Author Topic: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses  (Read 13159 times)

Offline MarkShelton

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #60 on: June 07, 2010, 04:53:40 PM »
From what I found, leaves that are picked to make into food are best picked from spring to early summer. That way, they are still tender. They tend to get tougher and more fiberous as the summer goes on.

If they are going to be used for the flavor they infuse when you wrap a cheese in them, as opposed to eating them in a dish, I'm not sure that they need to be young, though younger leaves would be more supple and less likely to break or tear if wrapping a cheese. If they are boiled/blanched/marinated, etc before they are applied, I'm not sure this will make a difference either. I don't know much about the process, but I'd be interested in seeing the results.
I am constantly in awe of the very first people that consumed these things, despite how funky looking and smelling they had become.

Offline Brie

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #61 on: June 07, 2010, 06:13:53 PM »
Thanks, Pam--I'll take you up on that! I'll post my address in a PM and let me know how much it costs.
Thanks again!
Darn, another cheese meltdown--ahh, perfect fondue.

Offline MarkShelton

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #62 on: June 07, 2010, 07:34:24 PM »
Going along with the grape theme, check out this cheese, called Sarments d'Amour (branch of love). They are originally from the Rhone where goat herds and vineyards are plentiful. I'm sure the grapevine cutting doesn't impart any flavors, but adds a flair to this cheese.

(I didn't make them, just saw them in the World Cheese Book and found some pics online)
I am constantly in awe of the very first people that consumed these things, despite how funky looking and smelling they had become.

Offline iratherfly

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #63 on: June 07, 2010, 08:29:38 PM »
Pam - I'll take you up on it too!

Mark - I love it! Did you make it? Are you intending to? Have you seen the photos I put on this board which I took in France last month? They had these tiny one-bite goat cheeses on sticks they call Barrate ("churn" in French).  I am now working on my own recipe for a very similar cheese, only it's cylindrical in shape instead of cone and the buckwheat straw in the center will deliver air to with a slight smear of of P.Roqueforti, resulting in a single blue vain inside. I will send photos when I finally get it right. Takes a lot of work to get this one to work..

Here is the photo of the Barrate cheese from Paris

Offline judec

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #64 on: June 10, 2010, 08:57:06 PM »
Hi Alex,
Just looking at this thread and wondering if you can tell me, do you age some of your cheeses in tinfoil??  Just looking at the pictures of your yummy fridge full.

Jude.

Offline Alex

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #65 on: June 10, 2010, 09:22:18 PM »
Yes Jude, in the past I did wrap mold ripened cheeses in wrinkled alum foil, to keep humidity level high as needed. Since I have the US Cold Mist Humidifier in the "cave", I don't need this method.
Alex-The Cheesepenter

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #66 on: June 27, 2010, 01:23:50 PM »
Just wondering if anyone came up with an idea for what constitutes a ripe grape leaf yet?

Offline MarkShelton

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #67 on: June 27, 2010, 01:58:57 PM »
As far as I can tell, and from what I have found out, grape leaves do not need to "ripen". They are not like a fruit that needs to build up sugar. However, it makes a difference when you pick them in that the older they get, the more tough and fibrous they become. So if you intend to make stuffed grape leaves, or another dish where they are consumed, then it is best to pick them early summer when they are still tender. If used for a wrapper, then I'm not sure it would make a difference.
I am constantly in awe of the very first people that consumed these things, despite how funky looking and smelling they had become.

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Grape Leaves
« Reply #68 on: June 27, 2010, 03:09:21 PM »
Great thanks. I didn't know how leaves acted for food.

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #69 on: July 03, 2010, 03:20:08 PM »
Just cut the grass back there and checked my grape vines they are really shaded this year by the danged neighbors pine tree that's over growning my yard. Not a lot of leaves this year mostly naked vines. I think he is killing my grape vines with that danged pine tree.

Offline iratherfly

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #70 on: July 03, 2010, 10:50:56 PM »
So while I am waiting for grape leaves, I tried a few cheeses with the far more delicate Sesame leaves. They are beautiful to look at and they are so thin that they easily absorb anything you steep them in. They also stick to the cheese in a matter that makes them more likely to be eaten rather than peeled away and tossed.

I first steeped them in Rum and wrapped a Crottin with them. The rind grew through them! They had a really nice effect on the flavor.
On my second try, I steeped them in Calvados. I then wrapped them over this tiny surface-ripened goat's cheese I make which I call Booba (It's a one-biter 35g/2Oz)

This is what it looked like:

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #71 on: July 03, 2010, 10:56:59 PM »
They are so cute!

Offline iratherfly

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #72 on: July 04, 2010, 04:13:19 AM »
Thanks Debi! I call them Booba - it's Hebrew for "Baby" or "Doll". My Fiancée's pet name :)

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #73 on: July 04, 2010, 11:02:33 AM »
Cute name too!

Offline iratherfly

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #74 on: July 18, 2010, 12:32:49 AM »
A shout out to Pam.... THANK YOU!!!
Soaked your grape leaves in Calvados for a few days and began wrapping my 14 day old Crottins. I don't actually know if this should be done (beginning, middle or end of ripening? Tight or loose? Should it be soaking wet or wiped off first? Dry? How long should it be steeped in the Calvados? I know some people do this for months and some don't wait at all - does anyone know?)

I figured at 14 days it has enough rind to take on an external influence, yet not enough rind to block off the flavor enhancement.

I know, this rind is strangely spotty (Geo all around but little spots of high PC blooming here and there, really weird but I always get that). I wonder what the leaves will do