Author Topic: San Miguel  (Read 447 times)

Offline GortKlaatu

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San Miguel
« on: November 27, 2017, 01:05:11 PM »
This is a light brine washed curd raw goat milk cheese that I "invented."
I was hoping to age it 4 months and have it for Christmas, but I just couldn't wait, so we broke it open today, at just over 3 months.
We feel like it is a huge success.  Will definitely add this to my ongoing list of "don't change it" recipes.


Obviously it has a natural rind, developed from the "native" bacteria and yeasts colonized in the cave.
It has an earthy and slightly musty (in a good way, like your favorite old book) smell.
The paste is pliable and has an initial sweetness that gives way to definite mushroomy flavors that become more complex as it warms on the tongue.


Very happy.  I call it San Miguel.
Somewhere, some long time ago, milk decided to reach toward immortality… and to call itself cheese.

Offline GortKlaatu

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Re: San Miguel
« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2017, 01:10:11 PM »
Oops....I guess I should have posted this in the Washed Curd section.  I don't know how to move it there. 

Somewhere, some long time ago, milk decided to reach toward immortality… and to call itself cheese.

Offline awakephd

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Re: San Miguel
« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2017, 09:06:42 AM »
Looks good! Wish I could taste it ... I'd give you a cheese, but I just gave you one on another thread, and the software won't let you give more than one cheese per hour to any one person. :(
-- Andy

Offline GortKlaatu

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Re: San Miguel
« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2017, 12:00:42 PM »
Hola Andy


This is the first post I've seen today, so I haven't seen your other cheese yet, but I'll say thanks both both.  It's the thought that counts.
If you're ever visiting Costa Rica, you're welcome to come by for a visit and a tasting.
Somewhere, some long time ago, milk decided to reach toward immortality… and to call itself cheese.

Offline awakephd

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Re: San Miguel
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2017, 08:35:21 AM »
Just might get the chance, one of these days ... :)
-- Andy

Offline Boofer

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Re: San Miguel
« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2017, 10:00:59 PM »
Oops....I guess I should have posted this in the Washed Curd section.  I don't know how to move it there.
Looks great, Gort! Have a cheese.

You can PM the Webmaster with your request.

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.

Offline GortKlaatu

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Re: San Miguel
« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2017, 07:51:25 AM »
Thanks Boofer.

Somewhere, some long time ago, milk decided to reach toward immortality… and to call itself cheese.

Offline AnnDee

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Re: San Miguel
« Reply #7 on: November 30, 2017, 09:50:59 PM »
Love the look of this cheese, Gort. AC4U
Ann

Offline GortKlaatu

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Re: San Miguel
« Reply #8 on: November 30, 2017, 09:52:28 PM »
Thanks AnnDee
Somewhere, some long time ago, milk decided to reach toward immortality… and to call itself cheese.

Offline waltweissman

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Re: San Miguel
« Reply #9 on: December 01, 2017, 09:56:44 AM »
This is a light brine washed curd raw goat milk cheese that I "invented."
Will definitely add this to my ongoing list of "don't change it" recipes.

Very happy.  I call it San Miguel.

Stunning cheese GortKlaatu.  Would you consider sharing the recipe for "San Miguel"?  And by a bit more detail conserning "light brine wash"?

Great job...

Offline GortKlaatu

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Re: San Miguel
« Reply #10 on: December 01, 2017, 06:18:56 PM »
Thanks Walt!
And sure thing....more than happy to tell you my make:


San Miguel Cheese


5 gallons of raw goat milk (I use LaMancha) *See below
1/4 tsp Flora Danica
(Because my cave has a well-established flora of bacteria/yeast/mold, I didn't add any adjuncts.)

Heat milk to 76 F
Add culture, wait 5 min and then mix well.
Increase temp to 86 F
Hold and ripen till pH drop of 0.05. (This took one hour)
Add 1/4 tsp rennet
Goal time is 45 min. Use Floc factor of 3.5  (My actual time was 40 min)
Cut curds to 1/4" over a 20 min period. (I cut to 1/2" then waited 10 min and then slowly cut to final 1/4" size)
Rest 15 min
While resting heat 2 1/2 gallon of water to 86 F and add 1 Tablespoon of salt to it.
After rest, Remove 2 1/2 gallon of whey
Replace with the 2 1/2 gallon of lightly salted 86F water.
Raise temp to  97 F over 30 min period (Basically 1 degree every 3 minutes or so)
Gather curd  together and press lightly under whey  x 10 min
Pour off whey
Put into cloth lined mold (I used an 8"x6" mold)
Press 15 min with weight equal to curd (about 5 lbs)
Turn and press 30 min with same weight
Turn and press 1 hour at double curd weight (about 10 lbs)
At the next turn and press you can add weight if rind is not well closed...my was)
Turn and press until pH of curd is at 5.3 (This took about 6 hours-- pH was 5.47 at 5 hours and at 6 hours it was 5.28)
Use saturated brine and brine 2 1/2 hours per pound
Air dry (My ambient temp is about 74 with about 60-70% humidity during the day)
Place in cave at 55 F and 85% humidity
Allow natural rind to develop. (I really only brush it if there seems to be some blue mold incursion or the molds are just getting way out of control)
Flip daily for two weeks.  Then twice weekly times 2 weeks.  Then once every 5 days or so.
Age for 2-3 months.


*My recommendations for other milk
If you are using pasteurized milk I would double the amount of culture and rennet (I use 50% of culture amount recommended in recipes with pasteurized milk  and I use only 40% of the rennet recommended--otherwise my floc/coag times are WAY to fast)
Also if you are using cow milk I would increase all temps by 3 degrees


There you go.  I hope that all makes sense.
Please let me know if you make one and tell how it goes and what you think of it.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2018, 11:44:41 AM by GortKlaatu »
Somewhere, some long time ago, milk decided to reach toward immortality… and to call itself cheese.

Offline waltweissman

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Re: San Miguel
« Reply #11 on: December 01, 2017, 07:39:50 PM »
Fantastic.  When I get to this I will keep you posted. 

All the best,

Walt

Offline waltweissman

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Re: San Miguel
« Reply #12 on: January 10, 2018, 01:37:26 PM »
Hi GortKlaatu,

I look forward to making San Miguel in March  ( I have a lot of traveling to do between now and then).  In the meantime, I have one question: you state "While resting heat 2 1/2 gallon of water to 86 F and add 1 Tablespoon of salt to it."  Is that the brine for after pressing?  It seems light on salt, or am I (as usual) confused?

Best,

walt 

Offline GortKlaatu

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Re: San Miguel
« Reply #13 on: January 10, 2018, 06:47:52 PM »
No, this is a washed curd cheese, but it uses a very light brine for the washing instead of plain water.  Then you press it.
Then after pressing you a regular saturated brine for the brining at 2 1/2 hours per pound
Does that make sense.
I'm super excited you want to make it and I'm really curious to see how it will turn out for you.
Somewhere, some long time ago, milk decided to reach toward immortality… and to call itself cheese.

Offline Scarlettbri12

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Re: San Miguel
« Reply #14 on: January 10, 2018, 11:24:42 PM »
Hi Gortklaatu,

What's the theory behind using a light brine for washing instead of regular water? I've seen the addition of salt in some washed curd recipes and wanted to know what difference it makes/why it's done, but couldn't find the answer.

Amazing looking cheese btw! Wish I could try it :)