Author Topic: Can p. candidum grow if competing against p. roqueforti?  (Read 191 times)

Offline ZRedding

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Can p. candidum grow if competing against p. roqueforti?
« on: May 30, 2017, 12:28:55 PM »
Hello all. This is my first post to this forum.

I am attempting to make a batch of cambozolas. The make went well (used the New England Cheesemaking Supply Co. camblu recipe). I dried the cheeses for a couple days and then moved them to my mini-fridge cave for another two days (~50 F and 90%). I pierced the cheeses to allow the PR to grow. Two days after piercing I sprayed the cheeses with PC + GC dissolved in a brine solution in a spray bottle (.25 t salt, 1/4 c H2O, 1/8 t PC, 1/32 t GC). I did not see any white mold growth for the next three days but started to notice the blue showing at the sides and around the holes I had poked in top and bottom. I resprayed the cheeses thinking maybe the mold had not been applied well enough. I have still not seen signs of PC growth (maybe some GC but not sure) after another three days and the blue is just getting more apparent on the surface.

So my question is this: Should I attempt to scrape away the blue so that some white can start to grow? Is it too late at this point for white and should I just see if I get something like a gorgonzola type cheese from this? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

-Zach

Offline Kern

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Re: Can p. candidum grow if competing against p. roqueforti?
« Reply #1 on: May 30, 2017, 06:23:13 PM »
Your observation agrees with my experience:  That is P. candidum will not grow on P. roqueforti.  I too found this out when making a Cambozola.  The blue contaminated the sides and the white never grew.  I thought of tossing it out but kept it.  It was kinda of crappy tasting during the first couple of months of aging but then got very, very good at around 4 months - a firm rich cheese with a blue flavor.

Offline awakephd

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Re: Can p. candidum grow if competing against p. roqueforti?
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2017, 10:30:30 AM »
Zach, welcome to the forum! As Kern's response shows, this is a great resource - very often someone else has had a similar experience, or at least can offer suggestions, for nearly every question. And we're always happy to celebrate successes and commiserate failures, even more so if we see pictures. :)
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Offline Selenturk

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Re: Can p. candidum grow if competing against p. roqueforti?
« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2017, 11:01:23 PM »
Hello to all. This section of book can help too.
Contamination of Blue cheese by Geotrichum candidum may inhibit growth
and sporulation of P. roqueforti and create areas without veining (`blind spots'),
which affect the quality of the cheese significantly. G. candidum is frequently
found as a contaminant in Blue cheese and it has similar growth behaviour as
P. roqueforti provided salt is absent. G. candidum competes with P. roqueforti
in the interior of the cheese during the initial stage of ripening, before a
sufficient amount of salt has diffused into the core, which inhibits G. candidum
but stimulates P. roqueforti.

Cheese problems solved Book


Offline awakephd

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Re: Can p. candidum grow if competing against p. roqueforti?
« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2017, 09:20:32 AM »
Zach, when I read this thread, I realized I had already welcomed you to the forum here, and just did so again in your thread on shropshire blue. I hope you feel thoroughly welcomed! :)

Selenturk's point is one I had thought about with regard to the shropshire as well - what was your salting regimen for that cheese, or for these?
-- Andy

Offline Al Lewis

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Re: Can p. candidum grow if competing against p. roqueforti?
« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2017, 02:56:50 PM »
Your observation agrees with my experience:  That is P. candidum will not grow on P. roqueforti.  I too found this out when making a Cambozola.  The blue contaminated the sides and the white never grew.  I thought of tossing it out but kept it.  It was kinda of crappy tasting during the first couple of months of aging but then got very, very good at around 4 months - a firm rich cheese with a blue flavor.
That's interesting Kern as mine did the exact opposite. LOL  Tasted the same though.

Making the World a Safer Place, One Cheese at a Time!  http://alewis64.blogspot.com/

Offline ZRedding

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Re: Can p. candidum grow if competing against p. roqueforti?
« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2017, 02:12:24 PM »
Thank you all for your comments.

With one of the two cheeses I decided to follow Kern's advice. I left this cheese alone and the blue is really going mad on it. I will try this one at 3-4 months of age.

For the other cheese, I figured I would experiment with scraping the blue from the outside to see what would happen. I scraped as much of the PR off of the outside of this cheese as I could. I then resprayed with my PC mixture. After about a week of nothing I started to see that marshmellowy carpeting of PC growing! The PC has continued to grow and is nearly covering the outside of this cheese as I write this post. I am now wondering if the blue is already too advanced in its ripening, such that by the time the PC has done its job I might have an overly blue center. We shall see!

Awakephd, as to the salting of this cheese I salted with about 1 tsp for each cheese. One was slightly larger (4.5" diameter vs 4" diameter). The larger got slightly more than 1 tsp and the smaller slightly less. I did not measure these amounts by weight of the cheese unfortunately. The ~1 tsp amount was divided in half for each cheese, with the top and sides salted first and allowed to sit in the mold for about 4 hours before flipping and salting the bottom and the sides again.

Pic #1 is obviously the first cheese that I am letting go blue. The second picture is of the PC just starting to grow on cheese #2

Zach
« Last Edit: June 16, 2017, 02:20:58 PM by ZRedding »