Author Topic: Havarti Cheese Making: Five Recipes Compared  (Read 6039 times)

Offline John (CH)

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Havarti Cheese Making: Five Recipes Compared
« on: August 21, 2009, 01:11:17 PM »
Below compilation updated with three additional Havarti Making Recipes supplied by member DeejayDebi (many thanks).

I've never made Havarti but after last weekend's two washed curd Gouda's I want to try a different washed curd cheese as they don't need high pressing weights and are relatively short aging time.

To help understand the method I've summarized five surprisingly quite different Havarti recipes by each step, hoping it will invite discussion of others experiences and recommendations, and other Havarti recipes, and thereby enable me to go work quicker up the learning curve (my comments in brackets):

GENERAL
Peter Dixon:
  • Interior of Havarti typically has many mechanical openings and a soft creamy texture.
Debra 200:
  • Popular Danish originated cheese with a mild taste and flexible texture.
Danlac:
  • Makes ~2.5 kg (~5.5 lb) block/loaf.

STEP #1: MILK PREPARATION
Peter Dixon:
  • Warm milk and hold at 86-88°F (30.0-31.0C).
Debra 200:
  • Warm 4 gallons/16 liters milk and hold at 90F/32C (not sure if US or Canadian gallons).
Margaret Morris:
  • Warm 12-15 liters/3-4 gallons milk and hold at 32°C (90°F), stirring occasionally.
Danlac:
  • Using raw milk, standardize to 2.9-3.5% fat, depending on the protein content. Then pasteurize by heating to 72-75C (161-167F) for 16-30 seconds or 145F for 30 minutes, cool to rennet temperature of 30-32C (86-90F).
Member Debi:
  • Warm 7 US gallons Pasteurized cow's milk and hold at 86-88°F (30.0-31.0C).

STEP #2: STARTER CULTURE
Peter Dixon:
  • 0.25-0.5% Rosell Aroma B bulk starter or Danisco DVS Choozit MM100 or MM101 or BT002 @ 1 unit per 50-100 lb. milk.
Debra 200:
  • Sprinkle ½ tsp/2.5 ml mesophilic starter (no type recommended) per 4 US gallons milk over milk, let stand 5 min, stir in. Add CaCl2.
Margaret Morris:
  • Abiasa's Meso III or Meso II and Aroma B, let dissolve on milk surface for 2-4 minutes then work well into milk with 20 top-bottom strokes.
Danlac:
  • Inoculate milk with 0.7-1% Wisby Probat 505 bulk starter or Probat 222 direct set at 5u/500 liter. (Note cheese culture manufacturer Wisby acquired by Danisco in 1998). Add 20 gr/100 liter of CaCl2.
Member Debi:
  • Sprinkle ½ tsp (2.5 ml) mesophilic Aromatic Type B starter & ½ tsp (2.5 ml) MD-89 to enhance buttery flavor and produce some small eye in cheese, let stand 5 min, stir in.

STEP #3: RIPENING
Peter Dixon:
  • Set aside for 30 minutes.
Debra 200:
  • No ripen time given (assume go direct to renneting).
Margaret Morris:
  • Set aside for 30 minutes, if required, add CaCl2.
Danlac:
  • Pre-ripen to pH of 6.50.
Member Debi:
  • Set aside for 30 minutes, then add CaCl2 if want.

STEP #4: RENNETING
Your choice and amount.
Danlac:
  • Coagulation setting time 15-18 min, coagulation time 30-40 minutes.

STEP #5: CUTTING CURD
Peter Dixon:
  • After 40 min check for Clean Break & cut into 0.375 in (3/8”)/9.5 mm cubes after 3 x the curdling time.
Debra 200:
  • After 45 min check for clean break, if not wait, otherwise cut into 12.5 mm/0.5 in cubes.
Margaret Morris:
  • Check for clean break, if not wait, otherwise cut into 12.5 mm/0.5 in cubes.
Danlac:
  • Cut to green pea to hazelnut size (0.5-1 cm3).
Member Debi:
  • Check for clean break, if not wait, otherwise cut into 12.5 mm/0.5 in cubes.

STEP #6: COOKING CUT CURD
Peter Dixon:
  • Heal curds for 5 min then gently stir curds in whey for 15 minutes.
Debra 200:
  • Stir gently for 10 min, let curds settle.
Margaret Morris:
  • Stir gently for 5-10 min until they are uniform size and to prevent matting, let curds settle to bottom for 5 minutes.
Danlac:
  • Set cut curds for 5-10 minutes, then stir 20-30 minutes.
Member Debi:
  • Set cut curds for 5 minutes, then gently stir 15 minutes.

STEP #7: WASHING CURDS
Peter Dixon:
  • Let curds settle to the bottom, drain off whey equal to 1/3 to 1/2 of original milk volume.
  • While stirring curds continuously, add enough 130F (54.4C) water to raise the temp to 93F (34.0C), then stir for another 5 min.
  • Add additional 130F (54.4C) water to fully replace the removed whey and raising the temp to hit final target 97-98F (36.1-36.7C), depending on the cheese moisture content desired.
  • Add 90 grams salt per 100 lb original milk weight.
  • Stir and cook for 30 min 97-98F (36.1-36.7C).
  • Let curds settle to the bottom of vat for 5 min.
Debra 200:
  • Remove whey equal to 31% of original milk volume until you can see surface of the curds, add same amount of 170F/77C water to bring to target 100F/38C. Add more hot or cold to reach target temp.
  • Add 1/3 cup/75 ml pickling or canning salt. Stir thoroughly.
  • Hold for 30 min at 100F/38C, stirring every few min to avoid matting.
  • Let curds stand/settle.
Margaret Morris:
  • Remove about 4 liters/1 gallon whey, replace immediately with 2 liters (0.5 gallon) very hot water @ 75-80C/167-176F to bring to target 38C/100F. Stir gently to even out temp, add little hot or cold water to adjust to target temperature.
  • Add 1/4 cup coarse salt. stir thoroughly.
  • Hold for 30 min at target 100F/38C, stirring every few min to avoid matting. Use texture test in other chapter to see if curds are ready to be drained
Danlac:
  • Remove about 30-40% total volume of whey, stir 10-15 minutes, scald/cook curds by adding 15 +/- 3% hot water to reach target 38C/100F within 15-25 minutes.
  • Add 100-200 grams salt per 100 liters milk if dry salting, not if brining.
  • Stir for 40-45 minutes.
Member Debi:
  • Let curds settle and push to one side and drain whey equal to 1/2 original milk volume, (save whey for brine), add same amount of 170F (77C) water while continuously stirring to bring to target 97-98F (36-37C). Add more hot or cold to reach target temp.
  • Add 1/4 cup salt.
  • Stir and cook for 30 min at target 97-98F 36-37C).
  • Let curds stand/settle.

STEP #8: PRESSING
Peter Dixon:
  • Push and draw the curds towards the back of the vat to form the desired depth of the curd pack.
  • Drain/remove whey/water until the curd pack is covered by 2“ whey.
  • Stir the curds vigorously in the whey.
  • Drain off the remaining water/whey and continue stirring and breaking up Curds while placing into cheese hoop/mold.
  • Press with 1.5 pound (0.7 kg) weight per 1 pound (0.45 kg) of cheese.
  • Remove cheeses from press, turn, replace and press again. Repeat 2 more times every 15 min.
  • Repeat 3 more times every hour (looks like 3:45 hours total, no detail on what weight).
Debra 200:
  • Pour contents through a cloth lined colander. Break up curds slightly to release as much whey as possible.
  • Place curd in mold making sure no empty spaces between the curds.
  • Press lightly for 20 min.
  • Turn and press at medium for 6-8 hours.
Margaret Morris:
  • Drain curds in colander pre-warmed with very hot water.
  • Press as per other chapter for 4-6 hours.
Danlac:
  • Place curds in forms (hoops).
  • Press depending on equipment, ie 15 min at 0.3-0.6 bar (4.4-8.8 psi, 30.4-60.8 kPa) and turn until pH at 5.3 +/- 0.15.
Member Debi:
  • Push curds to side of vat to form a curd pack.
  • Place mold in whey, drain of whey, break up curds, add optional 2 tablespoons dill weed and mix well, put curds in hoops.
  • Press at 1.5 pounds per pound of cheese for 15 minutes.
  • Turn, and press at same weight for 30 minutes, repeat.
  • Turn, and press at same weight for 60 minutes, repeat twice.

STEP #9: SALTING
Peter Dixon:
  • Place in a saturated brine 2.5 hours per lb. (0.45 kg) of cheese depending on desired salt content. Alternatively, rub cheese wheels with coarse flake dry salt once per day for each 4 lb (1.8 kg) of cheese.
Debra 200:
  • No salting/brining listed.
Margaret Morris:
  • Brine cheese in heavy brine 32 oz salt per 1 Cdn(UK) gallon for 3-4 hours.
Danlac:
  • Brine cheese in 5.2 +/- 0.1 pH brine, time depending on cheese weight. Cheese pH after bath should be 5.10-5.15.
Member Debi:
  • Prepare saturated brine by mixing 4 tablespoons salt per one US gallon whey, adjust pH to 5.8-6.0. Brine cheese for 2.5 hours per lb of cheese. Brine pH after cheese's bath should be ~5.2.

STEP #10: AGING
Peter Dixon:
  • Air dry cheese @ 80-85% RH and 50-60F (10.0-15.6C) until the surfaces are dry but not cracked; (rinds that are cracked will allow molds to penetrate the cheese).
  • As soon as surfaces are dry, wax or vacuum seal.
  • Store at 50-55F (10.0-12.8C) and 85-90% RH for at least 30 days.
  • Cheeses in wax will last 6 months.
  • Higher temp during drying and aging, the greater chance the eye development.
Debra 200:
  • Remove from hoop and cheesecloth, place on mat in ripening container at 54F/12C and 90% humidity for 4 weeks. Turn daily for 1 week, remove any whey in bottom of ripening container. After 1 week turn every 2nd day.
  • After 4 weeks, coat with wax and store in fridge (presumably household cold fridge) or continue ripening to taste.
Margaret Morris:
  • Air dry at room temperature, cream and hard wax cheese.
  • Age 6-8 weeks in cheese cave if using pasteurized milk, longer if raw milk.
Danlac:
  • Smear cheese rind by dipping or smearing with red smear solution (liquid B linens culture in 5 volumes of 3% NaCl salt. Repeat twice.
  • Ripen for 2 weeks at 15 +/- 3C & 95-100% humidity. Smear cheese twice per week until a nice closed but not too thick layer or red smear has developed.
  • Next 2-6 weeks age at 12-14C & 85-90% humidity.
  • Package and store at 6C, mild >5 weeks, medium >3 months, sharp >6 months.
Member Debi:
  • Air dry until surface is dry to touch.
  • Age a 50F and 80-85% humidity Cheese can be waxed or vacuum sealed as soon as surfaces are dry enough.
  • Store wheels at 50-55F and 85-90% humidity for 30-120 days.
  • If not waxed or vacuum sealed, wash rind every other day with mix of 2 cups salt, 2 tablespoons vinegar and 1 teaspoon CaCl2 per 1/2 US gallon.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2009, 09:11:26 AM by John (CH) »


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Offline John (CH)

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Re: Havarti Cheese Making: Five Recipes Compared
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2009, 01:20:58 PM »
The above two recipes are the only Havarti ones I can find and they are very different:
  • Ripening Time: 30 min by Peter, none by Debra.
  • Washing Curds: Two stage by Peter, one stage by Debra.
  • Pressing: Short by Peter and no weight details, medium time by Debra.
  • Brining: Yes by Peter, none by Debra.
  • Aging: Wax or vacuum seal by Peter, wax only by Debra.

Also, no pre-pressing in whey stage like with Gouda.

Also also, I built a Havarti Cheese info Webpage a year ago with pictures of several manufactured Havarti's including flavoured ones:
  • Sundried Tomatoe
  • Dill
  • Jalapeno Chili
  • Caraway Seed
  • Herbs & Spices
« Last Edit: August 21, 2009, 07:22:02 PM by John (CH) »

Offline John (CH)

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Re: Havarti Cheese Making: Five Recipes Compared
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2009, 08:37:14 AM »
To OP (Original Post), added three more Havarti Cheese making recipes supplied by member Debi.

In summary, washing and pressing time and methods vary, brine concentrations vary and Debi uses her whey rather than water as base, aging methods are wax coating, vacuum bagging, and natural rind.

All these will result in slightly different Havartis!

Offline Zoey

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Re: Havarti Cheese Making: Five Recipes Compared
« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2009, 05:11:12 AM »

Hmm, I wonder what the default milk fat percentage is, since not many mention any. In Finland they sell milk with 0 - 3,5% fat, so according to Danlac I could use 3,5%? Any ideas?

Anyhow, thanks John, I'm pretty sure I will follow some of these directions while making my first havarti (hopefully this evening).

Going to use my typical 10 liter batch (largest pan I have) with store-bought buttermilk culture.

I was already wondering elsewhere, what might be the difference between "Cream Havarti" and just "Havarti". I did some research on the final products' fat content, and didn't see much difference, so I'm assuming it's just a quality/flavor/texture thing. Well anyway, while I'm seeking the "Cream" quality, it somehow feels right to use the 3,5% fat milk (I know it's not whole, but it's the closest I can get with store-bought).

I'm wondering whether to use the b.linens smear ripening process or one of the others. Debra's version seems the simplest, since I wouldn't need the b.linens, wax or vacuum. But doesn't the cheese grow mold in that scenario? I've never been able to hold a moist uncovered cheese mold-free, and I'm doubting I would get the temperature and moisture levels stable enough to ensure that. (since I don't own any equipment)

I've read from here that many people get mold-under-wax. That doesn't sound appealing either, and I've never waxed anything (but have a wax-supply on my way from work so could try it).

How about the b.linens then? How dependent are those of the exact right ripening conditions?


Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Havarti Cheese Making: Five Recipes Compared
« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2009, 10:44:49 PM »
You could just suck the air out of a plastic bag and twist it tightly and tie it off. That might last a little while. Havarti dries out quickly. If you want it creamy you could 1) add a portion of cream say 1/2 liter of your 10 liter batch or try sealing it in a bag within a few days of drying.



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Offline Zoey

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Re: Havarti Cheese Making: Five Recipes Compared
« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2009, 01:07:33 AM »

Hmm, thanks Debi,
I might try that bag thing.

I just found out a fantastic thing; my fridge seems to have a fruit department that is around 12-13 degrees celsius. Whoa, I'm lucky. I never even thought of measuring the temp since the fridge has a digital thermometer which is at 7C. Well, it seems that's just the truth for some of the space (probably what's near the cooler thingies).

Since I don't want to hi-jack John's excellent post, I'll probably be posting about my havarti in a separate one soon.

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Re: Havarti Cheese Making: Five Recipes Compared
« Reply #6 on: September 03, 2009, 12:38:40 PM »
I have the Peter Dixon version in a mold now. Will dry salt and vacuum pack.
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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Havarti Cheese Making: Five Recipes Compared
« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2009, 05:57:29 PM »

Hmm, thanks Debi,
I might try that bag thing.

I just found out a fantastic thing; my fridge seems to have a fruit department that is around 12-13 degrees celsius. Whoa, I'm lucky. I never even thought of measuring the temp since the fridge has a digital thermometer which is at 7C. Well, it seems that's just the truth for some of the space (probably what's near the cooler thingies).

Mine has a "cheese drawer" basically keeps it at 45 degrees but very short and always full!

Offline jkatz1

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Re: Havarti Cheese Making: Five Recipes Compared
« Reply #8 on: July 30, 2010, 01:01:30 PM »
What is the purpose of the calcium chloride in the natural rind washing solution? I made two wheels of havarti, which are aging in the fridge, and we are debating about how to age them. We don't have any wax or vacuum sealing, so we'd like to do a natural rind, but are skeptical about the washing solution described here. Any thoughts on the topic?

Offline Mr. Kim

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Re: Havarti Cheese Making: Five Recipes Compared
« Reply #9 on: July 30, 2010, 01:33:55 PM »
The CaCl2 in the brine solution keeps the brine from leaching the calcium from the cheese.  I often do my brineing in the whey to keep this from happening. 
Something about the feel of a Strat in my hands!


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Offline Alex

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Re: Havarti Cheese Making: Five Recipes Compared
« Reply #10 on: July 31, 2010, 09:32:45 AM »
What is the purpose of the calcium chloride in the natural rind washing solution? I made two wheels of havarti, which are aging in the fridge, and we are debating about how to age them. We don't have any wax or vacuum sealing, so we'd like to do a natural rind, but are skeptical about the washing solution described here. Any thoughts on the topic?

There is no need to add CaCl to the washing solution.
Alex-The Cheesepenter