Author Topic: cam_bert's Camembert Making #1  (Read 3126 times)

Offline cam_bert

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Re: cam_bert's Camembert Making #1
« Reply #15 on: March 30, 2009, 09:20:46 PM »
And therein is the question that most of us are asking.

So far it seems to come down to two issues, the ability for the ammonia gasses to escape, and the cheese to be kept cool enough.

Proper wrapping and air flow is important, and I have resorted to aging these in the fridge for a couple of weeks longer, as it seems to give me better success.
HTH

So aging longer times makes the cheese stronger in flavour I presume?
Warmer Conditions - stronger????
Cooler Conditions - Milder???
(Obviously within the temperature range required for cheese making)

Has it got anything to do with the amount of cheese mould used?


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Offline John (CH)

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Re: cam_bert's Camembert Making #1
« Reply #16 on: April 05, 2009, 12:13:06 PM »
Cam

Sorry, didn't see this post and answered most of your questions in a somewhat similar post you made here.

Most of us are having troubles with our Camemberts getting the right pate consistency, and it looks like it is down to a both mold forming and aging temperatures. If go warmer then get runnier cheese.

I don't think it has to do with amount of mold as that is self replicating.

If not too late, would love to see pictures of your cut Camemberts and what temp you aged them at.

Offline Tea

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Re: cam_bert's Camembert Making #1
« Reply #17 on: April 05, 2009, 03:12:13 PM »
Storing for a longer period as cooler temps does not give stronger flavour, it just allows for a slower ripening of the cheese, which seems to be more favourable than ripening at a higher temp quicker, which does seen to give a much stronger flavour.
I also think that the larger the area that they are originally bloomed in, also help in dispersing the ammonia gasses, where as a small closed off container seems to retain this, which also seems to taint the flavour of the final cheese.
This has been my experience anyway.

Offline cam_bert

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Re: cam_bert's Camembert Making #1
« Reply #18 on: May 03, 2009, 04:13:46 AM »
Hi all again!

I just checked on the remaining Camembert wheels left in wrapped in the fridge and noticed the edges have become very dried out and it looks like some white (bad) mould is growing.

I wouldn't have thought this would happen this quickly!!!
Can anyone shed some light for me?

I will post a photo later.

Offline cam_bert

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Re: cam_bert's Camembert Making #1
« Reply #19 on: May 08, 2009, 02:23:50 AM »
Hi all again!

I just checked on the remaining Camembert wheels left in wrapped in the fridge and noticed the edges have become very dried out and it looks like some white (bad) mould is growing.

I wouldn't have thought this would happen this quickly!!!
Can anyone shed some light for me?

I will post a photo later.


I have taken some photos of the remaining Camemberts which have dried out a lot on the edges and seem to have a bad white mould and also discolouration growing. I would not have thought this would happen so quickly as they are stored correctly in the fridge and where fine during aging and tasting. I have noticed when I turn the Camembert wheel over it seems fine on the otherside... so it is only the visible side which is effected.

Any ideas or help much appreciated! Thanks!


Click here for full size picture --> http://s30.photobucket.com/albums/c329/benjyman/cheese/Full%20Sized%20Images/?action=view&current=a87f11a1.jpg

(Note: Once you have clicked on the link you need to click the photo again to make it full size)


Click here for full size picture --> http://s30.photobucket.com/albums/c329/benjyman/cheese/Full%20Sized%20Images/?action=view&current=bb9822ba.jpg

(Note: Once you have clicked on the link you need to click the photo again to make it full size)


Click here for full size picture --> http://s30.photobucket.com/albums/c329/benjyman/cheese/Full%20Sized%20Images/?action=view&current=6442ffdd.jpg

(Note: Once you have clicked on the link you need to click the photo again to make it full size)

Thanks Again! :)



« Last Edit: May 08, 2009, 02:32:56 AM by cam_bert »


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Offline cam_bert

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Re: cam_bert's Camembert Making #1
« Reply #20 on: June 16, 2009, 01:41:21 AM »
^^ Bump ^^

Surely someone has some ideas? I would have thought that it would last a while in the fridge before going bad! It is not exactly old!!!!

Thanks

Offline mako

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Re: cam_bert's Camembert Making #1
« Reply #21 on: June 16, 2009, 02:44:16 AM »
That doesn't look too abnormal to me. January 24 to May 8 is, what, ~100 days? That's nearing the lifespan for a camembert. The outsides look a little rough, but nothing that would scare me off, frankly. How is the pate? dripping out like white soup, or soft and creamy? What's your refrigerator temp? And how were they wrapped? I don't know how'd they'd dry out wrapped in what looks like saran wrap.

Did you inoculate with a strain of B. Linens? Because I assume that'd contribute to the darkening of the rind. And how do you determine that it's a bad white mold forming -- the good while mold will definitely continue to propagate as the cheese ages, so... maybe that's nothing to worry about?

OK, that was a lot of questions. And I'm not sure I'd have any good reply to any of the answers, but those are the things that come to my mind, and more eyes on a problem are better than nothing.

The upshot from my perspective is: I'd probably skip the rind, and eat the pate if it tastes good (and if you like it strong, which I imagine it is). All this with a grain of salt, however, because I eat plenty of things I probably shouldn't.