Author Topic: Aging Blue & Other Cheeses In Same Cheese Cave  (Read 1324 times)

Offline Webmaster

  • Administrator
  • Mature Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Doha, Qatar
  • Posts: 138
  • Cheeses: 27
    • CheeseForum.org
Aging Blue & Other Cheeses In Same Cheese Cave
« on: September 02, 2009, 05:41:40 AM »
This question was posted by member Zoey but split into new post/thread:
Quote
Questions:

 - I'm aging a Gouda right now, and am about to do a Havarti. Does this rule out blue, or is it possible to isolate the blue well enough that the mold won't spread to cheeses that reside just a few centimeters from it?
 - If I have blue or camembert somewhere else in the fridge (for eating, not aging) outside the fruit box, would that likely contaminate my aging cheese?
Quote
BTW, has anyone got experience from aging a blue cheese in a container which can be flipped over entirely, without taking the cheese out and so avoiding daily contact with the molds and lessen the risk of cross-contamination? I was thinking about doing just that... (never even tried a blue yet, so this is pretty much just throwing ideas)


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline John (CH)

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Katy, Houston, Texas, USA
  • Posts: 4,069
  • Cheeses: 60
Re: Aging Blue & Other Cheeses In Same Cheese Cave
« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2009, 05:54:14 AM »
Zoey, blues are notorious for jumping to and dominating other nearby cheeses, there are some posts here, and I think elsewhere just can't find it. Most people go with separate cheese cave for blues.

I believe the only cheeses that can fend of attacks from blues are Geotrichum candidum and Penicillium candidum (white mold type cheeses). Someone please correct me if I'm wrong!?

Good idea on an isolation container for blue so that you minimize physical contact with the blue. Blue's are initially very moist, so you'd have to keep lid cracked to reduce moisture. Leaving air contamination route.

Offline Zoey

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Finland
  • Posts: 144
  • Cheeses: 6
  • Default personal text
Re: Aging Blue & Other Cheeses In Same Cheese Cave
« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2009, 08:32:59 AM »

Thanks again John!
I was afraid it would be necessary to leave open that air contamination route, and it seems you just confirmed my fear.

I noticed there are previous threads about the issue, but it seems to me it is unclear whether the p.roqueforti can go airborn or not. Well, I guess it's a risk that not many are willing to take considering the large amount of work they've done with their other cheeses.

Having eaten a lot of store-bought blues though, I'm wondering why those never cross-contaminated my other cheese. Maybe it's different because of the flipping and continuous touching, moving around (maybe that releases particles that float about, I dunno) or just poor hygiene when flipping different cheeses.

After all, I never touch my store-bought cheese unless I'm putting it into my mouth...

This really keeps me puzzled, since I soooo want to try a stilton, but also want to eat my Gouda and coming Havarti without p.roqueforti in it. No chance of getting another cave any time soon. :(

Offline FRANCOIS

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Posts: 788
  • Cheeses: 71
  • Default personal text
Re: Aging Blue & Other Cheeses In Same Cheese Cave
« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2009, 04:19:29 PM »
It can be done if you structure your recipes correctly and put in the effort aging.  I kept blues mixed with many other cheeses in my cooler in the states.  At our plant here we actually age our R&D cheeses in a cooler that is in the center of the blue make area. We have whites, smears and washed rind cheeses aging well there.  The trick is that the blue never gets a chance to set up shop on the cheeses, i.e. no rind is ever bare.  Right out of the brine they are being treated with soemthing that will retard blue growth.  These cheeses all require attention every day though.

Offline Zoey

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Finland
  • Posts: 144
  • Cheeses: 6
  • Default personal text
Re: Aging Blue & Other Cheeses In Same Cheese Cave
« Reply #4 on: September 03, 2009, 01:16:30 AM »

Francois, that sounds very interesting. You must be right about that, and maybe when I'm more experienced, I will try that out. Sounds like it's more a question about care and effort, than one of extreme difficulty. It's a pity that carefulness is not one of my virtues...

You seem like the ultimate cheese making guru. I'm really impressed that you still want to make the effort to share your information to us mortals. :)


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline Baby Chee

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Clifford, North Dakota
  • Posts: 356
  • Cheeses: 9
  • Small Time, Big Taste
Re: Aging Blue & Other Cheeses In Same Cheese Cave
« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2009, 06:36:33 AM »
I believe the only cheeses that can fend of attacks from blues are Geotrichum candidum and Penicillium candidum (white mold type cheeses). Someone please correct me if I'm wrong!?

Has anyone ever given you data or opinion to contradict this?  I am curious because I have a Camembert and want to cave it with a couple Stiltons.  It would be nice to make more Cam and Stilton and pack the cave in future.

My hard cheeses, Gouda and Havarti, will probably dry and wax because I am afraid of cross contamination in the cave.
“For centuries, people thought the moon was made of green cheese. Then the astronauts found that the moon is really a big hard rock. That's what happens to cheese when you leave it out.”

Offline FRANCOIS

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Posts: 788
  • Cheeses: 71
  • Default personal text
Re: Aging Blue & Other Cheeses In Same Cheese Cave
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2009, 03:16:49 PM »
The answer is sometimes.  Sometimes the whites will over take, sometimes they won't.  It's usually a fairly safe bet though.  There are a number of blue bries on the market and they are basically skewered bries that have the p.cand grown after the blue has started.  I think they are tricky though as you need to start the p. cand after the blue has grown inside, but not too much or it will inhibit white growth.  You need to watch those cheeses carefully.

Offline Baby Chee

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Clifford, North Dakota
  • Posts: 356
  • Cheeses: 9
  • Small Time, Big Taste
Re: Aging Blue & Other Cheeses In Same Cheese Cave
« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2009, 03:52:25 PM »
Thanks for that heads-up!

I still have some blue flipping days before I cave them with Camb.  But the Camb might be able to come out as the blue goes it.  I might be able to work it.
“For centuries, people thought the moon was made of green cheese. Then the astronauts found that the moon is really a big hard rock. That's what happens to cheese when you leave it out.”