging guideline I have is 4-5 weeks.

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.

Online Spoons

  • Sailing The Seas of Cheese
  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Ottawa, ON, Canada
  • Posts: 627
  • Cheeses: 47
  • Default personal text
Re: Laughing Cow?
« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2013, 08:51:02 AM »
I know Saint-Paulin doesn't have lipase. Just blurting out an idea to replicate the Laughing Cow tangy taste yet keep the smooth creamy texture of a Saint-Paulin.
- Eric