Author Topic: Gouda - my first project post  (Read 1246 times)

Offline Zoey

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Gouda - my first project post
« on: August 31, 2009, 01:46:14 AM »

So this is the third gouda I'm making in my life (also the third hard cheese). Made it on wednesday, 26th August.

Made using buttermilk as culture, pressed under whey, pressed under 15 large books (15kg?) turning frequently and finally pressing over night (approx 12 hours in total maybe).

Brined for the following day, and dried in room temperature for 2 days. Then into fridge. Planning to eat half of it on 9th September, then leave the rest to age some longer (any ideas on how to cover up the cut when continuing the aging process?

Yep, it's got character. More character would be visible on the downside, but of course I'm showing you the better side. :)



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Offline Wayne Harris

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Re: Gouda - my first project post
« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2009, 07:25:14 AM »
It looks good from here. 
How long do you plan on aging it?  What kind of rind do you plan on using?
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Offline Zoey

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Re: Gouda - my first project post
« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2009, 08:50:08 AM »

Thanks Wayne!
I'm planning on using just the natural rind, since I want to cut into it in three weeks, which seems to be the minimum that anyone has suggested. :)

Since this is my third gouda, I'm still so new at this that I really need to have some rewards... hence the 21-day aging time.

I'm still wondering if I can continue aging a part of it after it's cut? Any suggestions? I don't have a vacuumer, but I'm wondering if it would still develop a natural rind after cutting? Maybe if I salt/brine the cut? Or maybe I wax half the cheese after I cut it?

Offline Alex

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Re: Gouda - my first project post
« Reply #3 on: August 31, 2009, 10:50:36 AM »
You can wax the half cheese, I do it sometimes, it's OK. I think it is not possible to develope a rind on the cut. You may also coat the cheese with olive oil and some shrink. Don't forget that ageing Gouda in an ordinary fridge (because of the too low temperature) and the cheese is made from pasteurized milk, it will take very long time to develope a good aroma.
« Last Edit: August 31, 2009, 09:44:02 PM by Alex »
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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Gouda - my first project post
« Reply #4 on: August 31, 2009, 08:41:15 PM »
Looks great Zoey! Congrats! Maybe try putting it in a bag and sucking the air out? I'd oil it first though.


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Offline Zoey

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Re: Gouda - my first project post
« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2009, 08:30:18 AM »

Okay, here's some update on my progress notes.

My previous two gouda-tries ended up with quite a lot of mold, which kind of ruined the projects. I decided (yep, it's my decision) that the mold came from too moist cheese. So here are my steps to prevent future ruinage:

 - I cut the curds smaller - result firmer curd formation, definately more dry
 - I pressed the cheese drier (longer pressing time) - result much more solid cheese, no fear of breaking it while handling
 - I brined it longer - result more developed rind, providing better protection for my prescious cheese, for sure
 - I used extra care for drying the cheese with a cloth after brining - result obvious: instant drier surface
 - I dried the cheese in room temperature first, which was because my fridge easily gets too damp when putting a cheese in - result faster drying, again better rind development

So, I'm having huge expectations for my cheese. :)

BTW - I'm trying Havarti next. I was reading about the aging process, and I'm under the expression (correct me if I'm wrong) that Havarti's surface stays moister during the whole process, because no rind is developed. I wonder if the fight against unwanted mold growth leans to the fact that the Havarti is washed with brine regularly - maybe the repeated salt treatment kills of the mold before it starts to grow? How about the B.linens, does it also protect the cheese from mold? Still wondering if I should do Havarti with or without the smear.

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Gouda - my first project post
« Reply #6 on: September 01, 2009, 10:39:44 PM »
I've never seen Havarto with a smear but Danlac's recipe calls for it. With the havartis you can vacuum seal them within a few days once the rind is dry to keep them soft and creamy.

Offline Zoey

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Re: Gouda - my first project post
« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2009, 01:18:18 AM »

Okay - I ended my soooo long waiting and cracked this one open - yes, at 12 days.

It actually tasted really good - just like some mild edam cheese that we have available in the stores here in Finland. The natural rind was a bit sharp in taste though (bad way) - I'm thinking maybe too acidic? Unless someone has other suggestions, I'm gonna try a little less starter culture next time (oh, and any suggestions on how to measure acidity without an acid meter would be apprecciated too).

So it seems 12 days is perfectly enough to create a mild, pleasant taste. I wonder why I never see this young cheese in the stores. Well anyway. My better half said we don't need to buy cheese this week because we can eat this one at breakfast. That was some compliment. :)

Notes on the dryer cheese:

Alright, I definately managed to make it dryer than last time. This one had some teeny-tiny holes in it, and the texture was easy to cut (I bet it also melts beautifully, but haven't tried yet). I think I may have overdone the dryness-thing, but not by much. Next time I think I'm going to cut the curds just a little bigger and cook a little less. But pressing and everything after that seems fine to me, so no changes there.

I need to get my next cheese in the press real soon. Another gouda, I think. Planning on fashioning a new mold too - something that could lessen my "character" situation. Maybe even two molds - then I could do one with seasoning and one without, from the same batch.

This was my first cheese in quite a while, and the first one I made during my current relationship. So the better half commented: "I don't see what's all the fuss about cheese making being so hard, you obviously did it right away". Well, as much as I apprecciate the evaluation of my cheese, I wish he would see the effort I put into it.  :-\

Offline John (CH)

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Re: Gouda - my first project post
« Reply #8 on: September 08, 2009, 02:08:16 AM »
Congrats on the better Gouda Zoey, and thanks for the ideas. Yep every cheese I make is a "labour of love", alot of labour and sometimes don't get much love back ;D.

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Gouda - my first project post
« Reply #9 on: September 08, 2009, 06:32:07 PM »
One of the things that aging does is mellow the cheese as it's acidity improves?/increases? with age.  Sounds like you did good gal! Congrats!

They will never understand how much sweat we put into our cheeses.  :D

Had to edit poor choice of words ...
« Last Edit: September 13, 2009, 09:45:52 PM by DeejayDebi »


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