Author Topic: Naturally-occurring minerals in salt  (Read 287 times)

Online Digitalsmgital

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Naturally-occurring minerals in salt
« on: January 08, 2014, 09:11:24 AM »
I got this Himalayan salt for Christmas (for cooking) but of course my first thought is cheese! It has a distinct pink color to it, according to the label it has no additives.

Will it be good for my Himalayan Havarti?
Regards, Dave

Offline jwalker

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Re: Naturally-occurring minerals in salt
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2014, 09:57:41 AM »
The chemical composition of Himalayan salt includes 95–96% sodium chloride, contaminated with 2–3% polyhalite and small amounts of ten other minerals. The pink color is due to iron oxide.


That's all I got. ???

« Last Edit: January 08, 2014, 10:36:29 AM by jwalker »
No..........I'm not a professional CheeseMaker , but I play one on TV.

Offline Geo

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Re: Naturally-occurring minerals in salt
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2014, 03:03:44 PM »
Taste it on other food first. I find Himalayan salt has a disctinctive, slightly bitter flavour, which it will no doubt impart to your cheese. Fine if that's what you're after but not if it's unintended and you don't like the taste.