Author Topic: Cold Smoking Cheese  (Read 2181 times)

Offline ibejaminben

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Cold Smoking Cheese
« on: July 22, 2009, 10:52:03 AM »
So today I am making my first Gouda and I want to smoke it. I have read other posts with ideas on how to smoke but I have a few more questions. One, at what stage do you smoke? After it is done air drying? Second, Deejay said not to have black or white smoke. What is the best way to ensure not over smoking and thereby bitter taste?
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Offline newbie001

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Re: Cold Smoking Cheese
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2009, 06:50:19 AM »
First you need to cold smoke it. Use some kind of box or enclosed area that has a pipe attached to the coal area. Usually a few feet away. I have used a whole in the ground for the coals and the wood chips and cover with a lid that has a chimney or a tube attached. YOu don't want the heat source too close or your cheese will melt or brown. I think many commercial cheeses actually use liquid smoke and don't actually smoke it.

Big clouds of white or black smoke are caused by build up of creosote which is bitter. You want to have the wood chips give off what Deb calls blue smoke.


Offline FRANCOIS

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Re: Cold Smoking Cheese
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2009, 04:09:21 PM »
Back in America I built a small wooden "closet" for smoking.  I drilled a 3" hole in the side and modified a grill to pipe smoke from the grill to the smoker.  To cool the smoke further I bent up a wire basket and hung it over the interior smoke entrance to the smoker.  When I'd smoke I would pack the wire basket full of ice.  The ice would cool the smoke (and melt!) condensing out any creosote and also providing humidity i the smoker which seamed to help with eveness of flavor on the rind.  I don't have photos sorry...

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Cold Smoking Cheese
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2009, 11:43:33 PM »
Good job Mai. Thin blue smoke! If you are just going to do a few cheeses and only cold smoke a quick smoker could be made from a coffee or other tin can, a soldering iron a cardboard box and a rack to set the chese on.

Poke a few small holes in opposite sides in the bottom of the box and one in the top for air circulation, put the soldering iron in the can of dry wood chips and set the cheese on some kind of rack.

As long as you can barelt see the smoke it's perfect! If you can smell it but not see it it is good - if it's thick and cloud like you will have nasty smoked cheese. Only smoke it for about 30 to 60 minutes. Then put it a bag in the fridge. Next day it will be wonderful. While it's still warm it's not really good it needs to blend through the cheese.

Offline Tom Turophile / CheeseStud

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Re: Cold Smoking Cheese
« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2009, 08:53:24 AM »
Youtube has a few videos on those homemade smokers.  The key for smoking cheese is the two chambers, so that only the smoke gets funneled to the target, and not the heat.
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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Cold Smoking Cheese
« Reply #5 on: July 24, 2009, 09:42:42 PM »
Or not to produce much heat.