Author Topic: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses  (Read 13327 times)

Offline Alex

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #15 on: October 27, 2009, 11:37:22 AM »
Make sure no air is trapped between the cheese and the leaves, otherwise you'll grow mold.
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Offline Gürkan Yeniçeri

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #16 on: October 28, 2009, 10:43:34 PM »
Cindy,

If you are close to a Turkish community go to the grocery shop there and ask for "dolma leaves" which is grape leaves preserved with heavy salt and vacuum packaged. It works well with cheese.

I have never tried Fig leaves but you may be right with the application of lard first and wrapping the cheese with fig leaves. I have used lard with a farm house cheddar and wrapped it with old cheese cloth. It will be drier than the other waxed ones though.

Offline Alex

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #17 on: October 29, 2009, 12:20:35 AM »
Applying lard first will insulate the penetration of the grape leaves taste.
Preserved grape leaves do not have the real taste of the fresh ones.
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Offline Tropit

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #18 on: October 29, 2009, 10:27:46 AM »
Thanks for all the tips.

So....here's what I did: 
- I had two, small, 3" wheels of jack that had air dried for about 2 days. 
- I had been soaking the washed fig leaves in vermouth and gin for a few days prior, (before you all gave me other great ideas.) 
- I then took the leaves out of the marinade, washed them again and put them n boiling water for about 20 mins.  The leaves stayed somewhat firm and green, but did oxidize a little and were more pliable to work with.  The water looked a figgy brown and really smelled like figs...cool! 
- After that, I wrapped up the cheeses and dropped each wheel back in the marinade for about an hour.  (What the he**...sounded good at the time.)
- They are now curing in a plastic box with a paper napkin in there to absorb the extra moisture. I unwrapped one today to check for mold...none yet, fingers crossed. They smell heavenly!

~Cindy

Offline FRANCOIS

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #19 on: October 29, 2009, 01:39:54 PM »
I always blanch then soak overnight, wrap cheese the next day.  I only pat dry the leaves before using.

Offline Kelley

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #20 on: October 30, 2009, 03:42:20 AM »
I prefer to freeze my leaves instead of cooking them. I can gather them in season, keep them fresh in the freezer, then bring them out at any time of year to use them as a wrap for the cheeses.
Whether you soak them in brandy or alcohol would depend on what type of cheese you are wrapping and what you want as your final result.  My favorite leaf wrap is nettles. Freezing removes their sting, and the nettles impart a wonderful flavor, and allow a lovely natural rind to form, and can be eaten with the rest of the cheese. They can turn a somewhat boring Caerphilly into a wonderful Yarg. As you can see in my photos, you can use them on your soft white mold cheeses to become part of the cheese, or you can use other types of leaves to just wrap your cheeses in while they age.

Offline FRANCOIS

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #21 on: October 30, 2009, 03:59:22 AM »
Those are lovely cheeses.  We have covered freezing in another thread, pointing out that the leaves need to be separated by wax paper or similar.  We have also discussed the best time of year to collect some leaves (grape in the Spring).  You are right that alcohol is not needed for leaf wrapping, it's a taste preference.

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #22 on: October 30, 2009, 06:41:19 AM »
Merged old thread on this Board and new thread in Cheddared Type Board on use of leaves in wrapping cheeses.

Kelley, those sure are some beautiful cheeses, huge congrats.

Offline Tropit

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #23 on: October 30, 2009, 08:50:34 AM »
Kelley...this cheeses are so beautiful!  I love the way that you used just a leaf, or two, and not covered the entire cheese.  You can see the lovely outline of the leaves that way. 

I'll have to try freezing the leaves.  Our grapes and figs are just about ready to drop their leaves, so it's a perfect time.  Thanks for the tip!
~Cindy

Offline Alex

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #24 on: October 30, 2009, 10:20:48 AM »
freezing leaves is a good way to soften them, no need to poach or simmilar.
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Offline Kelley

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #25 on: October 30, 2009, 11:12:46 AM »
And I actually don't separate the leave when I freeze them. I just stack them up on top of each other and put them flat in a zip lock bag. They separate pretty easily when they are frozen. Lazy method, but works for me. I'm afraid if it was too much work I wouldn't get around to it!

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #26 on: October 30, 2009, 09:55:27 PM »
Very creative use of the leaves Kelley. Well done!

Offline Gürkan Yeniçeri

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #27 on: November 01, 2009, 05:22:44 PM »
I love you guys, you made me hungry for making and eating more cheese.

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #28 on: November 01, 2009, 05:54:28 PM »
Just curious the Greek resteraunt here uses a lot of grape leaves in food prep. I dont' know where they get them but I wonder if they would work in cheese? They seem to be very soft.

Offline Gürkan Yeniçeri

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #29 on: November 01, 2009, 10:30:40 PM »
Debi,
They are preserved grape leaves (in salt and brine) and yes, they should be OK for cheese. In  fact I will be trying this soon.