Author Topic: Dry cheese question  (Read 1927 times)

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Dry cheese question
« Reply #15 on: July 18, 2009, 12:45:39 PM »
Our kids were raise with the concept of computing when everything was already understood where for us it was something strange and new  and nobody really knew what they would be able to do until you wrote the code. We also learned on computers with pixels the size of golf balls and limited programing languages. We learned as the rest of the world learned what these fanstinanting machines could do.

Now everyones an expert! They even have books for dummies!


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Offline linuxboy

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Re: Dry cheese question
« Reply #16 on: August 06, 2009, 01:29:12 PM »
I don't now about the rest of you, but I am continually impressed with Linux-boys knowlege.

Linuxboy, What cheese books do you read?


Thanks for all the kind words, everyone. I'm here to try and learn, like everyone else :)

Here's a short list of books or references I like:

Cheese and fermented milk foods by Frank Kosikowski
American farmstead cheese by Paul Kindstedt
Cheesemaking Practice by Andrew Wilbey et al
Applied Dairy Microbiology, by Elmer H. Marth
Advanced Dairy Chemistry: by Paul L.H. McSweeney, et al
Fundamentals of Cheese Science, by Fox, McSweeny, et al
The Dairy Processing Handbook that TetraPak produces


I've recently read Cheese Rheology and Texture, written by an Indian fellow and Cheese Problems Solved, edited by McSweeney.

Most of those get pretty far into geek territory. If you're looking for something more helpful to the everyday, check out The Fabrication of Farmstead Goat Cheese by Jean-Claude Le Jaouen. Also Margaret Morris wrote The Cheesemaker's Manual and it's very good. I also like Peter Dixon's annual journal, which you can get here: http://www.dairyfoodsconsulting.com/publications.shtml

Creamline often has good articles, too. Oh and there's a new book out that I like written by Debra Amrein-Boyes: 200 Easy Homemade Cheese Recipes.

I read a lot  :P
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.

Offline pam

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Re: Dry cheese question
« Reply #17 on: August 06, 2009, 03:10:36 PM »
And, you retain what you read; even better!
Be content with what you have - Rejoice in the way things are - When you realize there is nothing lacking - The whole world belongs to you
- Lao Tse

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Dry cheese question
« Reply #18 on: August 06, 2009, 04:47:27 PM »
I highly recommend Margaret Morris's book for begining or advanced cheese makers that like plain simple language. She's a really nice lady too. She even signed my copy for me. If you buy it from her website it's cheaper than most places I have found.

http://glengarrycheesemaking.on.ca/kitvideo.htm

My only complaint is there is no index in the back but it is clear and easy to understand.

I also really enjoyed:

American farmstead cheese by Paul Kindstedt it made a lot of things I saw while making cheese blindly over the years very clear. A bit more technical but not to bad. You can always skip the sections on starting a business.

I also purchased - 200 Easy Homemade Cheese Recipes by Debra Amrein-Boyes a few months ago based on a recommendation on the Danlac website. I am trying her Munster recipe now. We shall see. Pretty good book. IMHO it's much better than Ricki Carrol's book for beginers or advanced cheesemakers. I have compared it to about 120 of my own recipes and so far I have found no errors other than my own.