Author Topic: Culture Question  (Read 1331 times)

Offline Ananke

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Culture Question
« on: March 10, 2014, 03:36:05 PM »
I would like to try making a Maasdam cheese and I want to read up on Swiss style cheeses as much as I can before I even think about starting it as it's a wee bit out of my comfort zone.

The website I'm reading right now says that "The use of a Mesophilic rather than a Thermophilic culture is used"  Yet the Thermophilic culture that I have (Choozit TA61) says it's for Swiss cheese and I'm confused.  If anyone could help I'd appreciate it.

Also, does anyone have a recipe that would be easy for a newbie to follow?
The years have been kind to me, it's the weekends that done the damage.


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Offline Al Lewis

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Re: Culture Question
« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2014, 04:10:17 PM »
You might want to send a PM to Alpkäserei and see if he can help you.

Offline george (MaryJ)

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Re: Culture Question
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2014, 06:40:59 AM »
Also, I believe Boofer has made Maasdam once or thrice - search the forum for 'Maasdam' and I'm sure you'll find his threads on his makes.
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Culture Question
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2014, 08:23:43 AM »
Also, does anyone have a recipe that would be easy for a newbie to follow?
I have had some success with this style:
There are a number of attachments on the first posting which should help to clear up your confusion. ;)   Good luck.

Hi, george! :)

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Offline jwalker

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Re: Culture Question
« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2014, 08:37:16 AM »
I've seen recipes that call for one or the other , some even use a hybrid of both cultures together.
Here is one make you could probably adjust for quantity.

http://www.milkme.co.nz/?p=1187
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Offline Ananke

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Re: Culture Question
« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2014, 06:46:17 PM »
Thanks everyone for your help, I'll read through those links.

Jwalker, I remember reading somewhere about using both types of culture.

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Offline Boofer

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Re: Culture Question
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2014, 11:46:54 AM »
If you read the Alp D pdf you'll see a mix of meso & thermo.  I included it in "My Sweet Maasdam". A)

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Offline Ananke

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Re: Culture Question
« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2014, 12:05:48 PM »
Thanks Boofer.

My propionic culture and cheese salt arrived yesterday, I couldn't justify buying another culture at this stage so have gone with my thermophillic that says for swiss cheese.  I'm pretty much following your recipe just now but with 20ltrs of whole milk . 

My rennet was added over an hour ago and I'm still not getting a clean break, although it's almost there now.  I'm worried that this length of time will affect the final cheese.  Oh well, time will tell I suppose :)

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Offline Ananke

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Re: Culture Question
« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2014, 02:18:52 PM »
Well, this is looking like a disaster :( Everything was going so well too.

I seem to have a problem with my coagulation, 2hrs later and it's still not set properly.  I've cut the "curds" and stirred them with the whisk and it's all wrong.  Rather than throw all this milk out, I've added more rennet, I don't even know if that is something that can be done...
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Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Culture Question
« Reply #9 on: March 15, 2014, 03:12:39 PM »
Forget the "directions" and quadruple your rennet next time. Every type and batch of rennet varies. Search on flocculation.
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Offline Ananke

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Re: Culture Question
« Reply #10 on: March 15, 2014, 03:41:46 PM »
Forget the "directions" and quadruple your rennet next time. Every type and batch of rennet varies. Search on flocculation.

Thanks Sailor Con Queso,  I think you are right, I tried to make a mozzarella the other night and had the same problem, my rennet is still in date and has been kept in the fridge but I think it must have lost some strength.

I have read up on flocculation but didn't feel experienced enough to add that to the "to do list" of what is already a complicated cheese for me. 

Adding the second lot of rennet didn't make any difference in 30mins so I've just put what I have into the press and will see what happens.

I definately want to try this one again.

The years have been kind to me, it's the weekends that done the damage.

Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Culture Question
« Reply #11 on: March 16, 2014, 10:56:37 AM »
Testing flocculation is easy - and important. Add rennet and then put a small, lightweight bowl on top of the milk. At first, the bowl will spin very easily. When the bowl will no longer spin, that's the flocculation point. That should be around 12-15 minutes. That lets you know how well your rennet is working. If the floc time is too long, add more rennet NEXT TIME.
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Offline jwalker

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Re: Culture Question
« Reply #12 on: March 16, 2014, 12:11:58 PM »
Forget the "directions" and quadruple your rennet next time. Every type and batch of rennet varies. Search on flocculation.

Thanks Sailor Con Queso,  I think you are right, I tried to make a mozzarella the other night and had the same problem.

So it has happened more than once , I've had that happen too , sometimes it's just the milk and no matter how much rennet you use , it just doesn't set properly.

I have found that if the curd breaks up very small and won't separate from the whey , add VERY hot water and wash the curd , even if you aren't doing a washed curd cheese , it will help set the curd and separate it from the whey.

Yes , it will change the outcome of the cheese , it won't be the same cheese you set out too make , but it will salvage the batch , and in my experience , it has produce a very edible cheese every time , in fact some were downright delicious.

And being as you started with a thermo anyway , the hot wash won't hurt it.

I do this for a worst case scenario , when you think all is lost.
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Offline GlabrousD

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Re: Culture Question
« Reply #13 on: April 06, 2014, 02:31:28 AM »
Thanks for the tip jwalker... that's a very useful idea for future problems. I really hate to throw out milk so a "cook it and see" solution will be perfect. Might even invent a new cheese :)

Cheers, GD.

Offline Ananke

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Re: Culture Question
« Reply #14 on: April 10, 2014, 10:57:27 AM »
Thanks Sailor, that doesn't sound so scary and I'll try that with my next cheese.

Great tip, thanks JWalker.

I put it out in the cold cellar for a week then brought it inside to the warm for two weeks to form holes and it has puffed up quite a bit so that's a good sign.  I will put it back out into the cellar now, how long would you suggest I leave it there?



The years have been kind to me, it's the weekends that done the damage.