Author Topic: flocculation and multiplier questions  (Read 257 times)

Offline scasnerkay

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flocculation and multiplier questions
« on: January 25, 2014, 06:30:55 PM »
I want to better understand the why's of the process...
Some makes might suggest a shorter flocculation time of 10 mins, and some might suggest a longer time, closer to 15 mins. All else being equal, how will this change the outcome? In order to attain this shorter or longer time, I assume that would be a bit less or a bit more rennet...
Now if we use a 2.5 versus a 3.5 flocculation multiplier, all else being equal, how will this change the outcome?

Susan
Susan


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Offline linuxboy

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Re: flocculation and multiplier questions
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2014, 06:40:37 PM »
Time to floc is mostly about tradition because rennet is added at different pHs, leading to differences in time to floc. EG, alpine can be 15-18 min time to floc, and cheddar might be 10-12 mins. Because cheddar rennet pH is somewhere around 6.55-6.6 and alpine might be around 6.7. The amt usually doesn't change that much.

When the amt is different, it's usually done to create a specific bell curve for maturation, to create optimum sales for the defined duration of optimum quality on the curve.

floc multiplier is about moisture. Longer set time = larger floc multiplier = more moisture in the cheese.
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Offline scasnerkay

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Re: flocculation and multiplier questions
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2014, 06:56:54 PM »
Thanks Pav. In most semi-hard cheeses, aren't we looking at a 0.1 drop from the starting pH, as the time to add the rennet? Or in alpine cheeses, is the rennet added before the 0.1 drop, so coagulation takes longer, and v/v for a cheese that ripens longer?
How does the amount of rennet change the bell curve for maturation?
Susan

Offline linuxboy

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Re: flocculation and multiplier questions
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2014, 08:06:48 PM »
Quote
In most semi-hard cheeses, aren't we looking at a 0.1 drop from the starting pH,
When using DVI, yes. This is to try and mirror traditional cheesemaking as much as possible. DVI changes the dynamics of the acidity vs bulk cultures.

Quote
in alpine cheeses, the rennet added before the 0.1 drop, so coagulation takes longer, and v/v for a cheese that ripens longer?
yes, this. Though in alpine styles, it is not so much rennet that helps with maturation (it's denatured), it's plasmin. We try for a longer time to floc/higher rennet in alpines to achieve correct buffering kinetics. Or to put it another way, to retain a lot of calcium.

Quote
How does the amount of rennet change the bell curve for maturation?
Works in combination with the set time, culture selection, and affinage. More rennet generally means a bit more flavor development potential and breakdown, but lower usable optimal life to sell. We're talking very fine tweaks, though. It's like saying, I want a 4 month window of optimum flavor coupled with a 4 month affinage vs 6 month affinage and 5 month window. That's often how rennet amts are tweaked on the floor, also taking milk specifics into account in terms of composition.
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