Author Topic: Mushrooms - Using In Penicllium candidum Cheese Making  (Read 2630 times)

Offline Ziggy

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Mushrooms - Using In Penicllium candidum Cheese Making
« on: September 03, 2009, 08:43:31 PM »
Has anyone on  here ever done this?

 I have had it "store bought" but am thinking of trying to try to make myself.

Would you use fresh or dried mushrooms?

When would you add the mushrooms?
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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Mushrooms - Using In Penicllium candidum Cheese Making
« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2009, 01:17:31 AM »
I have not used mushrooms in my cheese but if I were going to I'd use dried mushrooms. I have had much better luck using dried then fresh fuirts and vegetables.

Offline Alex

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Re: Mushrooms - Using In Penicllium candidum Cheese Making
« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2009, 01:56:25 AM »
Never used mushrooms. To my taste Camebert/Brie have a strong and unique enough flavor without them.

Debi: fresh fruit is too moist to be added to cheese. The only vegetables I've used in cheeses, were fresh green and red hot peppers for my Pepper Jack. Cut them into 2 mm cubes, pat dry with a paper towel and mixed into the curds.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2009, 11:49:34 AM by Alex »
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Offline Ziggy

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Re: Mushrooms - Using In Penicllium candidum Cheese Making
« Reply #3 on: September 05, 2009, 08:00:27 AM »
Thanks Alex and Debi,


I agree I like Camembert and Brie just as is but am looking at options to test for my future  professional cheese operation.

Customers seem to  like "specialties" and it is always good to have something unique to offer.
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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Mushrooms - Using In Penicllium candidum Cheese Making
« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2009, 09:21:30 AM »
I agree Alex I tried fresh peppers in a cheddar many moons ago and it was slimey. Although pickled peppers and cukes seemed to work okay after they are chopped and dried.


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Offline Alex

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Re: Mushrooms - Using In Penicllium candidum Cheese Making
« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2009, 11:57:51 AM »
Thanks Alex and Debi,


I agree I like Camembert and Brie just as is but am looking at options to test for my future  professional cheese operation.

Customers seem to  like "specialties" and it is always good to have something unique to offer.
Siegfried,

Let me recommend some specialties, like some Lactic Cheese with nuts or dried fruits, ash coated or not, washed rind or not.
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Offline Alex

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Re: Mushrooms - Using In Penicllium candidum Cheese Making
« Reply #6 on: September 05, 2009, 12:08:53 PM »
Some more specialties:
A Camembert, after it bloomed, wrapped in wet handkerchief for the next 15 days. Wet=Cider, you have to keep the wetness. It is a Camembert Affine au Cidre de la Maison.
Another one is the Boulette d'Avesnes, with chopped fresh parsley leaves and Pen Cand, coated with sweet paprika and washed with beer twice a week. You can use dill, garlic, almost whatever instead of parsley.
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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Mushrooms - Using In Penicllium candidum Cheese Making
« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2009, 08:16:59 PM »
That Boulette d'Avesnes look very tasty. Would you mind sharing how it is made?

I have been think about making a Spanish tetilla next which is also a hershy kiss shape. Are they similar?

Offline Alex

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Re: Mushrooms - Using In Penicllium candidum Cheese Making
« Reply #8 on: September 06, 2009, 12:41:29 PM »
The lactic cheese recipe is here:
http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,1988.msg14652.html#msg14652
After draining is finished, I form the cheese by hand (it's a bit messy and sticky) and roll it in sweet paprika. Oh, I forgott, before shaping, the Parsley or whwtever has to be added. Now I put it in the cave and wait untill fully covered with white mold. From now on I washed it twice a week with beer. The cracked one is 3 months old. If I missed somthing, please ask.
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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Mushrooms - Using In Penicllium candidum Cheese Making
« Reply #9 on: September 06, 2009, 01:21:05 PM »
Thank you Alex I think I will be trying this one soon.
I feel it melting my mouth already!


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Offline Ziggy

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Re: Mushrooms - Using In Penicllium candidum Cheese Making
« Reply #10 on: September 08, 2009, 07:28:35 AM »
Alex,

Thanks for all the pictures and suggestions. Are you a professional cheesemaker?

I see you are in Israel. Last year at the ADGA convention I met a young man from Israel (I wish I had not lost his contact information). He had some interesting stories of how he herded his goats out in open country. .

It sounds like there are some great small farmstead type cheese operations over there. Would love to visit to learn more  if I had the time and money.
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Offline Alex

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Re: Mushrooms - Using In Penicllium candidum Cheese Making
« Reply #11 on: September 08, 2009, 10:48:34 AM »
Alex,

Thanks for all the pictures and suggestions. Are you a professional cheesemaker?

I see you are in Israel. Last year at the ADGA convention I met a young man from Israel (I wish I had not lost his contact information). He had some interesting stories of how he herded his goats out in open country. .

It sounds like there are some great small farmstead type cheese operations over there. Would love to visit to learn more  if I had the time and money.

Siegfried,

I am not a professional, this is one of my hobbies but I am thorough about it. My knowlage is based on a seminar of 35 hours including practice, books and internet. Fortunatly I have access to cows and goats raw milk, unfortunately, I have difficulties getting some kinds of cultures, molds and yeasts here in Israel. My folks like the french type soft and semi-hard cheeses.

Happy cheesing
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Offline Ziggy

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Re: Mushrooms - Using In Penicllium candidum Cheese Making
« Reply #12 on: September 09, 2009, 07:21:04 AM »
Thanks Alex. I can see that the seminars and research must have really paid off as you are very knowledgeable,

Can you tell me (or point me to some inforamtion) that would explain what can and cant be put into a cheese (eg fruits, nuts, herbs, meat) and how do you know if it will spoil or not?
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Offline Tom Turophile / CheeseStud

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Re: Mushrooms - Using In Penicllium candidum Cheese Making
« Reply #13 on: September 09, 2009, 10:25:04 AM »
I think the smoky flavor of dried mushrooms would be wonderful -- but maybe not in camembert.

That Boulette d'Avesnes looks wonderful -- another great ingredient to use could be smoked paprika.

BTW I just read where that, um, "kiss" shape comes from for tetilla:
http://www.cnn.com/2009/TRAVEL/getaways/09/07/spain.food.travel/index.html

Quote
I see rickety card tables filled with yellow cheeses shaped like giant Hershey's Kisses ... or, to locals, breasts. This local cheese is called "tetilla" to revenge a prudish priest who, seven centuries ago, told a sculptor at the cathedral to redo a statue that he considered too buxom. Ever since, the townsfolk have shaped their cheese like exactly what the priest didn't want them to see carved in stone. You can't go anywhere in Santiago without seeing its creamy, mild tetilla.
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Offline Alex

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Re: Mushrooms - Using In Penicllium candidum Cheese Making
« Reply #14 on: September 09, 2009, 10:51:47 AM »
Thanks Alex. I can see that the seminars and research must have really paid off as you are very knowledgeable,

Can you tell me (or point me to some inforamtion) that would explain what can and cant be put into a cheese (eg fruits, nuts, herbs, meat) and how do you know if it will spoil or not?

I do not have any written material about additives to cheeses. The Boulette d'Avesnes I made per description I found in a french cheeses book. I like to experiment, and with short term cheeses (mainly lactic types) it is very rewarding. As a matter of fact too moist ingredients should be avoided. For example, you can add chopped sauted onions, but not frehly prepared, dried store bought. So, any kind of green herbs like parsley, dill, thyme, etc., may be added fresh or dry. Nuts of different kinds and dried fruits are wellcome. To my Pepper Jack, I add fresh hot peppers finley chopped.
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