Author Topic: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses  (Read 11640 times)

Offline Cremaster

  • New Cheese
  • *
  • Posts: 3
  • Cheeses: 0
  • Default personal text
Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« on: September 04, 2009, 10:04:39 PM »
I purchased a bleu that was wrapped in sycamore leaves. One of the best bleus I have ever experienced!!!! I got to where I ate leaves and all, love does strange things. Any way the leaves had a wonderful essence that was transferred to the cheese.

I am wondering if black walnut leaves would be a good/interesting substitute. What do you guys think? I am wanting to make a cheese and wrap it in leaves like the bleu. Other than is black walnut a good leaf to use, how would you harvest the leaves, when would you harvest them (green or brown), how would you store them for later use, would you need to sanitize them and of course how do you get all those leafs to pretend to be a large piece of storage paper or cheese cloth?

Has anyone ever put black walnuts in a cheese? Technique and results please if you have.

Thanks, I am new here and still exploring the site. Nice site.


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline FRANCOIS

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Posts: 788
  • Cheeses: 71
  • Default personal text
Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2009, 11:29:16 PM »
Yes to all of the above.  You can also seperate layer sof cheese with black walnuts.

The leaves need to be harvested green for wrapping.  Steam blanch them and drain.  You can store them in the freezer right after blanching. 

If you want more flavor you can soak the blanched leaves in beer/wine/liquor.

Black walnut leaves are typically not used for wrapping though.  They are used for the attached photo.  This is packed in dried leaves in a terra cotta pot.
 

Offline Alex

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Haifa,Israel
  • Posts: 732
  • Cheeses: 27
  • Default personal text
Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2009, 01:48:40 AM »
I made a Manchego at the end of July and wraped it with grape leaves. I'd like to wait untill the end of Sept to cut it.

Cremaster: you may use almost every kind of leaves, vegetable, trees, the time they are not poisenous. There is the Yarg cheese wraped with nettle leaves.

FRANCOIS: to freeze blanched leaves, it's good to wrap them in thin layers with aluminium foil.

Tip: I've seen how the Druize people preserve large quantities of grape leaves for winter. They roll the fresh leaves (not blanched) very tight and fill with them 1.5 liters soft drink plastic bottles. With time, the leaves dry out (I not realy understand how, because the bottle is closed) and somehow gas is released that makes the bottle stiff like a rock. To use the leaves, they cut/breake the bottle and only now blanch them.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2009, 12:18:17 PM by Alex »
Alex-The Cheesepenter

Offline FRANCOIS

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Posts: 788
  • Cheeses: 71
  • Default personal text
Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #3 on: September 05, 2009, 04:19:12 AM »
You're right, I left that out.  I used to lay them out on a cookie pan and seperate with wax paper.

You can also vacuum seal ther leaves and they will ensile, which gives a sweet sort of taste.

Offline DeejayDebi

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Connecticut
  • Posts: 5,804
  • Cheeses: 95
    • Deejays Smoke Pit and DSP Forums
Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2009, 09:37:49 AM »
I didn't even think of grape leaves! Goin to head outside and see if they are any goods one left. Thanks!


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline Alex

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Haifa,Israel
  • Posts: 732
  • Cheeses: 27
  • Default personal text
Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2009, 12:21:12 PM »
This is how my Manchego looks wrapped with grape leaves
Alex-The Cheesepenter

Offline DeejayDebi

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Connecticut
  • Posts: 5,804
  • Cheeses: 95
    • Deejays Smoke Pit and DSP Forums
Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #6 on: September 05, 2009, 07:59:17 PM »
Very nice Alex! Very nice!

Offline John (CH)

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Katy, Houston, Texas, USA
  • Posts: 4,069
  • Cheeses: 60
Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2009, 09:44:40 PM »
Echo Debi, great looking grape leaves!

Offline FRANCOIS

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Posts: 788
  • Cheeses: 71
  • Default personal text
Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2009, 11:26:47 PM »
Deb,
While you can use leaves this late in the season, they will be thick and difficult to wrap with.  You should pick leaves in June, when the vineyards are doing their first cuts, and save these leaves.  They are the easiest to work with plus they have the least amount of insect damage.  Suprisingly the best grape leaves I found in CT were the wild ones.  Perfect size, shape and very delicate in comparison to some of the cultivated varieties.

Offline DeejayDebi

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Connecticut
  • Posts: 5,804
  • Cheeses: 95
    • Deejays Smoke Pit and DSP Forums
Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #9 on: September 06, 2009, 11:53:44 AM »
Yes I think you are right Franscois my little grape vines are getting dry and brittle already. We have had some very cold night already in the 40's and they are ready to fall. They will be brown in a short while I think.  Next year!


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline Tropit

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Central Coast of CA
  • Posts: 149
  • Cheeses: 5
  • Default personal text
Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #10 on: October 25, 2009, 07:44:25 AM »
I made a few, small wheels of a Jack cheese with grassy herbs and would like to wrap it in fig leaves that have been soaked in vermouth and gin and tie with string.  (Heck...I might drink the marinade when I'm done.)  At what stage do I start wrapping?  Do I just use the leaves as they are, or should I dip them in lard, or?  Suggestions please...thanks.

~Cindy
~Cindy

Offline Alex

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Haifa,Israel
  • Posts: 732
  • Cheeses: 27
  • Default personal text
Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #11 on: October 25, 2009, 09:24:07 AM »
You have to poach the leaves to soften them. Wrap after brining and drying.
Alex-The Cheesepenter

Offline Tea

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,914
  • Cheeses: 27
Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #12 on: October 25, 2009, 03:26:52 PM »
You can do the same with grape leaves too.  Agree with Alex, they need to be put in boiling water first.

Offline FRANCOIS

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Posts: 788
  • Cheeses: 71
  • Default personal text
Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #13 on: October 26, 2009, 03:13:34 AM »
I always got better results steam blanching, rather than poaching.  It made the leaves more pliable quickly without breaking them down.

FYI some leaves will be ready very quickly (like grape) while others will take forever (like most tree leaves).

Offline Tropit

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Central Coast of CA
  • Posts: 149
  • Cheeses: 5
  • Default personal text
Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #14 on: October 27, 2009, 08:08:54 AM »
Thanks everyone...

This cheese is totally experimental.  I wrapped them in parboiled fig leaves and tied with string.  Amazingly, the water left the boiled fig leaves looked brown and smelled like fig syrup...yummm!  I think that my cheese is still a little wet.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2009, 09:17:41 AM by Tropit »
~Cindy