Author Topic: Chipotle PepperJack  (Read 653 times)

Offline Gregore

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Re: Chipotle PepperJack
« Reply #15 on: April 10, 2017, 11:20:58 PM »
I do not think it is the pressure directly more that pressure expells whey quicker and gives a faster ph curve .

I agree and disagree with your professor ( assuming he used that exact wording )

Yes each of those things effect how fast the ph drops and if one is using a timed recipe then each of those and many others effect final ph , and the charctureistics of the cheese curds .  but final ph is more directly related to when you stop the ph drop with cooling and or salting .  And with a ph meter you just stop the ph drop when ever you hit your targets.




Offline Gregore

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Re: Chipotle PepperJack
« Reply #16 on: April 10, 2017, 11:24:52 PM »
Another way of saying what I mean by pressure effecting ph is

2 cheeses, both form same vat molded .....  cheese A not pressed and cheese B pressed  , I think that cheese B would hit  final target before cheese A

Offline Duntov

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Re: Chipotle PepperJack
« Reply #17 on: April 11, 2017, 05:41:04 AM »
Just my two cents.  I have done a few cheeses that I added peppers directly to the curds.  All of them tended to have issues knitting well.  I found that heating the curds in the mold helped the knitting more than pressure.  However, adding bits of dried fruit knit fine.  I also found that if I pressed with too much weight at the beginning, more moisture was retained but didn't necessary help the knitting.
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Offline DoctorCheese

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Re: Chipotle PepperJack
« Reply #18 on: April 11, 2017, 10:56:55 AM »
Just my two cents.  I have done a few cheeses that I added peppers directly to the curds.  All of them tended to have issues knitting well.
I think a number of characteristics of the chilis I added helped contribute to what was maybe already going to be a crumbly cheese. Most glaringly, chilis are acidic and eventhough I tried to neurtralize them, some acid will slowly leach out in to the cheese. Next time I will not leave so much plant matter in the final cheese and will try to raise the ph of the additives.
I am a cheese loving college student headed towards a PhD in Neuroscience working with what I have to produce some yummy morsels. Advice is always welcome!

Offline Duntov

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Re: Chipotle PepperJack
« Reply #19 on: April 11, 2017, 11:48:49 AM »
I think that just crushing the already dried peppers and adding them might work well.  The moisture of the cheese itself may re-hydrate the peppers.
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Offline DoctorCheese

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Re: Chipotle PepperJack
« Reply #20 on: April 11, 2017, 01:43:23 PM »
Aren't I supposed to boil for safety?
I am a cheese loving college student headed towards a PhD in Neuroscience working with what I have to produce some yummy morsels. Advice is always welcome!

Offline Duntov

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Re: Chipotle PepperJack
« Reply #21 on: April 11, 2017, 03:02:47 PM »
Aren't I supposed to boil for safety?

Dried herbs are used quite frequently.
The Rinds, they are a changin. 
- John