Author Topic: Hello from North Central Texas  (Read 119 times)

Offline debbielincoln

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Hello from North Central Texas
« on: February 24, 2014, 11:28:21 AM »
I have been making cheese weekly for only a couple months now. First efforts were dreadful, but better equipment, attention to detail (and sound advice) seem to be improving my results.
I am blessed to live on a farm and have 2 milk cows - the second one just freshened this past November and is providing an abundance of milk, hence the need to use it up in the form of cheese.
Right now I have only made cheddar and one washed curd (Gouda) using meso or buttermilk starter.
I have not yet attempted any thermo cheeses yet.
We just sampled a wedge from a batch made in late December and it was wonderful. One from earlier was very bitter.
I will learn with ya'lls help, I hope!

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Offline Gürkan Yeniçeri

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Re: Hello from North Central Texas
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2014, 02:55:51 PM »
Welcome to the forum Debbie.
With two cows you have and abundance of milk, look into storage and affinage options available to you, a large cheese cave is a must I recon.

Offline debbielincoln

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Re: Hello from North Central Texas
« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2014, 05:56:47 PM »
Thank you,  Gürkan Yeniçeri, for the rec. Right now I have a small refrigerator that maintains 55*F.  I have larger one on my list of "wants", but for now I will be happy with that one.  I think a true "cave" may be a bit more than I could wish for!
I do have questions about Ph and how to test for it and adjust, etc. Can you direct me to a thread that will help?

Professional Artist living on a farm with a wealth of inspiration

Offline Gürkan Yeniçeri

  • The one who masters temperature and humidity can make any cheese.
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Re: Hello from North Central Texas
« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2014, 10:41:11 PM »
Try this Debbie http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,2826.msg24091.html#msg24091

Also you can use the search function at the top of the page.

Get yourself a digital pH meter first. You can get a lot of advice on the forum by searching. As you are dealing with raw milk, it is important to know the pH at certain stages of making.

Also aim for books that gives the pH markers for recipes. Gianaclis Caldwell's Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking is one of them. Also there was a pdf sheet from DeeJayDebi which shows the certain pH markers for different cheeses.

That small fridge will be full soon, can't you build an underground cave by calling some friends and paying them with cheese?  ;D

Offline debbielincoln

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Re: Hello from North Central Texas
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2014, 10:22:09 AM »
Thank you so much for the advice and reference material. I do know I need to start paying attention to Ph. I have proved that I can maintain temp and pay attention to timing. Ph monitoring (and adjusting?) seems to be the next stage in advancement.
Big sigh.  :)

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