Author Topic: Cracked Blue  (Read 265 times)

Offline Raw Prawn

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: South Australia
  • Posts: 696
  • Cheeses: 102
  • Default personal text
Cracked Blue
« on: September 12, 2017, 10:36:54 PM »
I started work on a rindless blue about two and a half weeks ago. Six days ago I pierced it.
Yesterday I noticed surface cracks appearing. Obviously a humidity issue and I am working on solving that but I needed an urgent solution to the cracking while still allowing the blue mould to develop.
What I have done is to wax the cheese but keep the holes open. I used plugs cut from bamboo skewers to temporarily stop the holes during waxing.
I have not read about this being done but hopefully, it will work. I have bought blue cheese which appeared to have been pierced after waxing. I would be interested to hear if anyone has done anything similar.
- Andrew

Offline awakephd

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: North Carolina
  • Posts: 1,965
  • Cheeses: 194
  • compounding the benefits of a free press
Re: Cracked Blue
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2017, 08:38:58 AM »
Andrew, it shouldn't matter much if you get cracking; just adjust the humidity and continue on. Normally cracking is an invitation for blue mold to get into the rind ... but that's kinda what you're after here. :) The blue will eventually cover the outside anyway.

That said - it will be interesting to see what happens with your unique approach. Perhaps this will produce a rindless blue ... ?
-- Andy

Offline Raw Prawn

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: South Australia
  • Posts: 696
  • Cheeses: 102
  • Default personal text
Re: Cracked Blue
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2018, 10:17:38 PM »
Where this one went next:
  • Two weeks after the last post, I pierced the holes again
  • After another month and after testing with a trier, I waxed again to close the holes.
  • A few weeks later it became apparent that the larger cheese had whey collecting under the wax, despite the length of time since I started it. I removed the wax and wrapped the cheese in foil.
  • About a week later I did the same with the smaller cheese.
  • Opened the large cheese just before Christmas and the smaller one today.
The experiment with the waxing was not particularly successful but, despite that, both cheeses turned out very nicely. They are a somewhat crumbly but still quite creamy, if that makes sense. Both have a nice, moderately strong, blue taste,
- Andrew

Offline AnnDee

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Indonesia
  • Posts: 647
  • Cheeses: 94
  • Default personal text
Re: Cracked Blue
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2018, 09:15:05 AM »
That looks delish! AC4U!
Ann

Offline Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,936
  • Cheeses: 327
  • Contemplating cheese
Re: Cracked Blue
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2018, 12:06:18 PM »
Wow, talk about a labor-intensive cheese!  Fascinating experiment, Andrew. That deserves a cheese for being out on the cheese frontier. ;)

For the most part, Fourme d'Ambert is a clean rind blue because it is brined. There may be a little blue growth on the rind, but the high salt level helps keep it at bay.

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.

Offline GortKlaatu

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Orosi Valley, Costa Rica
  • Posts: 277
  • Cheeses: 29
  • Goat milk?
Re: Cracked Blue
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2018, 07:14:49 PM »
AC4U for a cool looking cheese and for your ingenuity.

Somewhere, some long time ago, milk decided to reach toward immortality… and to call itself cheese.

Offline Raw Prawn

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: South Australia
  • Posts: 696
  • Cheeses: 102
  • Default personal text
Re: Cracked Blue
« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2018, 09:27:41 PM »
Thanks to all for the cheeses.
Boofer, thanks for the information on Fourme d'Ambert. That is useful to know.
I think this is one that I will be doing again.
- Andrew