Author Topic: TC 257  (Read 705 times)

Offline NimbinValley

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TC 257
« on: March 29, 2014, 10:36:15 PM »
Hi.

I'm looking for any information on a culture called TC257 - I think it's a Hansen culture used for continental hard cooked cheeses, but I could be wrong. Any information will be greatly appreciated. It was suggested  to me but I can not find any reference to it anywhere so maybe I copied it down wrongly...

Thanks.

NV.


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Offline NimbinValley

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Re: TC 257
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2014, 09:07:07 PM »
Hi.  I have had some luck - TC257 is a frozen culture.  I need to know if anyone has used it (Hansens) or if there is a freeze dried alternative.

Thanks.

NV.

Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: TC 257
« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2014, 01:08:45 PM »
Frozen cultures are not just normal "frozen", they need to be maintained at sub zero temperatures. Consequently, they are not easy to work with.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
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Offline NimbinValley

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Re: TC 257
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2014, 11:30:50 PM »
hi sailor.

Yes i understand about the frozen thing thats whY I'm hoping to find a freeze dried alternative to TC257.

nv

Offline WovenMeadows

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Re: TC 257
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2014, 10:14:30 AM »
What is it about that particular culture that you want? That you couldn't approximate by blending other readily available dried frozen cultures?


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Offline NimbinValley

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Re: TC 257
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2014, 08:09:34 AM »
That's a good question...I'm kind of fumbling in the dark and I don't know enough to ask the right questions sorry.  I was recommended this culture as being a classic for Comte.  So I'm just trying to find out more about it and possible alternatives.

Online ArnaudForestier

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Re: TC 257
« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2014, 11:47:00 AM »
Nimbin, I just looked on the Hansen site and came up with zero results, searching for TC 257.  Are you sure that's the right name? 

Can I ask, are you looking for starter cultures to use in a Comte, or rind/affinage materials?
- Paul

Offline NimbinValley

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Re: TC 257
« Reply #7 on: May 22, 2014, 03:12:19 PM »
Hi Arnaud.  Yes, TC 257 has been discontinued.  I am looking for starter cultures/adjuncts for Comte along with affiange materials. Thanks.

Online ArnaudForestier

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Re: TC 257
« Reply #8 on: May 22, 2014, 04:21:23 PM »
Nimbin, great discussion here.  Follow Pav's guidance.  He's my guru.  The basic thermophilic starters are ST, LH and/or lactobacillus bulgaricus, with a host of mesophilic lactobacilli that are found in raw milk (or added, in pasteurized - e.g., LBC80,  Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus), as well as a nominal amount of PS (I would forget adding propionic, if using raw milk - if it was grazed milk, PS should be in there).  It really all depends on your milk, if you're using raw, you can depend on your milk more for its complex contributions to the cheese.  Otherwise, you'll have to play with added cultures more. 

Affinage is a standard linens-cascading wash, though like Beaufort, it's an incredible diversity of species apparently dominated by various coryneform and micrococci strains (PDF).  I've found comte to be quite mild compared to other gruyeres, esp. compared to Beaufort.  It has a low salt content - .4 to 1%; a fairly low propionic acid content (.1-.4%, compared to .25-.5% in an emmental), so keep that in mind.  If you read French, let me know - I've some good studies on Comte specifically. 

Hope this is helpful.  I'd really soak in the above-referenced thread, particularly Pav's commentary.  Good luck!  A wonderful cheese to master!
« Last Edit: May 22, 2014, 04:38:21 PM by ArnaudForestier »
- Paul

Offline NimbinValley

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Re: TC 257
« Reply #9 on: May 22, 2014, 05:21:27 PM »
Thanks Arnaud.  I don't speak French, but my colleague does - he's French.  Any resources would be appreciated.


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Online ArnaudForestier

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Re: TC 257
« Reply #10 on: May 22, 2014, 05:39:49 PM »
Great, Paul.  Check out the PDF above.  Others:

Affinage et qualité du Gruyère de Comté

Characterizing ripening of gruyere de Comte : Influence of time x temperature and salting conditions on eye and slit formation (This one's in English)

short AOC bit

In general, Lait Dairy Journal is an awesome resource - most articles I've found have been free.  This is just a page on Comte - check out the numerous articles.

I am more interested in Beaufort, so that's where my research tends to go.  Hope the above is some use, and if I can find more in my assortment, I'll zip it over.  Good luck!

- Paul

Offline NimbinValley

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Re: TC 257
« Reply #11 on: May 23, 2014, 01:34:29 AM »
Merci