Author Topic: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses  (Read 11987 times)

Offline MarkShelton

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #75 on: July 18, 2010, 03:46:52 AM »
Those are beautiful! +1
I am constantly in awe of the very first people that consumed these things, despite how funky looking and smelling they had become.


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Offline mtncheesemaker(Pam)

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #76 on: July 18, 2010, 01:29:25 PM »
You're very welcome!
Those cheeses look Sweet!
How do you know which is Geo and which is Pen?

Offline iratherfly

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #77 on: July 18, 2010, 04:35:10 PM »
Thanks!

The geo always comes in first to prep the surface pH for the PC and create the rind. The creamy yellow around the cheese is the Geo (and a little but of mild B.Linen from the PLA I've used). Those spotty flowering white clouds are the PC. Geo and PC feels a bit different even in drier harder cheeses. The geo covers everything (white powder-like appearance in drier cheese, rind on young soft cheese) while the PC is like a velvety high bloom that will leave your fingerprint on it if you hold the cheese...

By the way, the leafs turned brown after a few days in the Calvados. I read somewhere that on some cheeses like some versions of Banon they wrap it with leaves and wait for them to turn brown so they know the cheese is ready.

Offline Brie

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #78 on: July 18, 2010, 08:22:24 PM »
Now that I have my grape leaves from Pam, I have been studying this thread. I froze the leaves when they arrived, as I live in Arizona and they were quite hot on arrival. Have some Sainte Maure draining (with a layer of sweet paprika in the middle). Advice advised, as I continue on with all of you (w)rappers. I originally intended to layer outside of cheese with paprika as well; yet, now am thinking about wrapping with the grape leaves (un-macerated in liquere). Ah, I have four of them--I think I'll try a quad of St. Maure:
# 1) Paprika Rind only
#2) Paprika Rind with Grape Leaves
#3) Basil Leaf Rind
#4) Grape Leaves steeped in Cointreau
Will send along pics and outcomes.
Darn, another cheese meltdown--ahh, perfect fondue.

Offline Nitai

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #79 on: July 18, 2010, 10:43:44 PM »
Basil leaf rind! I have been wanting to do a leaf rind but did not think I had any leaves that would work (grapes just went in this year). But I have tons of basil. I don't want to soak in alcohol, so what might be the process for me?


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Offline iratherfly

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #80 on: July 19, 2010, 03:08:44 AM »
Brie - Paprika AND grape leaves on Saint Maure? Watch out not to mask the wonderful natural flavor of this cheese. Saint Maure really doesn't need much - is it usually packed full of its own flavor and aroma.

Traditionally there is some soaking of the leaves. It softens them and can deliver flavors, yeasts and rind pH changes to the cheese, as well as humidity to protect them and help bacteria grow. Basil may be overpowering and it also very thin so the rind may grow right through it (happened to me with sesame leaves which are about the same thickness). It also browns and spoils rather quickly and very sensitive to temperature changes.

I like your idea #4 the best - Grape Leaves steeped in Cointreau. I think that citrus flavors go very well with lactic goat's cheeses. I recently did a Chèvre with lemon oil and Herbes de Provence and it was yumm (mind you, this wasn't an aged cheese, just a simple Chèvre strained for a couple of days). In the same batch I did another Chèvre with Pimenton and olive oil. (photo below) I find that Pimenton (Spanish sweet Paprika) is far more gentle and compatible with goat's cheese than the classic Hungarian Paprika variety.

Nitai - if you don't want to use alcohol, there are some interesting alternatives to think of; how about apple or pear cider? Balsamic vinegar or sherry vinegar can do quite amazing things too but need to be applied with care not to overwhelm the cheese (diluted and salted I suppose, vinegar has a pH level of 3-4 so you don't want to kill your rind). You can also use olive oil or truffle oil or lemon oil.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2010, 03:13:56 AM by iratherfly »

Offline Gina

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #81 on: July 19, 2010, 11:39:26 AM »
To follow up on irf's suggestion of vinegar, I noticed a comment next to a leaf-wrapped cheese in the book French Cheeses, pg24 :  "Dried chestnut leaf softened and sterilized by boiling in water and vinegar"
A watched cheese never ages...

Offline iratherfly

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #82 on: July 19, 2010, 01:08:50 PM »
True, chestnuts leaves are very common with French cheeses and appear in versions of Rocamadour, Cabécou, Petit Billy, Banon and others.

I believe they use the vinegar not just as a flavor enhancer but also as a softener. You know how you use it sometimes to clean glasses and other things in the kitchen with calcium deposit? It breaks down the calcium - the same happens to the calcium in the leaf (why crispy lettuce stays strong in water but becomes wilted in vinaigrette)

Offline Mia

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Re: Leaf Wrapping Cheeses
« Reply #83 on: January 07, 2014, 09:07:27 PM »
This thread is awesome! I'm a newbie cheesemaker and have seen references but didn't know where to get more information.

Has anyone tried Bay Leaf presses on the outside of a cheese? A friend of mine suggested it with red peppercorns.

Thanks!