Author Topic: Caerphilly #1 (and 2?)  (Read 1063 times)

Offline Spoons

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Re: Caerphilly #1 (and 2?)
« Reply #30 on: July 25, 2014, 07:37:56 PM »
It's basically liquid plastic that has a mould inhibitor. It hardens after a few hours. You apply 2-3 coats. It's not air-tight, so the cheese still develops a rind underneath, but it does slow down drying considerably. I'm a huge fan because it's low maintenance. Some peeps here prefer the traditional way. So it's all a matter of preference.

I included a pic while I was applying coating with a sponge. I have since been using a natural bristle brush because the sponge wastes too much coating. The cheap plastic kitchen brushes are horrible for this task.

The cream coating comes in a few colours. Black, yellow, clear and red. You can see one of my goudas in my avatar with a yellow coating (it comes out orange).

Most cheesemaking suppliers have them. Here's one example:
http://www.glengarrycheesemaking.on.ca/wax-and-coating/cheese-coating/cheese-coating-from-csk-holland/
- Eric


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Offline Boofer

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Re: Caerphilly #1 (and 2?)
« Reply #31 on: July 25, 2014, 08:16:14 PM »
I've seen people talking about cream coating cheese, but I haven't seen (or really searched) for what they mean. Since we're talking about it, could you explain what exactly you are doing?

What sort of cream are we talking about?

When are you putting it on?

What sort of prep are you doing before you put it on? (or is cheese specific?)

Do you have a maybe have a link to a bigger discussion?

Thanks :D
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Offline Stu

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Re: Caerphilly #1 (and 2?)
« Reply #32 on: July 26, 2014, 08:35:27 AM »
Awesome information. Thank you!

Offline Stu

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Re: Caerphilly #1 (and 2?)
« Reply #33 on: July 28, 2014, 09:45:09 AM »
So, it's been 4 weeks since I made this, and the mold kept getting fuzzier. It also seems that my cheese fridge is too dry (something I've worried about), and the rind started to crack. These cheeses aren't very tall, so I was concerned that if I let it go, it would just mold all the way through. So yesterday we opened it up.

After cutting around the mold, I have (what I think is) a decent cheese. It's salty and a little bit chewy/crumbly. It's hard to explain. It's not too sharp, but certainly a lot more flavor than my Wensleydale from a week ago. All in all, I'm pleased for my second try.

I do still have one under wax that I'm going to let keep aging. It will probably stay in the fridge until I run out of room. That means another 2-3 cheeses. Which leads me to my next conundrum... what should I try next. :D

Offline awakephd

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Re: Caerphilly #1 (and 2?)
« Reply #34 on: July 28, 2014, 12:39:33 PM »
Stu, have you tried a Lancashire? If not, I highly recommend it -- not a hard make, and it matures in 6 weeks (or longer, but I haven't yet been able to hold out any longer than that). I have been using the recipe reported by MrsKK, which is basically the recipe in 200 Easy Cheeses, but without letting the curds rest overnight before pressing.


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Offline Stu

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Re: Caerphilly #1 (and 2?)
« Reply #35 on: July 28, 2014, 12:55:06 PM »
I've actually had Lancashire. It was one that I was thinking of trying to make, and one of the stores here carries (or carried? I haven't looked recently) it.

To be honest, the taste was a little boring :D That could be the manufacturer though. But, I guess it's a young cheese, there isn't much time to develop interesting flavors.

After looking around the forums, I was strongly considering making a Jack (something that ages in the order of weeks, not months). But, I might try my hand at Lancashire after. If I do that, I should have a couple different things coming of age in the same time-frame.

Offline awakephd

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Re: Caerphilly #1 (and 2?)
« Reply #36 on: July 29, 2014, 12:58:56 PM »
Hmm ... the two Lanc's that I have made and eaten thus far have not been boring at all. Not sharp like an aged cheddar, but still quite a lot of flavor for such a short-aged cheese -- certainly as much flavor as the Caerphilly's I've made.

I have another Lanc in the cave now ... maybe I can hold out long enough to see how it tastes when it gets really aged, like 8 weeks instead of 6. :)

Offline Stu

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Re: Caerphilly #1 (and 2?)
« Reply #37 on: July 29, 2014, 04:49:14 PM »
Sorry, I just meant "boring" in regards to other, longer aged, cheeses. I could make more short aged cheeses (and probably should), but parts of me want to make something that will be stuck in the fridge for 12 months :D

Offline Rizzo

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Re: Caerphilly #1 (and 2?)
« Reply #38 on: July 29, 2014, 08:24:45 PM »
Stu, I can sympathise with you regarding the Lancashire.
There seem to be a few store bought cheeses, and cheesemaking recipes that masquerade as Lancashire.
I made one to the 200 Easy cheeses recipe, and whereas it was a success, and a pleasantly tasting cheese, it was nothing like a REAL Lancashire. More like a regular Cheddar.

In my humble experience, living in Yorkshire for 1/2 my life, (adjacent county to Lancashire), I would eat Lancashire cheese regularly.
A proper Lancashire should be crumbly, moist, and with a lovely sharp edge to it.  I understand that you have to use 3 days worth of curds to get 'this taste' into your make.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2014, 02:32:46 AM by Rizzo »

Offline Boofer

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Re: Caerphilly #1 (and 2?)
« Reply #39 on: July 30, 2014, 07:03:12 PM »
something that will be stuck in the fridge for 12 months :D
I don't look at it as being "stuck" in the cave...rather that the cheese is fortunate enough to luxuriate in the climate-controlled environment that helps it to achieve its delightful character and palate-pleasing nuance. ;)

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Offline Rizzo

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Re: Caerphilly #1 (and 2?)
« Reply #40 on: July 30, 2014, 10:16:12 PM »
ah Boofer...such poetry. A cheese for your prose!