Author Topic: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses  (Read 11992 times)

Offline Alex

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #45 on: June 03, 2010, 12:09:03 PM »
Yoav,

The preserved leaves won't be good. The fresh ones I only poach them, no need to boil. Olive leaves are too small and too tough. Don't soak the leaves  in Brandy, etc. I've made a Camembert Affine au Cidre de la Maison. It should have been wrapped with a handkerchief soaked in cider and regularly hydrated for 14 days (in the cave). I hadn't cider, so I had to use some substitute. It was worth the experiment. On the attached pics you can see the wrapped and the opened cheese.
Don't ignore all kinds of additives into the cheese. Look at the one with wall nuts, you have my permission ;) to introduce it to the french chef.
At last, it looks like a Tetilla, actually it is Boulette d'Avesnes. It's made from cow's milk + P.Candidum, as a lactic type cheese, formed by hand to the typical bullet shape and washed with beer after blooming.
Alex-The Cheesepenter


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Offline iratherfly

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #46 on: June 06, 2010, 02:43:35 AM »
I think you are right about the olive leaves. The grape leaves make sense just to poach, maple leaves and chestnuts leaves still need boiling or cooking int he brandy/calvados/marc.

I still think that Calvados would give it lots of character. Calvados is also a fantastic replacement for Cider. What did you end up using with this camembert? I assume that you aged it normally for a week and then two weeks with hanketcheif, then a few days without it to get it dry? I have seen a fantastic Camembert (Cru) of Normandie that was aged in Calvados and coated with bread crumbs in France. yummm

The Bouca cheese with the walnuts is indeed beautiful. My issue is more with peppers, fresh herbs (or dry herbs inside which become overly very bitter as their essential oils break down when the cheese ages).

Offline Alex

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #47 on: June 06, 2010, 07:58:23 AM »
I used a nonalcoholic cider, as for the affinage, your description is right.
Alex-The Cheesepenter

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #48 on: June 06, 2010, 01:16:31 PM »
I am so glad this came up again I had forgotten and my grapes have leaves now. Love the look of your cheeses so lovely. Hope they will be good for a few weeks I am leaving for my annual smokeout (BBQ) with my forum member in a few days and can't make cheeese this week.

Offline iratherfly

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #49 on: June 06, 2010, 04:00:14 PM »
You selling them Debi? If they are from trees that were not treated with chemicals I would love to buy some


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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #50 on: June 06, 2010, 04:23:37 PM »
Well I certaainly wouldn't sell them but maybe I could mail you some. I only have two small vines and I am not sure what to look for exactly. Any leave that isn't eatten? I do not use chemicals of any kind unless you consider dish soap a chemical I do use that sometimes or moth balls I use them for ants and bugs too.

My leaves are smaller than the size of my hand is that big enough? Should I cook them first or leave them raw? I'm thinking maybe I could vacuum seal them to keep them moist? Any Ideas?

Offline MarkShelton

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #51 on: June 06, 2010, 06:43:04 PM »
I've got about 20 grapevines, and while I don't want to just start plucking away at the leaves, I can send you some when it is time to thin the leaves out, or when the grapes are nearly ripe. I don't use any chemicals on the vines. I'd just charge you for the shipping, you don't have to worry about buying them.

What would be the best way to ship them? Frozen? Zip-locked? Maybe with dry ice?
I am constantly in awe of the very first people that consumed these things, despite how funky looking and smelling they had become.

Offline Brie

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #52 on: June 06, 2010, 07:21:22 PM »
I want some! Please, please, please. My left arm will be in the mail to you! Okay, not really. If they are fresh from the vine, then I would imagine zip-locked in a sturdy envelope would be fine--we cannot let the leaves fold or break. Let me know if I am one of the priveleged.
Darn, another cheese meltdown--ahh, perfect fondue.

Offline MarkShelton

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #53 on: June 06, 2010, 07:42:22 PM »
It will be quite a while until verasion (when the grapes start changing color and ripening). At that point, the grapes will be hanging freely and I'll pluck leaves that are crowding and shading the ripening grapes. I'm not sure how many will be available, but I'll put up a thread then and go from there based on interest and feasibility.
I am constantly in awe of the very first people that consumed these things, despite how funky looking and smelling they had become.

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #54 on: June 06, 2010, 07:57:56 PM »
Do you know when a leaf is ripe?


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Offline iratherfly

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #55 on: June 06, 2010, 10:30:02 PM »
Thank you Debi and Mark! That's so kind of you! If you accept PayPal let me at least pay for the shipping!

I think vacuum or Ziploc would be enough. These leaves are not like perishable food, they can last OK for a couple of days in the mail. The size doesn't really matter much as I can use them for anything from Cabecou, or Crottin all the way to large Tomme.
I am doing some experiments lately with tiny one-bite (35g/2oz a pop) cheeses of intense creamy flavors. The Cabecou Feuille or Banon de Chalais are great examples for what I am trying to do.
http://www.artisanalcheese.com/cheeses/Cabecou-Feuille
http://www.artisanalcheese.com/prodinfo.asp?number=PC-10036

I will send you guys the address in a private message

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #56 on: June 06, 2010, 10:47:43 PM »
It will be quite a while until verasion (when the grapes start changing color and ripening). At that point, the grapes will be hanging freely and I'll pluck leaves that are crowding and shading the ripening grapes. I'm not sure how many will be available, but I'll put up a thread then and go from there based on interest and feasibility.

Mark -

I have NO idea what you just said but I thought the leaves were to be young new leaves no? Anyone know what a ripe leave should look like? Am I looking for something special? I wouldn't want to make anyone sick. I will be heading out in a few days for a mad dash to PA, KY and TN  in 10 days driving so I don't really have time right now but I will get on it when I get back - remind me least I forget! You guys have my email!

Offline MarkShelton

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #57 on: June 07, 2010, 07:47:16 AM »
Actually, I have no idea when a leaf is ripe...
I've usually just concerned myself with the ripening of the grapes. I'll check on it.
I am constantly in awe of the very first people that consumed these things, despite how funky looking and smelling they had become.

Offline mtncheesemaker(Pam)

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #58 on: June 07, 2010, 08:21:54 AM »
Brie, I could send you some also. I am in Colorado so much closer to you for shipping.
Pam

Offline iratherfly

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #59 on: June 07, 2010, 10:17:57 AM »
I think that when the leaf is still green but not tiny or brand new than it must be ripe. I assume that if there are ripe grapes on the vine than it will be at the peak of its sugar levels. It really doesn't matter much; you just use them as a food wrap that is decorative and safe to eat. The ripeness of them does not affect the cheese as I understand it; you blench/steep/marinate them in liquor (Brandy, Grapa, Marc, Calvados, etc) and the leaves release the flavors, sugars and aromas slowly back into the cheese - that's what's important