Author Topic: Unhomogenized Milk Separated Making Wensleydale  (Read 175 times)

Offline KatieG

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Unhomogenized Milk Separated Making Wensleydale
« on: October 22, 2017, 05:52:29 PM »
I tried making Wensleydale using a  high quality unhomogenized milk. This was my first time using this type of milk as I usually use homogenized. The milk began forming clumps of butter during the ripening stage at 86 degrees and I could not stir them back in. I don't know what went wrong. Now I'm afraid to try unhomogenized milk again. Any help would be appreciated.

Offline awakephd

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Re: Unhomogenized Milk Separated Making Wensleydale
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2017, 09:22:06 AM »
Katie, welcome to the forum! I have only had the pleasure of using unhomogenized milk once, and didn't have that problem, so I will not be much help - the only thing I wonder about is if you are literally getting butter, you may be stirring too vigorously - ?? But others here regularly use raw and/or LTP non-homogenized milk, so I am sure they will be able to chime in.
-- Andy

Offline Boofer

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Re: Unhomogenized Milk Separated Making Wensleydale
« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2017, 11:02:41 AM »
Welcome to the forum, Katie.

You can use the search function to find that this has been discussed previously.

I've had the bits of butterfat floating in my milk many times. If the milk is very fresh this is not normally a problem as the butterfat is still natively incorporated with the milk. As it sits in the refrigerated shelf, the cream rises and hardens. If I buy whole creamline milk on the day that it's delivered to the store, the milk is completely fluid. If I happen to buy milk several days later, the cream has formed a plug at the top of the glass half gallon bottle. The bottle cap says to shake vigorously. I can more or less reincorporate the cream making up that plug back into the milk. In those instances there may be more tendency for the blobs to appear. I skim the bits and dump them down the drain or spread them on my toast. There is typically plenty of rich cream still inside the milk which translates into wonderful cheese. Yum! :P  8)

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Offline KatieG

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Re: Unhomogenized Milk Separated Making Wensleydale
« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2017, 01:53:17 PM »
Thank you for the welcome and the help. The link was very useful as my searching the site didn't turn up anything. The milk did have a solid cream plug that seemed to be incorporated into the milk at first. The yellow butter "blobs" began appearing on the surface after the ripening step. The amount of butter looked like about 1/4 of a cup at the end. I went ahead with the recipe so I guess I'll see how it turned out in three months. Thanks again.

Offline Boofer

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Re: Unhomogenized Milk Separated Making Wensleydale
« Reply #4 on: October 23, 2017, 10:24:34 PM »
I'll be watching and waiting to see how this turns out.

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