Author Topic: My first successful Parmesan.  (Read 576 times)

Offline svetlen

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My first successful Parmesan.
« on: December 20, 2013, 03:14:08 AM »
For Parmesan used 21 liter of milk cows. Of them 14 liters taken cream. Pasteurized at 62С  30 minutes, lipase acute 0.25 Gy. Matured 5 months in vacuum packing, weight 1800 grams. In the package of cheese looks seats covered as a powder or crystals of white color. Quite hard, but is cut well, taste lipase gave a wonderful cheese. spicy. The only negative, small crystals of calcium slightly похрустывают on the teeth. Despite this familiar immediately sold out almost all the cheese, left me a little piece of less than 200 grams. Why are these crystals are formed, 5 months is not a long term for their education. Recently ate гауду goat milk, 4 months crystals were large 1-2 mm them visible and much eating.


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Offline GlennK

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Re: My first successful Parmesan.
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2013, 04:49:36 AM »
I don't know why your cheese was forming crystals, but a cheese to your for your efforts.  Interesting that your parmesan has "eyes" like a swiss.
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Offline jwalker

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Re: My first successful Parmesan.
« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2013, 09:11:11 AM »
Gouda is known for forming crystals when it has been aged for a long time , so I guess it can happen with any cheese.

I have never seen eyes like that in a Parmesan , but it looks like a successful delicious cheese.

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Offline svetlen

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Re: My first successful Parmesan.
« Reply #3 on: December 20, 2013, 02:04:20 PM »
    
Incorrect eyes :o, honestly, I've never tried and never seen a real Parmesan, it is very expensive here in Ukraine  :-[.

Online Spoons

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Re: My first successful Parmesan.
« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2013, 01:16:13 AM »
Crystal are very pleasant in 2-year old gouda such as Beemster X-O. There`s also crystals in 5+ year old cheddar. I`ve never seen them visible to the naked eye though and on such young cheese.
- Eric


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Offline svetlen

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Re: My first successful Parmesan.
« Reply #5 on: December 23, 2013, 01:33:47 PM »
    
This early crystal formation 4 months Gouda and 5 months Parmesan me and worried. At us it is rather cheese disadvantage than an indicator of quality. In stores selling cheese accelerated maturation of 1-2 months. The main mass of people are not familiar Mature cheeses. They ask, what is the Parmesan crunches on the teeth, as the sand ? I prefer that cheese was not calcium crystals to not answer foolish questions.

Offline jwalker

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Re: My first successful Parmesan.
« Reply #6 on: December 24, 2013, 09:05:00 AM »
The crystals are nothing to worry about , apparently they can be common on some young cheeses.

I looked at Wikipedia and they had this to say :

Calcium lactate is a black or white crystalline salt made by the action of lactic acid on calcium carbonate. It is used in foods (as an ingredient in baking powder) and given medicinally. Its E number is E327. It is created by the reaction of lactic acid with calcium carbonate or calcium hydroxide.
Cheese crystals usually consist of calcium lactate, especially those found on the outside, on younger cheese, and on Cheddar cheese. [1][2]
In medicine, calcium lactate is most commonly used as an antacid and also to treat calcium deficiencies. Calcium lactate can be absorbed at various pHs and does not need to be taken with food for absorption for these reasons.
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