Author Topic: First hard cheese - cheddar question  (Read 2923 times)

Offline Wayne Harris

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Re: First hard cheese - cheddar question
« Reply #15 on: August 05, 2009, 06:38:48 PM »
The thought on the amount of curd was the "sponginess" of the curd.  The more curd the more resistance to a fixed PSI.

So, for example.  Take an 8" mould that is 1" deep in curd and an 8" mould that is 60" inches deep in curd. (a bit rediculous, I know)  In order to properly press the center of the longer cheese mould, would you still use the same PSI?   It seems to me that the deeper cheddar might push back a bit more (and thus need more PSI) than the 1" deep mould. 

Its a bit academic, in that i will never do this,  its just a thought experiment.
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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: First hard cheese - cheddar question
« Reply #16 on: August 05, 2009, 06:48:44 PM »
You may have a point there about the amount of cheese. That may be a reflection of the curd depth.  We  discussed PSI requirements for cheddar moulds that are deep vs those that are not so deep in threads prior.  I think previous threads will reflect that there was a conclusion that the deeper the mould, (the more cheese) the more PSI might be required.   But it was a conclusion reached before some of the pros arrived on scene. (hint, hint :) )   I would search the forum for those threads but dinner is almost up here........  (And feeling a bit lazy)

So, of the cheeses you press lightly for a long time, what does your curd look like? is it open at all?  I have posted pics of my cheddar, all still a bit open.

The commercial cheddar producers do use high pressure, but they also use a vacuum to help achieve that completely closed curd.

I have posted several pictures let me see what I can find ...

Here''s a few I could find sliced my asiago, Monterey Jack and pepperoni and  edam

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: First hard cheese - cheddar question
« Reply #17 on: August 05, 2009, 06:54:08 PM »
The thought on the amount of curd was the "sponginess" of the curd.  The more curd the more resistance to a fixed PSI.

So, for example.  Take an 8" mould that is 1" deep in curd and an 8" mould that is 60" inches deep in curd. (a bit rediculous, I know)  In order to properly press the center of the longer cheese mould, would you still use the same PSI?   It seems to me that the deeper cheddar might push back a bit more (and thus need more PSI) than the 1" deep mould. 

Its a bit academic, in that i will never do this,  its just a thought experiment.


I use progressively larger weights for larger molds but not really huge weights. For example the 450 kg molds I use a can of pinapple (12 oz?). The 1 kg mold I #10 can of beans (6.5 lbs).The 3 kg mold I used 2 #10 can one bean one tomatoe (about 12 lbs). The long Asiago I pressed with 1 #10 tomato and one spaghetti sauce because I neededd something to fit inside the tube (about 8 lbs).

BUT I press for at least 12 hours.

Offline FRANCOIS

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Re: First hard cheese - cheddar question
« Reply #18 on: August 05, 2009, 06:59:45 PM »
Just spoke with one of the cheese makers.  I stand very corrected.  At the big automated cheddar plants we press the 20kg blocks for 5 min then vacuum seal, the vacuum is required for closed knitting.  The longer press times plus the pre-press at our plant are why we don't need the vacuum. 

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: First hard cheese - cheddar question
« Reply #19 on: August 05, 2009, 07:04:45 PM »
The longer press times plus the pre-press at our plant are why we don't need the vacuum.

Thanks Francois I think you've just proved my theory. A lighter initial weight allows the whey and the air to be expelled. Once that had happened a larger weight can be used to complete the pressing.


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