Author Topic: Affinage of B. Linens types - some at 55, some at 45, Why  (Read 340 times)

Offline andreark

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Affinage of B. Linens types - some at 55, some at 45, Why
« on: March 11, 2014, 12:26:03 PM »
I have read many times that B. Lins washed rind types shoud age at 55ish.  Then why does Taleggio need to be
aged at 45 ish?

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Offline linuxboy

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Re: Affinage of B. Linens types - some at 55, some at 45, Why
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2014, 12:32:54 PM »
Speed of development. There's no hard and fast rule. Age at the rate at which you want it to develop to get the right flavor and color. IMHO 55F is too high for stinkies. You can make taleggio at 55F, too, will just age faster
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Offline andreark

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Re: Affinage of B. Linens types - some at 55, some at 45, Why
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2014, 12:53:37 PM »
LB, thanks for answering so quickly....

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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Affinage of B. Linens types - some at 55, some at 45, Why
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2014, 02:39:16 PM »
Thanks.  And for those who work in metric, that's the difference between 7 and 13 C (7.2 and 12.8 if you want single digit precision).

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline andreark

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Re: Affinage of B. Linens types - some at 55, some at 45, Why
« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2014, 02:49:32 PM »
Ok now I have another question about Taleggio.  I have 4 or 5 recipes for it.  Some say to let ripen initally for 90 minutes, some say 60 minutes.  And the last one I saw said to ripen at only 40 - 45 minutes.

I use only raw Jersey milk.   Doesn't letting the milk I use ripen for too long make the surface too acidic for B. Lins?

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Offline linuxboy

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Re: Affinage of B. Linens types - some at 55, some at 45, Why
« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2014, 03:36:43 PM »
Quote
I use only raw Jersey milk.   Doesn't letting the milk I use ripen for too long make the surface too acidic for B. Lins?
No. Don't conflate ripening, which is about casein degradation, with post-make surface deacidification, which is about lactic acid consumption by yeasts. You ripen to a target pH so that you rennet and by the time you drain, you are at 6.4-6.45. It's a thermo style cheese that relies on a good bit of calcium retention for the proper paste. Else, it'd be too runny.
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Offline andreark

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Re: Affinage of B. Linens types - some at 55, some at 45, Why
« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2014, 04:08:23 PM »
Sometimes 'conflate means fusing, sometimes it means confusing'  I am thinking you mean CONFUSE. 

One recipe I have says "Heat milk to 92.  Sprinkle starter and cultures on top to dissolve.  Stir vigorously
then let RIPEN 60 minutes. 

I thought that the acid formed AFTER the starters and cultures were added.  If not then, when DOES it become
too acidic for the B. Linens to live.

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Offline linuxboy

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Re: Affinage of B. Linens types - some at 55, some at 45, Why
« Reply #7 on: March 11, 2014, 04:22:56 PM »
If you can make sense of my writing, you're doing better than me ... :-\

ripening is to produce some acid to break apart casein bonds, which makes the final cheese gooey. It also helps the rennet to work a bit faster. The time you spend ripening determines the extent those bonds break.

b linens surface ripening is way different. That cascade takes an acidic cheese, which has a pH of 4.7-5.2, and uses yeasts to deacidify the surface. When the surface is deacidified to ~5.8, b linens can start growing. B linens can live at a lowish pH, such as 5.0. It won't grow, however. So by conflate I tried to say fuse the two dynamics. One dynamic, ripening, is about breaking apart calcium bonds. the other, dynamic, b linens growth, is about using yeasts to bring up the surface pH, so that the b linens can grow.
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Offline andreark

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Re: Affinage of B. Linens types - some at 55, some at 45, Why
« Reply #8 on: March 11, 2014, 05:07:01 PM »
OK

1)  So ripening has to do with the process that the milk goes through AFTER we add the starters, etc.

AND ALSO MEANS:

2) The surface ripening by BLs and yeasts.

If those 2 statement are relatively correct,  why when writing a recipe for cheese, do some people say
to ripen the milk prior to any additions?  That would be a 3rd place or time that the cheese/milk is ripened. 
Why don't you start a new set of CONCISE definitions for novices?

I have had success making a Taleggio, , , THE FIRST TIME!!!

I am back to trying again, after a year.  The last 4 recent attempts got lovely and soft, but no orange. And of course, no stinky flavor!!!!
They were in a cooler that was 55 degrees. (Next attempt, I will put them in my 45 degree frig.)  They were also at 90% RH.
I washed and turned as I should.  There was Geo and BLs in the base.  Should I add something extra?

I am ready to scream......

Thanks a bunch LB,

andreark




Offline andreark

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Re: Affinage of B. Linens types - some at 55, some at 45, Why
« Reply #9 on: March 11, 2014, 10:55:59 PM »
If anyone is listening,  I have one last idea.   I have kept these cheeses sealed in Rubbermaid' type containers.  They are air tight.  Do these cheeses
require airing?  If so, maybe that is the reason they wouldn't react as desired.  Anyone have an answer?

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Offline linuxboy

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Re: Affinage of B. Linens types - some at 55, some at 45, Why
« Reply #10 on: March 11, 2014, 11:40:34 PM »
b linens requires oxygen and air exchange for healthy growth. air out.
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Offline andreark

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Re: Affinage of B. Linens types - some at 55, some at 45, Why
« Reply #11 on: March 12, 2014, 12:00:35 AM »
LB, what a prince 'of cheese' you are.   

Maybe this is the reason for no color.  The last time (when I made an orange baby) they weren't in airtight containers.

whoopee!!!

The next delivery of Jersey raw is Thurs. I will air them daily and will let you all know the result.

andreark