Author Topic: Crottin (de Chavignol) clone  (Read 208 times)

Offline Scarlettbri12

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Crottin (de Chavignol) clone
« on: November 27, 2017, 08:28:47 PM »
Hi all!

I decided to try my hand at a crottin recipe, and to put it mildly I'm very pleased by the results! It is my first bloomy rind style, and it will definitely stick around. I've already eaten 3/4 of the cheeses from the make  :o

I followed the recipe from https://www.cheesemaking.com/Crottin.html using pastuerized goats milk. I was a little worried about not having pH markers and "using my intuition" as some steps advised, but it turned out great anyways! Makes me realize maaaaybe I shouldn't try to control every little detail of the makes and just let the little guys do their job :)

I will say, seeing the rind scrunch and wrinkle up day by day really was my favorite part!

Offline GortKlaatu

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Re: Crottin (de Chavignol) clone
« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2017, 09:14:13 PM »
Congrats!  AC4U

Somewhere, some long time ago, milk decided to reach toward immortality… and to call itself cheese.

Offline awakephd

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Re: Crottin (de Chavignol) clone
« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2017, 08:59:46 AM »
Well done - AC4U!

I've found with the bloomy cheeses that I don't need to worry about the pH markers - I figure the curds are going to bottom out on pH during the lengthy draining time anyway. That said, the one marker that might be worth checking is the pH at draining - this can affect the final structure of the cheese, based on how much calcium is drained away.
-- Andy

Offline Scarlettbri12

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Re: Crottin (de Chavignol) clone
« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2017, 02:25:44 PM »
Gort and Andy, thank you! :)

Andy,
What ph would I be looking for at that point? I did try to take some readings for future reference, but don't know an actual point it should be at. These ended up being very smooth, creamy, silky, and dense (almost like cream cheese but not AS dense), and the yield they returned was amazing. For reference, I used 4 molds filled to the top from 1 gallon, vs when I went to make a stabilized paste brie with 1 gallon, I only got a yield of 2 (of the same type of molds).

I'd like to learn your insights on affecting the texture with pH if possible :)

Online Tim Sumrall

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Re: Crottin (de Chavignol) clone
« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2017, 04:45:03 PM »
Don't know this cheese but Wow it looks amazing! AC4U

Offline awakephd

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Re: Crottin (de Chavignol) clone
« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2017, 08:34:14 AM »
Gort and Andy, thank you! :)

Andy,
What ph would I be looking for at that point? I did try to take some readings for future reference, but don't know an actual point it should be at. These ended up being very smooth, creamy, silky, and dense (almost like cream cheese but not AS dense), and the yield they returned was amazing. For reference, I used 4 molds filled to the top from 1 gallon, vs when I went to make a stabilized paste brie with 1 gallon, I only got a yield of 2 (of the same type of molds).

I'd like to learn your insights on affecting the texture with pH if possible :)

Hopefully one of the experts on here will chime in ... my sense is that you are looking for a lower pH at draining than you would for a typical hard or semi-hard cheese - but that said, I don't know off the top of my head how low. I'll have to look at my Caldwell book to see if she gives a pH recommendation.
-- Andy

Offline GortKlaatu

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Re: Crottin (de Chavignol) clone
« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2017, 06:01:13 PM »
I'm not an expert, but I'll chime in.


I've found that the texture is also affected by the temperature of the milk during ripening.
For example, with any of my lactic set or semi-lactic set goat cheeses, there is a definite finer texture and creamier mouth-feel if I use a temp of 72 degrees instead of 86-88 F. It does take a bit longer to set but the acid production is slower and with it the resultant curd formation is better. But at the faster time with a higher temp the final texture is definitely coarser.



Somewhere, some long time ago, milk decided to reach toward immortality… and to call itself cheese.

Offline Gregore

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Re: Crottin (de Chavignol) clone
« Reply #7 on: November 29, 2017, 10:51:37 PM »
Lactic set should be left long enough to hit below 4.6 , before it is moved to be drained . That is pretty close to as low as it will go which is about 4.2   .  The whole idea is to not cut the curd until after the acid curve is over .

Those crottin look very good by the way