Author Topic: Bitto  (Read 1060 times)

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Bitto
« Reply #15 on: March 28, 2014, 11:08:20 PM »
The make would be the same, except drop the lipase and replace 10-20% of the cow's milk with your goat's milk.  Proceed as normal.  Let us know how it turns out for you if you make it.

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Offline Pete S

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Re: Bitto
« Reply #16 on: March 29, 2014, 06:36:38 AM »
  I just used straight fresh goats milk ,leaving out the lipase and lowering the temp. accordingly.

It is 2 weeks  old and is in the cave so it will be a while till I know how it turns out.

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THE MORE I LEARN----THE MORE THERE IS TO LEARN---PETE

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Bitto
« Reply #17 on: March 29, 2014, 02:55:45 PM »
Hi Pete S,

That should be interesting.  Bitto is a mixed milk cheese, with 10 - 20% goats milk being the minimum and maximum - but it also has to be milk from the proper mountain regions, and from breeds of goats that live there (many of which are now endangered).  So, nothing we do can be "real", so our own creations are often the most interesting.

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Bitto
« Reply #18 on: April 11, 2014, 10:33:34 PM »
There was a crack in the rind, but it looks more like it was poked with something.  I don't recall dropping it, but it looks like it hit the edge of a chopstick.  Anyway, that corrupted the rind, and sure enough, there's been a blue incursion.  So, this morning I cut that out, and I think I've got it (so it doesn't progress through the cheese).  I then filled the hole with regular table salt (to sterilize the wound, so to speak) and will dump the excess salt later this after noon.  Will see how that goes.  If it looks to be progressing, I may not be able to age this one much longer, so I'll try it young and see if it is one I might make again (who am I kidding, of course I will, if it's good, I'll make it, if I'm not pleased, I'll just assume it was too young and will try again.)

- Jeff
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Offline Matthewcraig

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Re: Bitto
« Reply #19 on: April 12, 2014, 03:23:52 AM »
a remember reading this article and i though someone may find it interesting, i also presume you are not planning on ageing it for 15 years  ;D http://travel.cnn.com/hong-kong/eat/oldest-cheese-world-225287
If cheese was as easy as boiling an egg 8)


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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Bitto
« Reply #20 on: April 12, 2014, 03:49:35 PM »
Hi Matthew,

Yah, I saw some other articles about it being aged up to 10 years, but didn't see this one.  I don't think I'll take it out quite that long given the hole in it!  I think this one will be eaten quite soon, actually, given the imperfection.  The 2nd one, though, I'll take out a year I suspect.  I might make one and hide it on myself for a few years.  seems to work well with my keys anyway. ha!

- Jeff
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Offline Flound

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Re: Bitto
« Reply #21 on: April 12, 2014, 06:41:44 PM »
Every time I read this thread, Peter Gabriel's 'Biko' runs through my head...
Dyslexics Untied - musings from an easily distracted mind
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Bitto
« Reply #22 on: May 21, 2014, 01:20:19 AM »
Hi,

Well, because there was rind corruption, with blue mould filling in the hole, I decided this one needed to be cut into early.  Recommended minimum ageing is 70 days, and it's now 73 days old, so under the knife.  The paste is much drier than a meso cheese of the same age, but it has a very nice flavour, no bitterness, definitely in the swiss type.  I will be making another one of these to age out much longer.  I've got some small eye formation, due to the prop. shermi added (even though the package says it is supposed to be low gass producing strain, it's clearly not no gas!)   Rind is edible, a bit chewy but no off flavours (it stayed quite clean, so not attacked by wild moulds).  Best news is that the blue mould has not gotten into the cheese itself!  The internal paste is solid (despite the eyes) and has kept the mould at bay.  I bet this would be great melted on a ham sandwhich. MMmmmmm!

Anyway, thank you Deejay Debbie for posting this years ago.  It will be made again.  Nice.

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Offline GlabrousD

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Re: Bitto
« Reply #23 on: May 21, 2014, 02:45:40 AM »
Yet another fantastic looking cheese Jeff. AC2U.

The rind looks delicious... something nice to gnaw on with a beer and some pork scratchings I feel... well that would be my preference anyhow :)

Cheers, GD.

Offline Boofer

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Re: Bitto
« Reply #24 on: May 21, 2014, 07:49:38 AM »
Good job, Jeff. Yum. A cheese for this effort.

Yeah, where's the ham? ;)

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Offline H-K-J

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Re: Bitto
« Reply #25 on: May 21, 2014, 08:39:17 AM »
Nice Jeff :) pastrami and rye bread would go well with this also yum yum!!
AC4U  ;D
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Offline jwalker

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Re: Bitto
« Reply #26 on: May 21, 2014, 10:35:31 AM »
Another great cheese by the "Hammster".   ;D

Looks good , A cheese to you !

The rind is edible , but is it good ?
Would natural rind be the only way to go with this , or do you think it would be as good waxed or coated ?

Only wondering , because I hate having to waste any cheese by cutting off rind , I coat or wax most of mine for that reason , but sometimes they're just not the same.
No..........I'm not a professional CheeseMaker , but I play one on TV.

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Bitto
« Reply #27 on: May 21, 2014, 01:11:34 PM »
Thanks everyone! 

Yes, pastrami would be great too H-K-J!  I'm not one to turn down a second sandwich, so bring 'em on! :)

And jwalker, the rind is good.  It's chewy, but quite tasty.  I do a lot of wild rinds, and you don't lose much when you cut them off (the moulds don't penetrate that far) but the flavour they impart goes throughout.  Waxing or coating means, in one respect, you're throwing out an entire cheese worth of flavours.

But, in the end, it's an empirical question.  You must make four, wax one, cream coat one, vac seal one, and natural rind for the other.  Then, let us know which is best! :)

- Jeff
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Offline Geo

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Re: Bitto
« Reply #28 on: May 21, 2014, 03:38:58 PM »
Lovely looking cheese, Jeff, as always.

As for the challenge...I'm short of cheese-making time as I'm in a crazy busy time between now and the end of the year, but that's just the kind of thing I like to do. :D

Offline GlabrousD

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Re: Bitto
« Reply #29 on: May 22, 2014, 12:44:53 AM »
You must make four, wax one, cream coat one, vac seal one, and natural rind for the other.  Then, let us know which is best! :)

Oh for Heaven's sake! I already have Cave Deficiency Syndrome... the FLW won't let me convert a spare room to a cave and we already have four fridges... Aaaaargh! :)

Cheers, GD.