Author Topic: Wax hell -- Minor problems  (Read 1288 times)

Offline Baby Chee

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Clifford, North Dakota
  • Posts: 356
  • Cheeses: 9
  • Small Time, Big Taste
Wax hell -- Minor problems
« on: September 12, 2009, 09:49:57 AM »
I just started to try to wax.  It's hell.

I use a double boiler, but it is taking a long time to melt thoroughly.  I can overcome that easily in future, though.

My biggest problem is that my wheels are cold from the fridge, so when I dip the wax cools too quick and doesn't apply well enough.  Does everyone allow cheeses to warm to room temp first?
“For centuries, people thought the moon was made of green cheese. Then the astronauts found that the moon is really a big hard rock. That's what happens to cheese when you leave it out.”


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline goatherdess

  • Medium Cheese
  • ***
  • Location: Virginia
  • Posts: 94
  • Cheeses: 5
  • Default personal text
Re: Wax hell -- Minor problems
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2009, 10:36:53 AM »
I always wax at room temperature. If the cheese is cold the wax doesn't stick enough and slides as you make the second dip, forming a long rip/crack that is very hard to mend by re-dipping. I keep the wax at a temperature that is just barely enough to keep the wax melted. If the wax is too hot it can melt the cheese and cause problems peeling it off later, and it takes longer to set as well.

Also, I always heat the wax in a disposable pie tin over a pot of water, not an actual double boiler. The tins can be stored in a gallon-size ziploc bag after cooling and drying off the bottom.

Offline DeejayDebi

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Connecticut
  • Posts: 5,804
  • Cheeses: 95
    • Deejays Smoke Pit and DSP Forums
Re: Wax hell -- Minor problems
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2009, 10:39:42 AM »
You will have to let the cheese warm first or it will make the wax harden again. I didn't care for waxing. Made my cheese to moist for my liking.

Offline riha

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Posts: 104
  • Cheeses: 8
  • Default personal text
Re: Wax hell -- Minor problems
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2009, 10:52:46 AM »
I have read that it's a good idea to chill the cheese before waxing and find this very helpful. Then again, I'm using brush, not dipping. While brushing, you want it to cool down quick so you can turn the cheese in your hand to wax the other side.

This far I have not found waxing a pain, but I have only waxed 6 cheeses. 7th is waiting for coating right now. I actually like waxing :)

I also use a tin that I put to a pot of water. When I'm done waxing, just let it cool down and there it stays in store until the next session.

Offline DeejayDebi

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Connecticut
  • Posts: 5,804
  • Cheeses: 95
    • Deejays Smoke Pit and DSP Forums
Re: Wax hell -- Minor problems
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2009, 11:10:08 AM »
There are a few people ere really good at waxing - I am not one of them!


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline Baby Chee

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Clifford, North Dakota
  • Posts: 356
  • Cheeses: 9
  • Small Time, Big Taste
Re: Wax hell -- Minor problems
« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2009, 11:17:49 AM »
The tin idea sounds good.  I'll shift to those in the future. 

Today I (plan to) wax 4 8" wheels of Gouda, then my red wax is on hold for a good while. 
I like the idea of wax because I don't have to spend time and effort washing brining salting, etc. every day or two.  Just throw them in the fridge for a couple months and they look great as presentation pieces for gifts.  Something about the bright red cries "festive" and enthuses the Magpie-senses in cheese lovers.
“For centuries, people thought the moon was made of green cheese. Then the astronauts found that the moon is really a big hard rock. That's what happens to cheese when you leave it out.”

Offline Wayne Harris

  • Wine and Cheesemaker
  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Cleveland, Ohio
  • Posts: 1,938
  • Cheeses: 53
  • Wayne Harris
Re: Wax hell -- Minor problems
« Reply #6 on: September 13, 2009, 12:22:05 PM »
Waxing can be a pain in the butt.  But it does put a nice finish on a wheel.

I dedicate a pot to the task and keep it 3/4 full of wax.   I do not use a double boiler, but I have an electric stove.

I also made a dipping tool that seems to help a bit.

Also, I let the cheese get to room temp and I do not heat the wax up super hot. I heat the wax up to the point of just barely being fluid. (no lumps)

Then it will coat the cheese evenly and thickly.

Just a couple a dips.

Here is an old thread.
Wayne A. Harris - in vino veritas

Offline riha

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Posts: 104
  • Cheeses: 8
  • Default personal text
Re: Wax hell -- Minor problems
« Reply #7 on: September 13, 2009, 12:59:42 PM »
I have to admit that even though I like waxing by brushing (just coated my gouda, good fun), I would like to get a good dipping setup. Those wheels are absolutely beautiful.

Oh, and I just want to say that I thought it PITA as well the first time I tried. But I just needed to refine my technique a bit and now it's going nicely. Far from perfect still.

Offline Baby Chee

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Clifford, North Dakota
  • Posts: 356
  • Cheeses: 9
  • Small Time, Big Taste
Re: Wax hell -- Minor problems
« Reply #8 on: September 13, 2009, 03:26:03 PM »
I saw your post of that wax wire yesterday before I got seriously off track with problems.

All I could thin was, "What a nice thing to have..."  And then I melted down with the cheese.  If I get seriously addicted to home cheese making I will probably follow you with that large wax pot and wire dip.  There was a video somewhere online about a small cheese factor in VT or NH that showed them doing a similar thing with a much larger pot recessed into a countertop.  It was an envy to behold.  3 cheese on a wire would dip into yellow and come up beautiful.

Thanks for the link!

What I got wasn't bad, but it was a hassle.
“For centuries, people thought the moon was made of green cheese. Then the astronauts found that the moon is really a big hard rock. That's what happens to cheese when you leave it out.”

Offline Sailor Con Queso

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Kentucky
  • Posts: 2,522
  • Cheeses: 125
    • Boone Creek Creamery
Re: Wax hell -- Minor problems
« Reply #9 on: September 13, 2009, 04:47:16 PM »
I use a $9 small crock pot from Wal-Mart that is permanently loaded with red wax. When I want to wax just turn the crock pot on 15-20 minutes ahead of time. Big enough to dip wheels in with no mess and no cleanup.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline Wayne Harris

  • Wine and Cheesemaker
  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Cleveland, Ohio
  • Posts: 1,938
  • Cheeses: 53
  • Wayne Harris
Re: Wax hell -- Minor problems
« Reply #10 on: September 13, 2009, 07:22:04 PM »
Agreed, A permanent pot is the way to go.
Wayne A. Harris - in vino veritas