Author Topic: G. Caldwell's Recipes  (Read 598 times)

Offline andreark

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G. Caldwell's Recipes
« on: February 17, 2014, 05:51:36 PM »
Has anyone on this board tried any of Caldwell's makes?  I am particularly interested in what she has to say about  Lactic-Set types.

andreark


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Offline linuxboy

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Re: G. Caldwell's Recipes
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2014, 10:42:09 AM »
Gianaclis generally does a solid job in her writing. What do you want to know?
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Online ArnaudForestier

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Re: G. Caldwell's Recipes
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2014, 10:49:06 AM »
My own humble experience is that her recipe and thoughts result in some great cheesemaking.  She's an excellent writer, and a generous soul. I have and really enjoy both The Farmstead Creamery Advisor and Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking (the latter, I believe, drawing from many august personages of this very forum...).
- Paul

Offline jwalker

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Re: G. Caldwell's Recipes
« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2014, 01:13:54 PM »
I've been using her book almost exclusively lately , and have very good results.
No..........I'm not a professional CheeseMaker , but I play one on TV.

Offline andreark

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Re: G. Caldwell's Recipes
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2014, 02:13:58 PM »
LB,

I want to know how to do an Epoisses.  I have done quite a few and not one has worked well.  I read what she has to say about Lactic
types and washed rinds,  and I believe that her book has given me the reason(s) for the problems that I've had.

I am very impressed with the wealth of info in the book.  I just wanted to know if ya'll have used her recipes and been pleased.

Thanks,

andreark


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Offline graysalchemy

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Re: G. Caldwell's Recipes
« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2014, 02:28:12 PM »
I just got a copy of it this weekend and already made a couple of stiltons out of it today. Though I really need to read it from the start, seems like a wealth of in depth knowledge and written so well.  :)

Offline John@PC

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Re: G. Caldwell's Recipes
« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2014, 07:51:49 PM »
Ditto all those accolades for Gianiclis's last book.   For me it was a great stepping stone from my first book, Mary Karlin's "Artisan Cheesemaking at Home".  That said the best, most useful and obviously most entertaining treasure trove of learning is this wonderful forum  ^-^.  I was late coming here and regret it because I've learned so much and would advise anyone else interested in starting off on the right foot to "milk" the experience of the expert members here that have been there and done that.

Offline Wendy

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Re: G. Caldwell's Recipes
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2014, 02:35:44 PM »
Hi,

Well, I just made a the fourth batch of valencay from her book.  I use MM100 1/4 tsp,  Pen Cand 1/32 tsp and Geo Cand 1/64 tsp.  I usually do a 2 gallon batch with raw goat milk.  It works great. I've been get rave reviews.   I have used most of her recipes and they seem to work well.  I quite my job and have been home making cheese, every day for the last six months.  Trying to get some solid recipes before we go commercial (fingers crossed).  I'd have to say this book is really one of my go to books for recipe ideas and its great for pH levels.  I haven't found any other book really using pH.  Definitely my best cheese making book!

Offline andreark

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Re: G. Caldwell's Recipes
« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2014, 11:07:17 AM »
Thanks Wendy and I hope all goes well with your new adventure.   I have found more information in this book than I knew was
possible.  I just started the recipe for OULEOUT using raw Jersey milk.  This is going to actually be the first recipe of hers I've
tried.  I am hoping that it is similar to a Taleggio.  Does anyone here on the forum know if it is?

Thanks to all who replied,

andreark

Offline John@PC

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Re: G. Caldwell's Recipes
« Reply #9 on: February 23, 2014, 03:32:51 PM »
You may be able to find out more about Jos Vulto's Ouleout (named after Ouleout Creek?) on his website or FB page.  Gianiclis also has a short essay on him in the sidebar by the recipe, if I remember right.  I wondered if it was closer to a Munster as she talked about them right before the recipe.


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Offline andreark

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Re: G. Caldwell's Recipes
« Reply #10 on: February 23, 2014, 04:55:47 PM »
John,

She also talks about Taleggio on the same page that you mentioned.  The reason I wondered if it was close to Taleggio, was that the Ouleout recipe contains
TA 050 as does Peter Dixons recipe for Taleggio..

I guess I'll find out.  Have a great Sunday evening. 

andreark

Offline John@PC

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Re: G. Caldwell's Recipes
« Reply #11 on: February 24, 2014, 05:05:39 PM »
Thanks andreark.   Her book is wonderful but for some reason she carefully avoids referencing the common names of cheeses in most of recipes but gives it a generic type description, like "Hard cheese with small eyes" or "Semi-hard to hard cheese with large eyes".   It does make it a little difficult when you want to tell your friends what cheese they're sampling (in recognizable terms).  I guess that's what this forum is for  ^-^, and I certainly don't want to take anything away from her wonderful book!

Offline linuxboy

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Re: G. Caldwell's Recipes
« Reply #12 on: February 24, 2014, 06:01:37 PM »
From what Gianaclis has shared with me, she makes her cheese the same way I do. Meaning, without real recipes and more based on changing the parameters that affect core composition (MFFB, salt, and texture based on buffering/casein breakdown based on pH at rennet add, drain, and salt). So it makes a lot of sense how one basic recipe serves as the archetype foundation for many others. And replicating that basic recipe across many locations with differences in milk, terroir, and process produces differences in cheese. Makes it easier to talk archetype and not specific cheese name.
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.